Can keep a job, but stuck in entry level position.

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jetbuilder
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08 Jan 2015, 8:26 am

I have been at my current job for 8 years, but I've gone pretty much nowhere within the company. I'm only a rung or two up the ladder from the most basic position there. I'm really good at my job, but I'm pretty much doing the same thing since I started.

Is this a common theme for some people on the spectrum? Has anyone else gotten jobs and held them for a long time, but just stay in the same position you were hired for? I think it may be because I'm good at my job, but not good at "networking" and socializing with management.


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kraftiekortie
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08 Jan 2015, 9:22 pm

I've been doing the same exact job for 34 years. I should have gotten promoted--but it never happened.

The fact that I'm going to get a pension in, at most, 8 years, dulls the pain somewhat.



DeepHour
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08 Jan 2015, 11:26 pm

I worked for one particular organization for twenty years, and halfway through was promoted to a "middle management" position. I had all sorts of problems with that, not least the business of fitting in to a "hierarchy", and ended up more or less where I'd started!

Will pick up some sort of pension in three years though, if the Government doesn't change the terms before then. And they might do just that.....



kraftiekortie
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09 Jan 2015, 11:24 am

In the vast majority of cases, if the government changes the pension, those changes apply only to people hired after the changes have taken effect.

For example, there's been a few changes in our pension system--however, since I was hired in 1980, what applied in 1980 is what applies to me now, not what applied after the 2012 changes.



BTDT
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09 Jan 2015, 2:46 pm

Is there are particular job to which you wish to be promoted? Where I work they post job openings.

The problem for Aspies is that most incremental promotions involve more management responsibility and social interaction. Which means you need to to a move to a different job with more valued skills to get a promotion.

In my case, I've gotten lots of merit raises (actually not a lot of money individually, but they do add up) and some job title changes.



kraftiekortie
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09 Jan 2015, 4:56 pm

I took two civil service tests--and that's it.

I had three title changes--one was a "promotional" one.

However, on my job, I'm still a "contributor."

It's actually better--since I'm able to work the night shift. If I were a supervisor, I'd have to go to 8-4, 9-5 or 10-6.



DeepHour
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09 Jan 2015, 5:33 pm

kraftiekortie wrote:
In the vast majority of cases, if the government changes the pension, those changes apply only to people hired after the changes have taken effect.

For example, there's been a few changes in our pension system--however, since I was hired in 1980, what applied in 1980 is what applies to me now, not what applied after the 2012 changes.



I know what you mean, and things could certainly be a lot worse in this area.

But they've already changed the method of inflation-indexing (in their favour, of course) for Public Sector pensions, and that applies to all members and all past contributions. You probably know how the Reagan and Clinton administrations "improved" the methods of calculating US CPI in the 1980s and 1990s, and this is very similar.

They're also raising the age at which the State Pension (Social Security in US) can be claimed. Some people will never receive it at all as a result.



kraftiekortie
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09 Jan 2015, 5:39 pm

So far, they've raised it to 67 from 65 in increments. I'm going to get full Social Security at age 67

Are they thinking of raising it to 70?



progaspie
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09 Jan 2015, 5:49 pm

jetbuilder wrote:
I have been at my current job for 8 years, but I've gone pretty much nowhere within the company. I'm only a rung or two up the ladder from the most basic position there. I'm really good at my job, but I'm pretty much doing the same thing since I started.

Is this a common theme for some people on the spectrum? Has anyone else gotten jobs and held them for a long time, but just stay in the same position you were hired for? I think it may be because I'm good at my job, but not good at "networking" and socializing with management.


Do you have an annual review process where you sit down with your manager to review your performance during the year and where you describe your aspirations within the organisation? This is one of the important cogs that managements use to determine the suitability of the employee for advancement within the organisation.



DeepHour
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09 Jan 2015, 5:59 pm

kraftiekortie wrote:
So far, they've raised it to 67 from 65 in increments. I'm going to get full Social Security at age 67

Are they thinking of raising it to 70?



The age at which the British State Pension can be claimed is set to rise from 65 (current) to 68 over the next years. But this timeframe has already been reduced, and the current government plans to raise the qualifying age further in view of rising life expectancy.

It is generally believed that people in their thirties won't be eligible until well into their 70s, and a good many observers think there won't be a State Pension of any description for them by then.



kraftiekortie
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09 Jan 2015, 6:01 pm

Your state pension, taken alone, really is bare-bones.

How do old people survive in England?