Have you had a better time socializing overseas?

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EgaoNoGenki
Deinonychus
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04 Aug 2016, 1:36 am

This question is for anyone with Asperger's/ASD and otherwise any high-functioning form of Autism.

America is going to pot, so I must relocate overseas permanently in a few years (hopefully faster should Trump ever get elected.)

If you make a social mistake overseas, would locals assume you just made a "foreigner's misstep" and still be on good terms with you?

In other words, is making a social misstep more forgivable as a foreigner when overseas, since the locals assume you just don't know how to socialize like a local yet?

Therefore, will I have an easier social life due to being a foreigner prone to making social mistakes in the locals' eyes? (Even though in reality, I also make social mistakes back home?)

I hope being a foreigner makes me more likely to find a future wife!


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LanguageMeterScholar
Blue Jay
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04 Aug 2016, 2:36 am

I come from Australia and have lived overseas for about sixteen years. I have real problems socializing with people from the same cultural background as me but overseas these problems aren't an issue I feel much more comfortable around foreigners. They don't expect so much from you and I adapt much better. In a few weeks time I'm going to return home but hopefully now that I have been self-diagnosed with HFA things will be easier.

I hope that might be of some help to you.


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Jo_B1_Kenobi
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04 Aug 2016, 6:47 am

EgaoNoGenki wrote:
This question is for anyone with Asperger's/ASD and otherwise any high-functioning form of Autism.

America is going to pot, so I must relocate overseas permanently in a few years (hopefully faster should Trump ever get elected.)

If you make a social mistake overseas, would locals assume you just made a "foreigner's misstep" and still be on good terms with you?

In other words, is making a social misstep more forgivable as a foreigner when overseas, since the locals assume you just don't know how to socialize like a local yet?

Therefore, will I have an easier social life due to being a foreigner prone to making social mistakes in the locals' eyes? (Even though in reality, I also make social mistakes back home?)

I hope being a foreigner makes me more likely to find a future wife!



I'm English and I find different cultures easier to get on with than my own. My favourite culture is the Aussie culture. I really like their attitudes because they come across to me as being much more straight forward than the folk here in England. I get on really well with straight-up blunt English people and the Australian culture seems to encourage that type of fearless honesty (that's not to say that Aussies, like all of us, don't have a huge range of approaches within their people - just that their culture appears to be generally more direct and I really like that.)
The other place I found it easy to get on with people is in the US. I spent a month in the mid-west (Illinois and Wisconsin) and I found the people there very warm and friendly. Again there was a straight-forward openess which I found really helpful.


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