If there was a cure for Autism, would you take it?

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If there was a cure for your autism, would you take it?
Yes 19%  19%  [ 9 ]
No 44%  44%  [ 21 ]
I would have to think about it. 21%  21%  [ 10 ]
I like turtles 17%  17%  [ 8 ]
Total votes : 48

darkphantomx1
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12 Feb 2015, 10:27 am

If there was a cure available for your autism, would you take it? A cure woudn't change who you are, it would just significantly improve areas where autistic people have troubles at. For instance, your social skills would improve and become normal, language skills would become normal if applicable, and cognitive abilities would reach normal intelligence if applicable as well.

If you had a cure, would you take it? Why or why not?



Shauna88
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12 Feb 2015, 10:37 am

No.



kraftiekortie
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12 Feb 2015, 11:40 am

LOL....this question has been asked at least ten times in the past few months.

I lean towards the turtles.



Skilpadde
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12 Feb 2015, 12:09 pm

I like turtles


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Gaara
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12 Feb 2015, 12:13 pm

Definitely turtles, was obsessed with Ninja Turtles once upon a time :ninja:



Skilpadde
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12 Feb 2015, 12:20 pm

Gaara wrote:
Definitely turtles, was obsessed with Ninja Turtles once upon a time :ninja:

I was too at a time. I still like them, and I love turtles.


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To those who are complaining about the quarantine period and curfews, just remember that your grandparents were called to war, you are being called to sit on the couch and watch Netflix. You can do this.

Always be yourself unless you can be a turtle
Then always be a turtle

“When the green hills are covered with talking wires and the wolves no longer sing, what good will the money you paid for our land be then” ― Chief Seattle


Joe90
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12 Feb 2015, 1:17 pm

Yes I would take a cure, with no hesitation or regrets. I don't care if Asperger's makes me ''who I am'' and all that crap, I want to be able to cope better in a job, be more able to chat more, not be so startled and jumpy by sudden loud noises, not be the most eccentrically eccentric of the eccentric, and not give off these uncanny vibes that makes other girls keep staring at me funny. Life would be great without all those things.


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Fnord
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12 Feb 2015, 1:24 pm

No, I would not take the cure. Why? Well, here is a plot synopsis of the play 'Harvey' that should help explain it ...

Wikipedia wrote:
Elwood P. Dowd is an affable man who claims to have an unseen (and presumably imaginary) friend Harvey -- whom Elwood describes as a six-foot, three-and-one-half-inch tall pooka resembling an anthropomorphic rabbit. Elwood introduces Harvey to everyone he meets. His social-climbing sister, Veta, increasingly finds his eccentric behavior embarrassing. She decides to have him committed to a sanitarium to spare her and her daughter Myrtle Mae from future embarrassment. When they arrive at the sanitarium, a comedy of errors ensues. The young, handsome, and very flirtatious Dr. Sanderson commits Veta instead of Elwood, but when the truth comes out, the search is on for Elwood and his invisible companion. When Elwood shows up at the sanitarium looking for his lost friend Harvey, it seems that the mild-mannered Elwood's delusion has had a strange influence on the staff, including sanitarium director Dr. Chumley. Only just before Elwood is to be given an injection that will make him into a "perfectly normal human being, and you know what bastards they are!" (in the words of a taxi cab driver who has become involved in the proceedings) does Veta realize that she would rather have Elwood the same as he has always been -- carefree and kind -- even if it means living with Harvey.
I would not want to be 'cured' because I do not want to become like the NT 'bastards' that have been tormenting me all of my life.


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elysian1969
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12 Feb 2015, 1:33 pm

When I was younger I think I would have done anything to become "normal." I worried more about what others expected of me than what truly gave me satisfaction and joy. I've had to re-think the desire to be normal- or even to try to appear to be normal- over the years.

I don't know what normal is, just as I can't imagine what it would be like to be unable to read. I can't recall a time in my life when I couldn't read. I could read before I was 2 years old and have no idea how or why that happened (one of those things peculiar to hyperlexia.)

I could do without the social awkwardness, physical awkwardness, and emotional disconnects of HFA, but the older I get the more I embrace the way I am because that's the box of chocolates I got. I also enjoy the places that my wiring allows me to go, places that many NTs have a hard time getting to at all. My outer world may look boring, but I do most of my living inside my head anyway.

I don't think I would be game at this time in my life to magically be made NT- then I would have to learn a whole different road map than the one I've known for the past 45 years.

It's an interesting thought on one level, but the older I get the more comfortable I'm getting in my own skin. :heart: :skull:


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LupaLuna
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12 Feb 2015, 3:05 pm

I have been doing a lot of research into aspergers/HFA and I'm beginning to think that autism in general may be cause by sensory perception problems and not so much by internal brain issues. Think about it for a second, If your entire perception of the world is being distorted and that's all you see and are unaware that your perception of the world is being distorted. Your mind is gonna develop in that distorted environment and that's all your ever gonna know about the world around you.

Now with that said. Would you want a cure? Here's something to think about. you grew up your entire life, seeing the world through the lens of this sensory perception distortion(SPD). What do you think would happen to you, psychologically, if that SPD where removed from you?



404nf
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12 Feb 2015, 3:11 pm

If taking the cure means I start wasting time socializing with people, and start believing in idiotic things, then no. For NTs, ignorance is bliss.



Raleigh
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12 Feb 2015, 4:26 pm

No. I've found happiness for the first time in my life after being diagnosed with an incurable, neurological disorder. Autism is awesome.


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CockneyRebel
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12 Feb 2015, 4:35 pm

No, because being on the spectrum makes me a sweet and unique person, who looks at the world in a pea flavoured way.


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anthropic_principle
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12 Feb 2015, 5:50 pm

this thread has been done enough times already, but no i wouldn't, even though i feel like dying right now. i feel the question is flawed though, because if such a 'cure' existed, you just simply would not be yourself after it went through.
it would be like killing yourself and giving your body to a new personality to enjoy, it wouldn't be like getting over a cold.



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12 Feb 2015, 5:56 pm

Fnord wrote:
No, I would not take the cure. Why? Well, here is a plot synopsis of the play 'Harvey' that should help explain it ...
Wikipedia wrote:
Elwood P. Dowd is an affable man who claims to have an unseen (and presumably imaginary) friend Harvey -- whom Elwood describes as a six-foot, three-and-one-half-inch tall pooka resembling an anthropomorphic rabbit. Elwood introduces Harvey to everyone he meets. His social-climbing sister, Veta, increasingly finds his eccentric behavior embarrassing. She decides to have him committed to a sanitarium to spare her and her daughter Myrtle Mae from future embarrassment. When they arrive at the sanitarium, a comedy of errors ensues. The young, handsome, and very flirtatious Dr. Sanderson commits Veta instead of Elwood, but when the truth comes out, the search is on for Elwood and his invisible companion. When Elwood shows up at the sanitarium looking for his lost friend Harvey, it seems that the mild-mannered Elwood's delusion has had a strange influence on the staff, including sanitarium director Dr. Chumley. Only just before Elwood is to be given an injection that will make him into a "perfectly normal human being, and you know what bastards they are!" (in the words of a taxi cab driver who has become involved in the proceedings) does Veta realize that she would rather have Elwood the same as he has always been -- carefree and kind -- even if it means living with Harvey.
I would not want to be 'cured' because I do not want to become like the NT 'bastards' that have been tormenting me all of my life.


I get that!