Delayed reaction time: Asperger's or BPD?

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Owl123
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09 Jul 2015, 11:40 pm

Many times people would get mad of me if I answer them late when they're talking in front of me. Also, many times in my College subject whenever our professor would call on the ones who get high scores would be called out in class. While I was not quite paying attention to the names she was calling, I concentrated on my notes that would be included in our next exam, she called my last name and I can hear it. But she called me again and this time she called my last name aloud enough for them to look at me, then that was the time I looked at her and raised my hand as I supposed to. I didn't realize that I really have to look at her and rais my hand, also, I always wouldn't expect my scores to be that high since I knew to myself that I'm not reviewing my notes well. It happened twice and got same reaction from her.

There were also times like I'd just contain my emotions 'cause really I don't know how to react. I've been thinking that my time perception was a great issue for me. Many times I'd be lost in the passage of time and never realize the full extent to how many hours had passed. When I was a kid I'd also love wearing wristwatch since it makes me feel like I have my super power and I'd feel safe.

In my college years spurts most of problems with my own, such as having poor time management and executive functioning. There was a day that I came in school at 7:30am believing that it's Friday, I went to our Sociology classroom but when I peaked inside the slit of the door I found studenta from different course. I got confused, and gladly I saw a classmate in the cafeteria, when to my surprise it's still Thursday, so our class would be @10am. I felt chaotic most of the time. A friend suggested me to have a calendar and mark the passing days. Probably, routines would make me feel on track with the passage of time yet Idk how I'd come into this state of being lost and even don't know how I'd manage myself and things around me.

Procrastination overpowered me and would often get depressed which is probably one of the reasons for my delayed time perception.

:nerdy: :(



arielhawksquill
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10 Jul 2015, 7:14 am

Slow processing time in social situations seems to be a common autistic trait. Poor time perception and time management, including procrastination, is also common but could be symptomatic of attention deficit disorder. None of these things is related to borderline, as far as I know. BPD causes emotional disregulation and difficulty in relationships; autistics (women especially) are sometime misdiagnosed as BPD because of meltdowns and problems relating to other people.



Owl123
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10 Jul 2015, 7:26 am

arielhawksquill wrote:
Slow processing time in social situations seems to be a common autistic trait. Poor time perception and time management, including procrastination, is also common but could be symptomatic of attention deficit disorder. None of these things is related to borderline, as far as I know. BPD causes emotional disregulation and difficulty in relationships; autistics (women especially) are sometime misdiagnosed as BPD because of meltdowns and problems relating to other people.


Thanks for answering! Uhm. I'm confused if I could have such delayed time perception with BPD because I'm also having meltdowns, overwhelming emotional problems and problems having a close relationship, like my friend who is too clingy to me and often tells me what to do which I find sort of choking, so the past months we had an arguement though now we're good and our friendship was back. Idk. :? :|



arielhawksquill
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10 Jul 2015, 7:51 am

Isn't it usually the BPD sufferer who is clingy, and not the other way around? It would alleviate some of your confusion if you went to a professional for a diagnosis.



Owl123
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10 Jul 2015, 8:12 am

arielhawksquill wrote:
Isn't it usually the BPD sufferer who is clingy, and not the other way around? It would alleviate some of your confusion if you went to a professional for a diagnosis.


Well, I guess. Idk. In some way I'm also clingy to a friend like when I'm in a party with crowds of unfamiliar faces. But, surely I can survive a day without really talking about my concerns to her, since we've been like that. I can really say that I can succeed well when I'm on my own or not in a group. Regarding with this relationship problems, I was thinking if It can be considered to have both and as comorbid. Or... idk. Yes, I'll be seeing a Psychologist/psychatrist soon.



arielhawksquill
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10 Jul 2015, 11:24 am

Owl123 wrote:
Well, I guess. Idk. In some way I'm also clingy to a friend like when I'm in a party with crowds of unfamiliar faces.


A lot of people on the spectrum have someone they depend on to help them navigate social situations and find their way when going to new places. It doesn't imply an unhealthy emotional relationship to need that kind of help as an autistic person.



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10 Jul 2015, 11:57 am

I am confused, I thought you raised your hand in class general education or college when you had a question or something to say.....not after they call your name, then it would make no sense to raise your hand to speak if they've already called on you?

Sounds like you sort of space out like I do, and I know I don't have BPD...so it could very well be the aspergers, but not sure its something only people with aspergers would struggle with. I've gotten the day mixed up lots of times, and I've seen normal people without any neurological condition lose track of it as well, have been asked 'what day is it' more than once.

Also most of your post is in past tense...does that mean you used to have this delayed reaction time...or still do and are just giving past examples? just wanted to make sure I was reading it clear.



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10 Jul 2015, 1:54 pm

Sweetleaf wrote:
I thought you raised your hand in class general education or college when you had a question or something to say.....not after they call your name, then it would make no sense to raise your hand to speak if they've already called on you?

I was wondering that too. I also wondered what kind of a control freak would expect you to look at them as well as raise your hand the moment they called your name. But maybe that's just my jaundiced attitude to authority showing through.

Nothing you describe in your first post sounds like BPD to me, it sounds like my autism (AFAIK I don't have BPD). I'm slow to mentally "change gear," and it's a classic sign of autism to get hyperfocussed on something, to be hard to interrupt from it, and to lose all track of time while hyperfocussed.



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10 Jul 2015, 3:49 pm

It doesn't sould like BPD at all but it sounds very aspergish.

ToughDiamond wrote:
Sweetleaf wrote:
I thought you raised your hand in class general education or college when you had a question or something to say.....not after they call your name, then it would make no sense to raise your hand to speak if they've already called on you?

I was wondering that too. I also wondered what kind of a control freak would expect you to look at them as well as raise your hand the moment they called your name. But maybe that's just my jaundiced attitude to authority showing through.

I am not sure about this specific situation but in many schools in my country you are supposed to raise your hand when they call your name to show where you are(most classes are at least 25 people, 30-35 students in one class are common so it is easy to get "lost in crowd", especially since teachers must remember about 100-150 new faces every year).

It's a ritual that occurs during the presence checking in the start of a lesson.

Your name gets called, you raise your hand and make eye contact, teacher looks at you and checks "present" in the attendants list then calls next person on the list. If you don't answer in time and teacher recognizes you he calls your name again, wanting you to follow the ritual. But if teacher doesn't recognize you and you don't answer in time the teacher checks "absent" next to your name on the list. Well... he does unless you have some friends in class that yell "He/she is present!" fast enough and buy you some more time to react.

I suppose it might occur also while listing people awarded. Perhaps the hand raised works as a pointer for "Where the person I should congratulate using body language is?" in that case. Congratulating using body language requires some eye contact too so it's also natural that Owl123 got called again after the teacher saw him and recognized the name call got ignored.


I also had delayed reaction to the ritual when I was in school that had it. Fortunately I was usually the 2nd, 3rd or 4th person on the list due to my surname so while I always missed the call for first person I had time to realize the ritual has started and my name will get called at any moment but I didn't have to keep focused on the ritual for long enough to get bored and stop paying attention to the names - which was happening about 6th name.



Owl123
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11 Jul 2015, 8:02 am

Kiriae wrote:
It doesn't sould like BPD at all but it sounds very aspergish.

ToughDiamond wrote:
Sweetleaf wrote:
I thought you raised your hand in class general education or college when you had a question or something to say.....not after they call your name, then it would make no sense to raise your hand to speak if they've already called on you?

I was wondering that too. I also wondered what kind of a control freak would expect you to look at them as well as raise your hand the moment they called your name. But maybe that's just my jaundiced attitude to authority showing through.

I am not sure about this specific situation but in many schools in my country you are supposed to raise your hand when they call your name to show where you are(most classes are at least 25 people, 30-35 students in one class are common so it is easy to get "lost in crowd", especially since teachers must remember about 100-150 new faces every year).

It's a ritual that occurs during the presence checking in the start of a lesson.

Your name gets called, you raise your hand and make eye contact, teacher looks at you and checks "present" in the attendants list then calls next person on the list. If you don't answer in time and teacher recognizes you he calls your name again, wanting you to follow the ritual. But if teacher doesn't recognize you and you don't answer in time the teacher checks "absent" next to your name on the list. Well... he does unless you have some friends in class that yell "He/she is present!" fast enough and buy you some more time to react.

I suppose it might occur also while listing people awarded. Perhaps the hand raised works as a pointer for "Where the person I should congratulate using body language is?" in that case. Congratulating using body language requires some eye contact too so it's also natural that Owl123 got called again after the teacher saw him and recognized the name call got ignored.


I also had delayed reaction to the ritual when I was in school that had it. Fortunately I was usually the 2nd, 3rd or 4th person on the list due to my surname so while I always missed the call for first person I had time to realize the ritual has started and my name will get called at any moment but I didn't have to keep focused on the ritual for long enough to get bored and stop paying attention to the names - which was happening about 6th name.



Uhm. Yes, we're 91 in a class. We're actually 3 sections, the two has 45 students each and we've got 46. So, the other section has different schedule for their section alone. It's a ritual for us to make an eye contact when your name is being called, uhmm. But at times I still get confused if I really have to. In that case I heard my name but Idk why I always react to late :? Uhm. That ritual is actually not emphasized to us word by word, such gestures are part of our culture and are implied. Also it confuses me what to do in a certain situation as that because most of the time I don't know what I must do so I need them to tell me. By the way, I'm from Philippines. :heart:



Owl123
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11 Jul 2015, 8:13 am

Sweetleaf wrote:
I am confused, I thought you raised your hand in class general education or college when you had a question or something to say.....not after they call your name, then it would make no sense to raise your hand to speak if they've already called on you?

Sounds like you sort of space out like I do, and I know I don't have BPD...so it could very well be the aspergers, but not sure its something only people with aspergers would struggle with. I've gotten the day mixed up lots of times, and I've seen normal people without any neurological condition lose track of it as well, have been asked 'what day is it' more than once.

Also most of your post is in past tense...does that mean you used to have this delayed reaction time...or still do and are just giving past examples? just wanted to make sure I was reading it clear.


Hi, Uhm. We're 91 students in a class, it's actually a merge class. It's a Nursing College btw. Lol. So, our routine/ritual would often be like such. I guess it's part of the culture, but that time I heard my name called out while I'm on my notes, Idk that I really have to raise my hand. Most of the time I get confused, because such gestures are actually just implied and not told to us word by word.

Uhm. Uh... Irdk. Lol. I think I'm just giving examples to trace back a dot so I can connect my thoughts.