Could i be autistic my whole life and realize at 22?

Page 1 of 2 [ 19 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next

eldor
Emu Egg
Emu Egg

Joined: 13 Dec 2016
Gender: Male
Posts: 8
Location: Israel

13 Dec 2016, 12:48 pm

Hello, just lately i realizes i have alot of autistic characteristic as a child, and have many of them now,
i had trouble empathising with others, had a few friends because most people seem boring to me,
i am diagnosed with ADHD, the thing is - i'm actually good at learning, always had good grades, engaged in social interactions (usually i didn't enjoy them), and i don't have a known neurological problem,
i kind of "survived" my whole life, doing things i don't like, being with people who bore me
that seemed to be natural to me, untill i saw Temple Grandin and realised this is not normal to feel like an outsider my whole life, every work place i've been felt unnatural, also never understood social norms, but i have a friend from childhood that was just like me, so i guess we helped each other cope with sociaty...

bottom line - could i be autistic and not realize it for 22 years?
what's the next step for me to do, in your opinion?

edit: i guess my only known neurological problem is in motor skills, im very inaccurate when drawing, very clumsy with my hands, and clumsy when playing soccer, i have favored hand for certain actions (typing-left, throwing-right)



Last edited by eldor on 13 Dec 2016, 12:54 pm, edited 1 time in total.

TheAP
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 28 Dec 2014
Age: 21
Gender: Female
Posts: 20,314
Location: Canada

13 Dec 2016, 12:53 pm

Yes. Many people are diagnosed late. You could find a psychiatrist and talk to them about the possibility of autism.



EzraS
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 24 Sep 2013
Gender: Male
Posts: 27,317
Location: Twin Peaks

13 Dec 2016, 1:35 pm

Totally possible. Or you could have dyspraxia (motor skills disorder) which has some things in common with autism. Or both of those together. If anything else it sounds like you can relate to us and vice versa. I'd say as far as a next step, you can hang out here and ask questions and also read answers to questions. I've certainly learned a lot of stuff here.



StarTrekker
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 22 Apr 2012
Age: 27
Gender: Female
Posts: 3,187
Location: Starship Voyager, somewhere in the Delta quadrant

13 Dec 2016, 1:57 pm

I didn't realise I was autistic until I was eighteen, and didn't get diagnosed until I was 21, so your finding out at 22 is totally plausible. Growing up, I had the same feeling as you, that I was just an outsider and that was the way it was. It wasn't a pleasant feeling, but it was just my life, and I didn't know any different. Now, knowing I was autistic the whole time, my life makes a lot more sense.


_________________
"Survival is insufficient" - Seven of Nine
Diagnosed with ASD level 1 on the 10th of April, 2014
Rediagnosed with ASD level 2 on the 4th of May, 2019
Thanks to Olympiadis for my fantastic avatar!


Biscuitman
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 11 Mar 2013
Age: 40
Gender: Male
Posts: 2,062
Location: Dunking jammy dodgers

13 Dec 2016, 2:25 pm

Knew very little of aspergers aside from obvious newsworthy cases until I was 33 years old when I heard a radio programme talking about it and it sounded just like me. Was diagnosed at 37.



Dear_one
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 2 Feb 2008
Age: 71
Gender: Male
Posts: 3,299
Location: Where the Great Plains meet the Northern Pines

13 Dec 2016, 2:31 pm

When I was 57 and my mother was dying, I realized we both had Aspergers. That diagnosis had only been available for twelve years by then, so what I'd learned from watching her was how to avoid any diagnosis at all. She used to volunteer at a mental hospital to pick up tricks for looking sane while quite eccentric.



pcuser
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 28 Dec 2014
Age: 69
Gender: Male
Posts: 913

13 Dec 2016, 3:07 pm

I wasn't aware i had autism until a family member suggested it when I was 60 years old. As soon as I was aware, my whole life started making sense...



IstominFan
Veteran
Veteran

Joined: 25 Nov 2016
Age: 55
Gender: Female
Posts: 11,114
Location: Santa Maria, CA.

13 Dec 2016, 4:24 pm

A lot of people are diagnosed far later than 22, or maybe not at all. I was 32 when I first read about Asperger syndrome, and the description sounded a lot like me, particularly the part about special interests and social ineptitude. By that time, I had finished my university education and even taught English for a year at a junior college.

No, 22 is definitely not too old at all. I'm 52 without any formal diagnosis.



crystaltermination
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 17 Nov 2016
Age: 29
Gender: Female
Posts: 1,028
Location: UK

14 Dec 2016, 4:08 pm

You could very well be. As a newly diagnosed person with ASD and previously skeptical of ever being on the spectrum in the first place, it strikes me people could - and do - continue on in life indefinitely without any professional intervention or knowledge of the subject at all. At 25 I am still very lucky to have been given the support I have now, but I also wish I'd been helped with this at a younger age. It definitely would have eased a lot of my previous confusions regarding making friends and not fitting in.


_________________
On hiatus thanks to someone in real life breaching my privacy here, without my permission! May be back one day. +tips hat+


blackicmenace
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 28 Nov 2016
Age: 42
Gender: Male
Posts: 2,872
Location: Sagittarius A

14 Dec 2016, 4:14 pm

Took 37 years for me. Just knew I didn't fit in this world.


_________________
Do not fear to be eccentric in opinion, for every opinion now accepted was once eccentric.” ― Bertrand Russell


pcuser
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 28 Dec 2014
Age: 69
Gender: Male
Posts: 913

14 Dec 2016, 8:34 pm

crystaltermination wrote:
You could very well be. As a newly diagnosed person with ASD and previously skeptical of ever being on the spectrum in the first place, it strikes me people could - and do - continue on in life indefinitely without any professional intervention or knowledge of the subject at all. At 25 I am still very lucky to have been given the support I have now, but I also wish I'd been helped with this at a younger age. It definitely would have eased a lot of my previous confusions regarding making friends and not fitting in.

Amen to that...



AspieUtah
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 20 Jun 2014
Age: 57
Gender: Male
Posts: 6,118
Location: Brigham City, Utah

14 Dec 2016, 8:39 pm

I was screened with autism at age 52 years and diagnosed with autism at age 53. It would have been a little helpful to know at age 22.


_________________
Diagnosed in 2015 with ASD Level 1 by the University of Utah Health Care Autism Spectrum Disorder Clinic using the ADOS-2 Module 4 assessment instrument [11/30] -- Screened in 2014 with ASD by using the University of Cambridge Autism Research Centre AQ (Adult) [43/50]; EQ-60 for adults [11/80]; FQ [43/135]; SQ (Adult) [130/150] self-reported screening inventories -- Assessed since 1978 with an estimated IQ [≈145] by several clinicians -- Contact on WrongPlanet.net by private message (PM)


Dear_one
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 2 Feb 2008
Age: 71
Gender: Male
Posts: 3,299
Location: Where the Great Plains meet the Northern Pines

14 Dec 2016, 8:43 pm

I once wrote to a guy on a tech list with a business, wife and family, suggesting he might be an Aspie. A couple of days later, he finally understood his life.



Monkee100
Hummingbird
Hummingbird

User avatar

Joined: 14 Dec 2016
Age: 31
Gender: Female
Posts: 21
Location: Texas

14 Dec 2016, 8:50 pm

I didnt realize I had autism until I was 27. I think it is common to be diagnosed as adults because we go our whole lives being used to how we are and just accepting that we are different (not thinking there could be a an actual scientific reason for that!) I think this is especially true for those of us who had neglectful or non-involved parents. My parents just thought I was a "bad kid" and that was that. Once we start to read more about autism and realize how many of the traits have embodied us our whole lives, its like a giant weight is lifted and clarity comes rushing down. At least that is how it was for me. It has not really fixed any of my struggles though, it has just made me aware of exactly how I am different. I suggest reading as much as you can about high functioning autism. In time it will become 100% clear if it is what affects you. Welcome to a whole new way of seeing your world :-)



pcuser
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 28 Dec 2014
Age: 69
Gender: Male
Posts: 913

14 Dec 2016, 8:55 pm

Monkee100 wrote:
I didnt realize I had autism until I was 27. I think it is common to be diagnosed as adults because we go our whole lives being used to how we are and just accepting that we are different (not thinking there could be a an actual scientific reason for that!) I think this is especially true for those of us who had neglectful or non-involved parents. My parents just thought I was a "bad kid" and that was that. Once we start to read more about autism and realize how many of the traits have embodied us our whole lives, its like a giant weight is lifted and clarity comes rushing down. At least that is how it was for me. It has not really fixed any of my struggles though, it has just made me aware of exactly how I am different. I suggest reading as much as you can about high functioning autism. In time it will become 100% clear if it is what affects you. Welcome to a whole new way of seeing your world :-)

The only problem with not knowing is a big tendency to blame ourselves for not fitting in or being bad. The very first thing they told me upon diagnosis at age 60 was the blame stops here and now...