A lost Generation of Autistic people?

Page 1 of 2 [ 26 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next

Shahunshah
Veteran
Veteran

Joined: 6 May 2016
Gender: Male
Posts: 2,200
Location: NZ

04 Feb 2017, 5:21 am

This idea has just occurred to me and I am beginning to wonder whether it is the case. Over the months I have been on wrong planet I am beginning to notice a trend, that being many people in their 30s, 40s, 50s and 60s have struggled to adapt in time to the world around them due to being misunderstood at an early age. I am beginning to wonder could this be some big phenomenon in the autistic community whereby a generation of baby boomers have been left behind and deprived of support?



kraftiekortie
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 4 Feb 2014
Gender: Male
Posts: 70,823
Location: Queens, NYC

04 Feb 2017, 8:56 am

I feel this might apply to many people, not just people with autism.

People tend only to care about their immediate environment, and about conformity. About people when benefit them immediately. People who are "odd" are just not in their radar.

Hence, they are ignored and lost in the shuffle.

I have learned to just enjoy myself on my terms. I create my own shuffle.



naturalplastic
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 26 Aug 2010
Age: 65
Gender: Male
Posts: 24,043
Location: temperate zone

04 Feb 2017, 9:30 am

Shahunshah wrote:
This idea has just occurred to me and I am beginning to wonder whether it is the case. Over the months I have been on wrong planet I am beginning to notice a trend, that being many people in their 30s, 40s, 50s and 60s have struggled to adapt in time to the world around them due to being misunderstood at an early age. I am beginning to wonder could this be some big phenomenon in the autistic community whereby a generation of baby boomers have been left behind and deprived of support?


Kinda like asking "is water wet?".


Kanner discovered the hard core extreme kind of autism in circa 1960 ( what they later called "low functioning autism", and we now call "Type III autism").

But aspergers wasnt officially recognized as a diagnosis in the US (or in most places outside of the German speaking parts of Europe)until 1994 (and even then most of the dummies who make up the American mental health profession never heard of aspergers until about a decade later).

So...yes... at least two generations of American aspies, and other type I autistics, grew up unrecognized between 1960, and 2004. And being unrecognized meant being unsupported.

So obviously folks in those two generations are only now learning about how they did NOT get proper support.



BTDT
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 26 Jul 2010
Age: 57
Gender: Female
Posts: 6,620

04 Feb 2017, 9:38 am

Temple Grandin was lucky to be born in wealth and in a place where she could access the most modern mental health professionals of the time.

Temple Grandin was born in Boston, Massachusetts, into a highly educated and wealthy family.

Contrary to widely published reports, Grandin was never formally diagnosed with autism in childhood or in youth



Adamantium
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 6 Feb 2013
Age: 1020
Gender: Female
Posts: 5,863
Location: Erehwon

04 Feb 2017, 9:41 am

kraftiekortie wrote:
I have learned to just enjoy myself on my terms.


One of the great secrets of life, that.


_________________
Don't believe the gender note under my avatar. A WP bug means I can't fix it.


Niall
Velociraptor
Velociraptor

User avatar

Joined: 12 Feb 2011
Age: 48
Gender: Male
Posts: 478
Location: Forth Estuary Area, Western Palearctic Archipelago, Sol III, Orion Spur, Milky Way

04 Feb 2017, 9:50 am

Shahunshah wrote:
This idea has just occurred to me and I am beginning to wonder whether it is the case. Over the months I have been on wrong planet I am beginning to notice a trend, that being many people in their 30s, 40s, 50s and 60s have struggled to adapt in time to the world around them due to being misunderstood at an early age. I am beginning to wonder could this be some big phenomenon in the autistic community whereby a generation of baby boomers have been left behind and deprived of support?


This is certainly my experience, but a data point of one is not a statistic.

This study would seem to support your hypothesis (although it's about PDD-NOS, not AS): https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21713590

If anything, long-term social prognosis is not good even with diagnosis and intervention.


_________________
Stuck on some pre-FTL rationality-forsaken mudball in the Orion Spur. Ecological collapse (dominant-species induced major extinction event) imminent. Requesting passage to any post-scarcity biological civ. Beacon status: ACTIVE. Can tell stories.


Dear_one
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 2 Feb 2008
Age: 71
Gender: Male
Posts: 3,876
Location: Where the Great Plains meet the Northern Pines

04 Feb 2017, 10:41 am

Most talent has been wasted throughout history. It also takes great luck to find the right people to interact with. I'm not yet impressed with the results of the professionals who make a living trying to help us now, either. There's a lot more focus on teaching us stuff that is hard to learn instead of finding partners who can team up with us to make our unique talents useful.



BTDT
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 26 Jul 2010
Age: 57
Gender: Female
Posts: 6,620

04 Feb 2017, 10:48 am

That is the the privilege of the wealthy. They have the time and money to find really good personal instructors for their children.



the_phoenix
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 30 Jan 2008
Gender: Female
Posts: 2,489
Location: up from the ashes

04 Feb 2017, 12:03 pm

Dear_one wrote:
Most talent has been wasted throughout history. It also takes great luck to find the right people to interact with. I'm not yet impressed with the results of the professionals who make a living trying to help us now, either. There's a lot more focus on teaching us stuff that is hard to learn instead of finding partners who can team up with us to make our unique talents useful.


That's because if they made it easy for you to learn
and you actually succeeded,
you would become independent from your teacher,
such that your teacher would no longer earn money teaching you.

I've learned well over the years because in large measure,
I've been my own teacher.



Dear_one
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 2 Feb 2008
Age: 71
Gender: Male
Posts: 3,876
Location: Where the Great Plains meet the Northern Pines

04 Feb 2017, 12:45 pm

the_phoenix wrote:

That's because if they made it easy for you to learn
and you actually succeeded,
you would become independent from your teacher,
such that your teacher would no longer earn money teaching you.

I've learned well over the years because in large measure,
I've been my own teacher.


Me too. I'm a high school dropout, but I've lectured to graduating engineers and gotten applause. Bad education is planned from the top not so much to employ more teachers as to hobble independence and democracy. The bad teachers are just selected for having enough Dunning-Kruger that they know not what they do.



ASPartOfMe
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 25 Aug 2013
Age: 63
Gender: Male
Posts: 22,684
Location: Long Island, New York

04 Feb 2017, 3:04 pm

We were not "lost", we were never known about in the first place. Although changing there is still significant belief that we do not exist.


_________________
Professionally Identified and joined WP August 26, 2013
DSM 5: Autism Spectrum Disorder, DSM IV: Aspergers Moderate Severity

My autism is not a superpower. It also isn’t some kind of god-forsaken, endless fountain of suffering inflicted on my family. It’s just part of who I am as a person. - Sara Luterman


horseguy2u
Tufted Titmouse
Tufted Titmouse

User avatar

Joined: 31 Jan 2017
Gender: Male
Posts: 40
Location: Pennsylvania USA

04 Feb 2017, 3:07 pm

ASPartOfMe wrote:
We were not "lost", we were never known about in the first place. Although changing there is still significant belief that we do not exist.


Yes.


_________________
Socialization is overrated.


Surf Rider
Blue Jay
Blue Jay

User avatar

Joined: 1 Feb 2017
Gender: Male
Posts: 97
Location: California

04 Feb 2017, 4:10 pm

If I were an evolutionary biologist or an evolutionary psychologist, I'd say that natural selection in our particular environment favors people who do not have autism. And beyond that, it favors people who are 100% psychologically healthy, which would mean they don't have any mental disorders at all. Disorders are, in a way, political and social constructs, because Nature doesn't know anything about disorders, but it does know about survival and reproduction.

When a trait becomes unfavorable for survival or reproduction, the trait disappears from the population over many generations. If autism continues to be considered an unfavorable trait by natural selection, which is does seem to be now, then we may see autism disappear in 300 generations.

Something that's strange to me is that, even though homosexuality occurs about as frequently as autism - about 1% of the population - homosexuality is not considered to be a disorder, while autism is considered to be a disorder. Why is that? If two conditions occur at the same rate, why is one considered normal and the other is considered a disorder? The answer is: politics. This is a purely political decision, and separating "normal" from "pathological" is more about the values of society than about scientific reality.

And we live in a society that doesn't put a lot of value on autistic traits.


_________________
Your neurodiverse (Aspie) score: 107 of 200
Your neurotypical (non-autistic) score: 122 of 200
You seem to have both neurodiverse and neurotypical traits


Dear_one
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 2 Feb 2008
Age: 71
Gender: Male
Posts: 3,876
Location: Where the Great Plains meet the Northern Pines

04 Feb 2017, 5:11 pm

Surf Rider wrote:

Something that's strange to me is that, even though homosexuality occurs about as frequently as autism - about 1% of the population - homosexuality is not considered to be a disorder, while autism is considered to be a disorder. Why is that? If two conditions occur at the same rate, why is one considered normal and the other is considered a disorder? The answer is: politics. This is a purely political decision, and separating "normal" from "pathological" is more about the values of society than about scientific reality.
.


Actually, homosexuality is about 10%, with a gradual progression to heterosexuality. Also, it is still considered a disorder in some countries, and was in many until recently. A disorder is that which makes normal functioning improbable.



BTDT
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 26 Jul 2010
Age: 57
Gender: Female
Posts: 6,620

04 Feb 2017, 5:38 pm

https://www.mentalhelp.net/articles/sch ... -patterns/
Schizophrenia has an incidence similar to autism.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Handedness
Left handedness has a incidence similar to homosexuality, while cross dominance has an incidence similar to autism.



Last edited by BTDT on 04 Feb 2017, 6:01 pm, edited 1 time in total.

naturalplastic
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 26 Aug 2010
Age: 65
Gender: Male
Posts: 24,043
Location: temperate zone

04 Feb 2017, 6:00 pm

Red haired folks are about the same percentage of the American population as autistics. And so is the proportion of voters who voted for Jill Stein. But neither of those stats has any bearing on whether or not autism is a disorder. Lol!