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Snowcone
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05 Oct 2017, 5:48 pm

I feel like my biggest problem with aspergers is that I often feel anger towards people for no apparent reason, and the more I think about it the worse it gets. It's like I get angrier the more I try to understand why or the more I try to get in touch with it. All this happens when everything is normal and everyone is happy and noone did anything wrong. Since I feel like I'm angry for no reason and everything is normal I try to keep acting normal, but sooner or later I feel like it gets automatically expressed or that I can give someone a look that indicates anger, and then it can result into tension or distrust. Usually if I keep trying to be nice things go well, but in some rare cases not. It is super exhausting to live like this really.. I wonder if the anger is a result of being super sensitive to the smallest reasons to be angry perhaps.

I also have a friend who suffers from the same diagnosis and also commented that if he feels anger he just cant stop and gets just really mad and doesnt know why either.

I am wondering if anybody else have similar issues and know anything about it? Is there anything one can do to fix it?



EclecticWarrior
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05 Oct 2017, 5:56 pm

I do. It's no longer as delibating as it was, but it's still an occassional problem.


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timf
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06 Oct 2017, 8:18 pm

I am wondering if anybody else have similar issues and know anything about it? Is there anything one can do to fix it?

Anger can be tricky because one expects an observable trigger. However, Aspies can have subtle expectations that even an unexpected turn in conversation can frustrate. It might not even be apparent that a trigger has been encountered and therefore it can seem as if there is no reason.

We sometimes plan ahead for conversation in social situations only to have things go in unanticipated directions. We do not handle “on-the-fly” situations real well.

It is usually difficult to find the peace to allow an anger charge to dissipate in a social setting. It may be helpful to pretend to go to the bathroom and get some alone time and use it to reflect on what might have contributed to the frustration underlying the anger. If nothing else, a few minutes alone can take a little of the edge off.

I found this free ebook helpful;

http://ems-publishing.com/ebooks/atil_09_2017.pdf