"Aucorigia", "aucory" - my look at ASD and "similars"

Page 1 of 2 [ 27 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next

nca14
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 27 Oct 2014
Age: 31
Gender: Male
Posts: 3,586
Location: Poland

11 Jan 2018, 2:12 pm

I think that there should be one word for ASD and similar conditions, like so-called nonverbal learning disability (NLD, NVLD) and social communication disorder (SCD) from DSM-V.

I coined the terms "aucorigia" and "aucory" and use them to describe heterogenous group of developmental conditions characterised by social inadequacy and peculiarity (from "autocontrast" (contrast between intellectual abilities (which are quite often above-average) and level of functioning, level of social skills) and "originality" (being special, have "peculiarities" and "bizarrities" like fixative interests or rituals). Classic aucorigia is where an individual has above-average intellectual functioning (such as measured by Weschler IQ tests) but is socially inept and "peculiar". "Aucory" is broader term than "autistic spectrum" and some cases of aucory may be cases of, for example, personality disorders starting in childhood. ASD with general and "all-profile" intellectual disability is not a typical case of aucory, but rather "negatively" atypical aucorigic (or just aucoroidal) condition, whereas ASD with high IQ is classic aucorigia. "Positively" aucoroidal condition could be for example having some autistic traits (like tendency to fixative interest, prosopagnosia, sensory processing disorder (idiosyncratic sensory processing), having stims or rigid routines) but without social ineptitude present in ASDs or NVLD without socio-emotional deficits, but with visual-spatial deficits, dyspraxia, some sensory issues etc.

I think that DSM-V criteria may do not ecompass all cases of autism. What if one had only one trait from repetitive behaviors (like obsessive interests or sensory issues), but does not have any of three others? How common in general population is ASD (according to DSM-V criteria)?

I think that NVLD should have own position in DSM and ICD, but not in one category with learning disabilities. The name may be changed to avoid connotations with dyslexia or dyscalculia. It should form a cluster with ASD. Executive functioning problems, sensory issues, magical/bizarre beliefs, stereotyped behaviors, rigid routines were listed on some pages as NVLD signs or something like it. NVLD syndrome is a serious and complex developmental disability, like ASD. Severe NVLD with social issues is rather more disabling than mild ASD (and especially subclinical ASD, ASD level 0). If NVLD does not cause social ineptitude or peculiarity (also in adolescence and adulthood), then it does not look aucorigic, but only aucoroidal, because it has some symptoms similar to aucorigia (such as uneven IQ profile, clumsiness), but lacks defining traits of aucory which are social inadequacy and peculiarity. Social subtypes of NVLD clearly fall to the category of aucory.



tarunb
Butterfly
Butterfly

Joined: 11 Jan 2018
Age: 20
Gender: Male
Posts: 14
Location: England

11 Jan 2018, 2:41 pm

I am not a really special or especially intelligent person i think, i have scd. I wonder if you can have something autism and hsve a comorbid intellictual diability and with autism have the fixated,narrow obsessions with the sensory processing issues or dyspraxia and have general aptypical behaviour without any deficits in social communciation.



nca14
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 27 Oct 2014
Age: 31
Gender: Male
Posts: 3,586
Location: Poland

12 Jan 2018, 5:21 pm

I suppose that some autistic people may not fulfil DSM-V criteria. "Aucorigia" covers more people than ASD. NVLD can be described as some sort of pervasive developmental disorder (maybe not always a PDD according to ICD-10 or DSM-IV criteria). I would consider NVLD a pervasive developmental disorder, not a specific developmental disorder or a combination of it. I want to see "nonverbal learning disability" in one subcategory of developmental disorders with ASD. NVLD appears to be really destructive disorder. I consider NVLD and ASD aucoric conditions, but dyslexia and ADHD are generally nonaucorigic developmental disorders. I even would consider NVLD with social ineptitude more typical form of aucory than ASD.

People with ASD quite often have strong visualisational abilities, while in NVLD these abilities tend to be rather poor. Schizoid disorder starting in childhood appears to be a sort of aucory too. Same with childhood-onset schizophrenia (which can be associated with deficit in social skills). I would even say that neurotypical people can also have aucorigia. I admit that I may have problems with definition of aucorigia. It should be quite inclusive category of disorders. I also postulate the existence of "broader aucorigia phenotype" ("aucoridia"). I think that people with all forms of aucorigia should have help in their difficulties.



nca14
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 27 Oct 2014
Age: 31
Gender: Male
Posts: 3,586
Location: Poland

14 Jan 2018, 2:16 pm

I think that it is bad that in diagnostic manuals there are no one category for all childhood-onset conditions characterised by social inadequacy and peculiarity. Social NVLD, SCD, ASD should have one labelling. I suppose that NVLD or SCD can be worse than mild autism spectrum disorder.

I met descriptions of NVLD which present it as clearly aucorigic condition. This is one of examples (from http://www.aane.org/aspergers-disorder- ... s-related/) with my emphasis:

Quote:
A. NVLD can be conceptualized as an imbalance in thinking skills—intact linear, detail oriented, automatic processing with impaired appreciation of the big picture, gestalt or underlying theme.

B. It is not nearly as common as language-based learning disabilities, but this may be a phenomenon created by environmental demands (i.e. our societal demands for precision skills in reading assure that even the most subtle language-based LD cases are identified)

C. Typically social/psychiatric concerns are raised before academic problems are identified.

D. While the overlap is not complete, NVLD children may meet the criteria for Pervasive Developmental Disorder Not Otherwise Specified (PDD NOS), Aspergers Disorder, or Schizotypal Personality.

Quote:
Neuropsychological Profile:
* Full range of IQ
* Visual spatial deficits are most pronounced: poor appreciation of gestalt, poor appreciation of body in space, sometimes left side inattention/neglect, may have highly developed but ritualized drawing skills that are extremely detail oriented.
* Rote linguistic skills are normal (i.e. repetition, naming, fluency, syntactic comprehension), but pragmatic use of language is impaired: weak grasp of inference, little content, disorganized narrative despite good vocabulary and grammar. Rote recall of a story may be good, but the main point missed. Rhythm, volume, and prosody of speech are often disturbed.
* Motor and sensory findings are common: usually poor fine and gross motor coordination, left side worse than right.
* Attention is usually reported to be impaired and testing supports this, but the affect is desultory as opposed to distractingly impulsive, as in ADHD. It is as if people with NVLD do not know what to attend to, but once focused, can sustain attention to detail. The distinction between figure and ground is disturbed, resulting in attention errors.

Quote:
Social/emotional issues:
*Peer relations are typically the greatest area of impairment; may play with much older or younger children than with same age peers where they must manage give and take.
* They often lack basic social skills; may stand too close, stare inappropriately or not make eye contact, have marked lack of concern over appearance, be oblivious to other’s reactions, change topics idiosyncratically.
* Children with NVLD are seen as “odd” children who “just don’t get it” socially They may do better with adults, where they act dependent and immature, but may not be seen as “odd.”
* They may show poorly modulated affect, not matched to verbal content.
* Lack of empathy and social judgment may shield them from fully experiencing the hurt of peer rejection, while the same factors increase the likelihood of being rejected.
* History of unusual thinking can often be obtained: rituals, stereotypic behaviors, rigid routines, and magical/bizarre beliefs.

Socio-emotional issues mentioned here makes NVLD a pervasive developmental disorder in my opinion. Condition which may meet criteria of PDD-NOS, Asperger's, schizotypal personality is clearly aucorigic. This description of NVLD fits me more than characteristic of ASD.

What does unusual thinking make in the symptoms of a learning disability? I would redefine the term "pervasive developmental disorder" to ecompass so-called NVLD.

I think that SCD also should be in one category with developmental disorder with "NVLD" and ASD. The name "social communication disorder" suggest impairment in only one area, while in complex developmental disorders, aucorigias there tends to be some areas of which symptoms are present: social, emotional, executive functioning and activities, physcial and sensory, cognitive and motoric.

From https://www.farvardin-group.com/media/o ... 626263.pdf:
Quote:
NVLD is not a learning disability in the traditional sense, but rather a life learning disability. It should be considered in terms of a pervasive developmental disability (assumes a severe, chronic disability that is present before the individual reaches the age of 21), rather than a learning disability. It causes substantial functional limitation in areas such as self-care, receptive and expressive language, learning, selfdirection and mobility, as well as the capacity for independent living and economic selfsufficiency. (Pamela B. Tanguay Nonverbal Learning Disabilities at School, 2002)


In the book "Nonverbal Learning Disabilities at School: Educating Students with NLD...", Pamela Tanguay, page 19, I found a sentence: "It is far more appriopiate to consider NLD in terms of pervasive developmental disability, rather than a learing disability.



nca14
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 27 Oct 2014
Age: 31
Gender: Male
Posts: 3,586
Location: Poland

08 Feb 2018, 1:55 pm

Saying that someone has aucory is somewhat like saying that something is a flying animal or a swimming animal. There are different flying animals: birds, mammals (bats), insects (invertebrates). Swimming animals can be fish or mammals (such as whales). Aucory is not homogenous.

I think that current diagnostic criteria are not good. Someone can make ICD-10 or DSM-V criteria for Asperger's or pervasive developmental disorder but may do not make DSM-V criteria of autism spectrum disorder. Aucorigia is NOT necessarily something which make DSM-V criteria. I think that people with NVLD should have similar life helps that have people with clinical ASD.

And NVLD is for me a neurodevelopmental disorder from the same subgroup of neurodevelopmental disorders as ASD. And I would place NVLD in another group of developmental disorders than dyslexia or dyscalculia. NVLD is for me "closer" to ADHD than to dyslexia or pure dyscalculia.

I would not classify so-called nonverbal learning disorder (NLD, NVLD) and social communication disorder (SCD) as "specific developmental disorder", but as aucoric disorders in one subgroup of developmental disorders with full-blown autism spectrum disorder. I think that aucory is good, useful concept.

Diagnosis of SCD may often does not ecompass all symptoms which an individual has. People with SCD may have sensory processing disorders or ADHD, learning difficulties or speech delay. They may have one of four features of ASD associated with repetitive and restricted behaviors.

Symptoms of aucory may be divided into five subgroups:
- social-communicational (dyssemia - impairment of nonverbal communication, problems with social reciprocity (such as one-sided conversations), social ineptitude and failures in social contacts, lack of friends, problems with pragmatic use of language or delayed development of speech),
- emotional and thought content (atypical, obsessive, narrow interests, obsessive-compulsive symptoms, routines and rituals, magical or bizarre thinking, atypical emotional reactions (such as paragelia - inappropiate, uncontrolled laughter)),
- executive functioning (EF) and movemental (EF disorders, attention deficits, sluggish cognitive tempo (SCT); hyperactivity, hyperkinetic behavior, restlessness, stims, tics),
- somatic (poor strength and endurance, perinatal issues such as hypotrophy or pre-term birth, sensory processing disorders and sensory idiosyncracies or problems with dealing with unpleasant sensory stimuli)
- cognitive and motoric (dysharmonic IQ profile, dyslexia, dyscalculia; clumsiness (to a different degree)).



nca14
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 27 Oct 2014
Age: 31
Gender: Male
Posts: 3,586
Location: Poland

12 Feb 2018, 2:17 pm

I would name NVLD "aucorigia subtype I" and ASD "aucorigia subtype II".
Isolated cases of dyscalculia, dyslexia, developmental coordination disorder (DCD), attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), stereotyped movement disorder (SMD), even starting in childhood, are not aucorigic, although these conditions may be ("secondary") symptoms of aucorigia.
ASD is always aucorigic condition, SCD also (although diagnosis of SCD does not contain emotional, executive and motional, somatic and cognitive symptoms). There may be only "aucoroidal" cases of NVLD without social ineptitude. Some descriptions of NVLD present it as doubtlessly aucorigic conditions. Broader autism phenotype may consist aucorigic and aucoroidal cases. Maybe the most complicated cases of ADHD are aucorigic. Developmental schizoid, schizotypal, schizoaffective, schizophrenic conditions may comprise cases of aucorigia.



nca14
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 27 Oct 2014
Age: 31
Gender: Male
Posts: 3,586
Location: Poland

02 Apr 2018, 10:53 am

Fragment from https://thedoctorweighsin.com/what-is-n ... -disorder/ (with my emphasis):

Quote:
During the meeting, attendees discussed available research data to support the proposal to DSM 5 and strategies for obtaining additional data. In addition, attendees discussed and approved changing the name of the disorder to “Spatial Processing Disorder” (Non-verbal Learning Disability) to reflect the fact that spatial processing difficulty is the hallmark feature of NVLD and what differentiates it from other overlapping DSM disorders. Further, this name change will disconnect it from the term “non-verbal”, which can create confusion since those with NVLD are not verbally impaired. Participants also discussed and generated a working definition for NVLD. The proceedings of the conference are being prepared for publication.

It is interesting if "spatial processing disorder" would ecompass aucorigic disorders. What will be new definition?

Maybe even more typical form of aucorigia than NVLD ("spatial processing disorder") is "social learning disability" from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SnJpqrNTASU. I think that it is bad name. Condition described in this film is obviously aucoric. I would not name it as a (specific) learning disability. I think that it is dangerous to name someone with the disorder described there as not autistic. There should be one category of developmental disorder which would ecompass "social learning disability" and childhood autism. So-called "social learning disability" is for me a pervasive developmental disorder, not a specific one.



nca14
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 27 Oct 2014
Age: 31
Gender: Male
Posts: 3,586
Location: Poland

12 Sep 2018, 3:27 pm

I wonder whether spatial learing disability cause social ineptitude, symptoms like poor or no eye contact, inadequate facial expression etc. If no, maybe it is only aucoroidal condition (or even not something aucoroidal, like pure dyslexia or dyscalculia).

NVLD is a serious and complex developmental disability, like ASD. For me there is the need of one subcategory for such a disorders. NVLD is like ASD rather than like dyslexia or ADHD.

Childhood-onset "schizo" disorders (such as schizoid, schizotypal, schizoaffective, schizophrenic) may form third large group of aucorigia cases (after NVLD and ASD).

Here: http://www.cnoslab.com/pdfs/Base-rates- ... IQ-PIQ.pdf was written that VIQ-PIQ split of at least 22 points occur in 5,7% of standardization sample (3,1% for VIQ>PIQ and 2,6% for PIQ>VIQ). I had exactly 22 points higher VIQ than PIQ. I suppose that larger VIQ-PIQ gaps may be significantly more common among individuals with aucorigia than in general population.



nca14
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 27 Oct 2014
Age: 31
Gender: Male
Posts: 3,586
Location: Poland

14 Sep 2018, 4:17 pm

I coined the term "polymixia" (from poly, poli - many and "mix") to describe developmental conditions characterised by problematic symptoms in many areas:
- social (such as being bullied in school by years or having lack of friends),
- communicational (for example having dyssemia - nonverbal communication impairment),
- emotional (such as intense special interests),
- thought content (for example magical thinking associated with OCD),
- activities (like stimming, hyperkinetic behaviors, restlessness, tics),
- executive functioning (for example problems with making decisions),
- somatic (such as poor physical strenght and endurance, perinatal insults, intolerance of gluten and casein),
- sensory (like poor bearing of unpleasant physical stimuli or idiosyncratic sensory processing),
- cognitive (such as dysharmonic IQ profile or intellectual disability),
- motoric (clumsiness or developmental coordination disorder, dyspraxia) to a different degree).

For me polymixias are pervasive developmental disorders in full meaning of that phrase. They include even more than just psychiatric symptoms (can have physical component in it, not necessarily associated with neurology). I am diagnosed with a pervasive developmental disorder and can conceptualise it as polymixia. I have more than one psychiatric diagnosis. Firstly I used the term "polymixia" to describe a group of aucorigic individuals with "schizo" symptoms, multiple-complex developmental disorder (MCDD, McDD) might be an inspiration to coin the term "polymixia".

Pragmatic language impairment is less-ecompassing term that social communication disorder and spatial learning disability appear to describe narrower group of symptoms than the term, label "nonverbal learning disability". I suppose that many or even most individuals with NVLD or SCD have polymixia. Polymixia is a counterpart of MCDD, it is the term even wider than MCDD.



NickRelson
Tufted Titmouse
Tufted Titmouse

Joined: 12 Jun 2018
Age: 64
Posts: 45
Location: Beverly Hills CA

15 Sep 2018, 4:42 am

Oh.


_________________
Hillary for Supermax! Biden (indiapers) for trusty in the Incompetent ward!! !! !! ! (I'm not without mercy)


nca14
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 27 Oct 2014
Age: 31
Gender: Male
Posts: 3,586
Location: Poland

18 Oct 2018, 4:42 pm

Social NVLD is for me a pervasive developmental disorder. I do not think that ASD every time is more disabling than social communication disorder or nonverbal learning disability. I think that some cases of NVLD are associated with greater general level of disability than some cases of clinical autism spectrum conditions.

I think that individuals with ASD level 1 with high IQ and no or mild deficits in functional language are much more similar to individuals with NVLD than to individuals with ASD level 3 with intellectual disability and with severe impairment of functional language.

ASD with high IQ is classic aucorigia. ASD with intellectual disability is not a classic aucorigia. NVLD is often classically aucorigic.



nca14
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 27 Oct 2014
Age: 31
Gender: Male
Posts: 3,586
Location: Poland

17 Jan 2019, 3:28 pm

https://www.yellowbrickprogram.com/Arti ... sorder.pdf - fragment from that page:

Quote:
The question we confront is whether NLD is a disorder that is distinct from Asperger's disorder, with its own social features, or whether it belongs within the autistic spectrum along with Asperger's disorder? I argue that NLD is distinct from Asperger's disorder and does not belong in the autistic spectrum.

I think that etiologically "NVLD" is different from ASD, but it does not mean that NVLD can't be a sort of autism and PDD.

I have the impression that so-called NLD is something more than visual-spatial learning disability, a condition with specific socio-emotional features which is present since childhood.
Quote:
As we saw, Rourke’s (l989a) theory proposed that the children’s social behaviors are the product of their primary neuropsychological deficits. He interprets the results of the Klin (Klin-et. al.; 1995) study as indicating that an
"overwhelming concordance between AS (Asperger Syndrome) and NLD was obtained" (Rourke & Tsatsanis, 2000,
p. 245; see also Gunter, Ghaziuddin, & Ellis, 2002). Rourke and Tsatsanis (2000) state that "a "strikingly similar
pattern of behavior and adaptive functioning" exists between NLD and Asperger Syndrome (p. 244). They conclude:
"[I]t is of note that there is convincing preliminary evidence to indicate a correspondence in the neuropsychological profiles of the two groups. The pattern of neuropsychological assets and deficits that is manifest in NLD seems also
characteristic of AS [Asperger syndrome]" (p. 246).



nca14
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 27 Oct 2014
Age: 31
Gender: Male
Posts: 3,586
Location: Poland

20 Jan 2019, 7:33 pm

Fragment from https://nvld.org/the-girl-who-wasnt-autistic/:

Quote:
I suspect that NVLD is just as genetically linked to Bipolar Disorder, OCD, ADHD, Schizophrenia, etc. as Asperger’s is thought to be. I believe NVLD and ADHD are forms of Asperger Syndrome whenever they effect social skills, and conversely, autism can be a form of NVLD.

I think that people with NVLD have PDD or sort of autism which may be not related to "bookish" ASD. NVLD is too pervasive and complex to be classified as a learning disorder. It has big impact on socio-emotional functioning.

I think that true NVLD is "spatial learning disability" or "visual-spatial learning disability" which can be not related to social ineptitude and emotional peculiarities. Spatial LD appears to not be an aucorigic condition. I think that many individuals with NVLD may be on autistic spectrum or have "schizoautistic" developmental disorders which are not related to Kanner's autism. It appears very possible that among individuals with ASD are much more NVLDers than in general population. "Loner" personality and special interests or stimming should not be attributed to any learning disorder, they are autistic traits (or symptoms of schizic conditions in the case of "loner" personality). Schizoid disorder of childhood is aucorigic, it might be considered as another name for Asperger's, just like "autistic psychopathy". I think that not all with Asperger's are "technically" schizoid, they may have more typical social needs than people with schizoid disorder.



nca14
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 27 Oct 2014
Age: 31
Gender: Male
Posts: 3,586
Location: Poland

09 May 2019, 8:41 pm

Fragment from viewtopic.php?f=3&t=167156#p3805374 (with my emphasis):

Quote:
The difference between non-verbal learning disorder and Asperger's Syndrome is blurry at best, and possibly only a matter of semantics.

Hans Asperger described what is essentially considered non-verbal learning disorder today. When the DSM-IV was compiled, for some reason non-verbal learning disorder, was defined essentially the same as AS was defined by Hans Asperger, without special interests, and Asperger's Syndrome was defined essentially the same as non-verbal learning disorder, with special interests and without coordination issues.

Fragment from viewtopic.php?f=3&t=167156#p3805842 (with my emphasis):
Quote:
In the psychology book I am reading right now, which highlights some of the differences between Aspergers and classic Autism, it says that the vast majority of people with Aspergers also qualify for a diagnosis of NVLD. Most people with classic autism do not. I'll try and find more information by actually looking in the book in anyone is interested (right now, just going from memory). I think that is interesting. Some parts of NVLD apply to me, but I don't actually qualify for a diagnosis of NVLD (and I have classic autism).

I don't know what the numbers are the other way around, but I would say a large majority of NVLD could also be considered to be on the spectrum as well. As said, there is not a huge difference between the two, and in that book it is said the label you get for diagnosis often depends on which type of professional is doing the assessment (as in, the person usually qualifies for both, but is given the label the professional prefers to use).



QFT
Veteran
Veteran

Joined: 27 Jun 2019
Age: 42
Gender: Male
Posts: 3,456

25 May 2020, 5:56 pm

I agree with you. The high functioning ASD have very little in common with low functioning ones so they are best diagnosed with something different.

Where did you come up with the word though? "Origia" misses the letter n before a.



nca14
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 27 Oct 2014
Age: 31
Gender: Male
Posts: 3,586
Location: Poland

25 May 2020, 6:39 pm

"Origia" is shortening from "original" and the part of the word "original", in which the letter "n" is present, is omitted because it is quite near the end of the word, so the core of the part "origia" is "orig-" and "-ia" is a suffix. First part of the word "aucorigia" is from two first letters of words "auto" and "contrast", and "o" is also first letter of the word "originality".

For me many cases of NVLD and cases of SCD are cases of the same condition as milder ASD. Schizo disorders (like schizophrenia, schizoaffective, schizotypal, schizoid) "probably" are also aucorigic when starting in childhood, before adolescence.