Does noise mess any of you up similar to me?

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Cratilla
Yellow-bellied Woodpecker
Yellow-bellied Woodpecker

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29 Jan 2018, 5:19 pm

Unless I'm feeling the effects of a very strong placebo, I think I've solved a confusing symptom I've had for yonks.

I get these things I call 'brain crunches' which feel like my head is collapsing in on itself. I do things like rock, cover my ears, shut my eyes, hold my breath, repeat things, make weird jerky movements, hit my head, can't think straight or function, etc. These things are because they make the crunch feeling more tolerable, rather than compulsive or non-controllable. Doesn't last long at all, then it's like I reboot and I'm ok again.

So I finally decided to do a symptom diary, after I didn't have any over the Christmas holidays (despite being stressed, tired and ill, so simple stress isn't the cause). I wrote down what had happened just before the 'crunch', then looked for a pattern.

I found one.

Vast majority happened at my desk (75ish people office, so it's noisy), but of those that didn't, virtually every single one happened directly after a sound (most often a complex rolling noise - hand-dryer, extractor fan, server room, etc.).

So I got noise-cancelling earphones. Crunches gone. Along with most of my 'mini crunches' throughout the day (sort of like aftershocks).

I stopped using them. Crunches back (so I ended that experiment).

After all this time, it's literally just noise. It's bizarre as hell, but makes some sense in hindsight. I don't remember crunching in my old job's original office of 40 people, but I did at my old job's next office of 100-150 people + open plan to kitchen area. Where do I remember having them out and about? Supermarkets, train stations... What noises do I remember having trouble with as a kid? Vacuum cleaners and flushing toilets - complex rolling noises.

Bloody hell brain. If you're going to do weird things in response to things, at least leave a post-it note to explain what you're doing, so I don't find it's something simple many years later. I'm currently somewhere between confused and relieved at finding some kind of answer.

Does this make sense to you? Do other people here react similarly? Just kinda want to be told I'm not crazy.

Image

^ Number of 'brain crunches' across days in January. 'Specific sound or desk' is almost invisible, because it exactly traces the total crunch line except 11th, i.e. it's a near perfect model of my crunches. 22-26th was when I used noise cancelling headphones (the other zero crunch periods are weekends).



artfulldodger
Snowy Owl
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29 Jan 2018, 6:36 pm

Yes, when I started my new job at the Chrysler transmission factory driving the parts tug that stocks the assembly line, within a few days I started becoming very irritable at night, meltdowns like I had not had for quite some time. while hearing protection is not required in most of the plant I work in, I have to have some. Problem is, I cannot tollerate things stuck into my ears like ear plugs. So I requested a set of ear muff style hearing protection. Kept getting excuses from my team leader and management when I asked if they had them for me yet. I was up near where I pick up parts from the dept that machine them when they tested then internal fire alarm/storm warning sirens. I had to slam on the brakes and cover my ears. The girl working at the station where I was picking up parts came over and looked at my wrist band and said "I thought so, your autistic. She has a son on the spectrum and had her suspicions that got comfirmed at that point. She asked how I was tollerating all the back ground noise from hundreds of motors, blowers and other machines running. I said not well and told her about the issues getting the ear muffs. She got the union steward on the phone and within 1 hour, I had them on my head! i wear them anytime I am on the plant floor, only taking them off for a moment or two when I need to talk to someone. The evening meltdowns and irritability are gone now. Still very tired, but I can deal with that by just going to bed early. I also use the ear muffs when in other loud areas such as a big model train show, sporting events and so forth that I enjoy, but need to lower the noise level to something I can tollerate.


_________________
AQ score 43
RAADS-R 221
Your Aspie score: 153 of 200
Your neurotypical (non-autistic) score: 59 of 200
You are very likely an Aspie


Cratilla
Yellow-bellied Woodpecker
Yellow-bellied Woodpecker

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Joined: 22 Oct 2017
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29 Jan 2018, 7:18 pm

Must say it makes me feeling better for the first reply be "yes".

And that's ridiculous artfulldodger how much resistance you got for ear protection! Good on the woman who sorted that out for you.

I'm the only one I've seen at work who covers their ears for fire alarms...

I'm glad it's had a positive impact on you. I'm looking into getting some discreet earplugs, as I'm wondering if cutting out noise could help me to deal with other things. I have a difficulty with unfamiliar locations (get into massive panics when something doesn't quite go to plan), meaning that I don't go out much other than work and home. Maybe will help.



AshtenS
Blue Jay
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29 Jan 2018, 7:20 pm

Sounds like a meltdown to me. What youve listed during your "brain crunches" are all common symptoms of a meltdown. For me most meltdowns are at least partially caused by excessive noise.