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firemonkey
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23 Jun 2019, 11:29 am

Given that present methods of doing so are problematic .


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Twilightprincess
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23 Jun 2019, 11:43 am

Perhaps there should be a return to the DSM IV’s numerical rating system which takes all diagnoses into account. It was a flawed system, but I can’t think of anything better.

Were you thinking in terms of enabling people to be eligible for various services who might not be otherwise?



firemonkey
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23 Jun 2019, 11:53 am

Twilightprincess wrote:
Perhaps there should be a return to the DSM IV’s numerical rating system which takes all diagnoses into account. It was a flawed system, but I can’t think of anything better.

Were you thinking in terms of enabling people to be eligible for various services who might not be otherwise?


Yes that would certainly be a reason. The emphasis should be on getting people the help and support they need.


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IsabellaLinton
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23 Jun 2019, 12:42 pm

I think that our individual scores in the different assessment tests should be taken into consideration when our needs are being considered, rather than an overall functioning level.

Our assessment test results are documented objectively in our ASD reports, by percentile measurement against the general population (...mine were, and I'm assuming that other people's were as well). Mine were also double-blind so there was no error or subjective interpretation by the doctor, and I couldn't sway the results with false responses. I think that is also the case for other people's assessments.

Our reports contain valuable information which is often overlooked in favour of one number, which does a disservice to our specific needs. I know it's rather difficult to identify yourself via twenty different functioning scores, but that's more useful than generalising people into three groups or ignoring the reports we waited so long to get.



firemonkey
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23 Jun 2019, 12:52 pm

There was no percentile measurements in the report I received . There was just a mention of ADOS scores, in my case social communication 3 social interaction 5. It increasingly seems to me that there is a wide variation in how thorough an assessment can be.

I'm not all sure the report I received would be that good in defining strengths and weaknesses.


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IsabellaLinton
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23 Jun 2019, 1:09 pm

firemonkey wrote:
There was no percentile measurements in the report I received . There was just a mention of ADOS scores, in my case social communication 3 social interaction 5. It increasingly seems to me that there is a wide variation in how thorough an assessment can be.

I'm not all sure the report I received would be that good in defining strengths and weaknesses.


I'm sorry firemonkey! I didn't realise that reports can vary so much in their format. Was there a written, anecdotal description of your clinical presentation with the report, or just those the numbers? Perhaps you can contact the assessment doctor and ask if she has sub-scores on file, or how you can get a more detailed summary while seeking support services.

I'll add that even with my very detailed report I've been unable to find services other than an ASD psychotherapist and a referral to OT for Sensory Processing Disorder. I can't find help for any of my other needs, so at the end of the day an assessment level remains largely irrelevant for people identified on the spectrum in adulthood.

:(



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23 Jun 2019, 1:40 pm

There are different programs that some people are eligible for, like transportation and help with daily tasks (cleaning, cooking, and grocery shopping).

I don’t know a whole lot about this stuff. Often times, a person can get a social worker who can tell him or her what services are offered in the area. I had a social worker for awhile who helped me get some things in my life in order. Any mental health diagnosis would’ve made me eligible for that. It was good for me at the time.

I’d recommend it for anyone who feels overwhelmed and needs help knowing what they are eligible for or help with filling out paperwork.

Motivation and focus can be really difficult during times of decompensation.



firemonkey
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23 Jun 2019, 1:42 pm

IsabellaLinton wrote:
I'm sorry firemonkey! I didn't realise that reports can vary so much in their format. Was there a written, anecdotal description of your clinical presentation with the report, or just those the numbers? Perhaps you can contact the assessment doctor and ask if she has sub-scores on file, or how you can get a more detailed summary while seeking support services.

I'll add that even with my very detailed report I've been unable to find services other than an ASD psychotherapist and a referral to OT for Sensory Processing Disorder. I can't find help for any of my other needs, so at the end of the day an assessment level remains largely irrelevant for people identified on the spectrum in adulthood.

:(


There was a very basic rundown , but not anything that could be called 'In depth'. Most of the report was just repeating back what I and my stepdaughter had said . At the end it did mention the possibility of my having dyspraxia .


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Your neurodiverse (Aspie) score: 133 of 200
Your neurotypical (non-autistic) score: 47 of 200
You are very likely neurodiverse (Aspie)


IsabellaLinton
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23 Jun 2019, 4:19 pm

firemonkey wrote:
IsabellaLinton wrote:
I'm sorry firemonkey! I didn't realise that reports can vary so much in their format. Was there a written, anecdotal description of your clinical presentation with the report, or just those the numbers? Perhaps you can contact the assessment doctor and ask if she has sub-scores on file, or how you can get a more detailed summary while seeking support services.

I'll add that even with my very detailed report I've been unable to find services other than an ASD psychotherapist and a referral to OT for Sensory Processing Disorder. I can't find help for any of my other needs, so at the end of the day an assessment level remains largely irrelevant for people identified on the spectrum in adulthood.

:(


There was a very basic rundown , but not anything that could be called 'In depth'. Most of the report was just repeating back what I and my stepdaughter had said . At the end it did mention the possibility of my having dyspraxia .


After my stroke I had services from Speech-Language Pathology, and I was amazed how much they cover in their work including executive function, planning and organisational life skills such as cooking and cleaning etc. I also had a Social Worker for my stroke, and my current ASD psychotherapist has a Masters in Social Work as part of her credentials. I agree that Social Workers can be very helpful if you are able to identify your needs.



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