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livingwithautism
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09 Feb 2019, 9:03 pm

Anyone here not hate it?



Arganger
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09 Feb 2019, 9:08 pm

How would someone
NOT
Hate it?

It's literally gay conversion therapy, just for disabled people.


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Diagnosed autistic level 2, ODD, anxiety, dyspraxic, essential tremors, depression (Doubted), CAPD, hyper mobility syndrome
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Prometheus18
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09 Feb 2019, 9:09 pm

I don't know what it is.



livingwithautism
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09 Feb 2019, 9:49 pm

Anyone who has actually had it not hate it?



CockneyRebel
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09 Feb 2019, 10:59 pm

I'm glad I didn't have to go though that 40 hours of abuse a week as a child. I would have hated it.


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Magna
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09 Feb 2019, 11:09 pm

I'll ask my niece when she's older. She went through it and just finished recently. Her parents say it helped a lot because they feel it was the only reason she was able to mainstream into regular school classes. Personally, I felt bad for her when I would see her and she would communicate in her own way and her parents would interrupt her and repeatedly tell her: "eye contact! Eye contact!" She's old enough now where I think I will tell her that she can communicate with me any way SHE feels comfortable with.


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"There is no love of living without despair of life." - Albert Camus

"Ain't nothing but a stranger in this world
I'm nothing but a stranger in this world" -Van Morrison

"Are you Bluish? You don't look Bluish."

AQ-43 (32-50 indicates a strong likelihood of Asperger syndrome or autism).
EQ-14 out of 80
Rdos: Your neurodiverse (Aspie) score: 173 of 200
Your neurotypical (non-autistic) score: 39 of 200
You are very likely neurodiverse (Aspie)


ASPartOfMe
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10 Feb 2019, 4:25 am

Magna wrote:
her parents would interrupt her and repeatedly tell her: "eye contact! Eye contact!" She's old enough now where I think I will tell her that she can communicate with me any way SHE feels comfortable with.

EVERY ABA defender and practitioner I have ever communicated with denies that they force kids to make eye contact and teach them to be neurotypical. Thier responses always run along the lines of “they don’t do it that way anymore”, “If they are doing that they are just calling what they do ABA”. “We only teach them to avoid dangorous behaviors” and of course the parents are happy. Yet somehow I keep reading stories like this.

I can’t prove anything but an important part of ABA is reinforcement by parents at home.

If you do intervene be prepared with a big fight and possibly being cut off. A major major social rule is that only parents make and enforce parenting decisions. Not friends, not uncles, not grandparents. SOME parents will listen to suggestions from extended family members but it is a seroius breach of protocol to go around them or try and counter what they are trying to do.


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Earthbound_Alien
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10 Feb 2019, 6:11 am

A form of behavioural training...I mean therapy.

It's happening all over the world, its called Socialisation when it's for healthy Neurotypicals.



DanielW
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10 Feb 2019, 6:54 am

Short story: I had it in school. I've got PTSD now and am in therapy now to undo it and re-learn to self-regulate and self-soothe.



Magna
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10 Feb 2019, 9:10 am

ASPartOfMe wrote:
Magna wrote:
her parents would interrupt her and repeatedly tell her: "eye contact! Eye contact!" She's old enough now where I think I will tell her that she can communicate with me any way SHE feels comfortable with.

EVERY ABA defender and practitioner I have ever communicated with denies that they force kids to make eye contact and teach them to be neurotypical. Thier responses always run along the lines of “they don’t do it that way anymore”, “If they are doing that they are just calling what they do ABA”. “We only teach them to avoid dangorous behaviors” and of course the parents are happy. Yet somehow I keep reading stories like this.

I can’t prove anything but an important part of ABA is reinforcement by parents at home.

If you do intervene be prepared with a big fight and possibly being cut off. A major major social rule is that only parents make and enforce parenting decisions. Not friends, not uncles, not grandparents. SOME parents will listen to suggestions from extended family members but it is a seroius breach of protocol to go around them or try and counter what they are trying to do.


Thank you for this info. Disagreeing with my sister is something I'm used to. :wink:

I don't know if my sister focuses on correcting my niece's lack of eye contact, fixating on it, because my sister has OCD and perhaps then she's taking it to a level that other parents in the same program don't? She told me the program my niece went through was the "California model" and it was the best ABA model to use.


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"There is no love of living without despair of life." - Albert Camus

"Ain't nothing but a stranger in this world
I'm nothing but a stranger in this world" -Van Morrison

"Are you Bluish? You don't look Bluish."

AQ-43 (32-50 indicates a strong likelihood of Asperger syndrome or autism).
EQ-14 out of 80
Rdos: Your neurodiverse (Aspie) score: 173 of 200
Your neurotypical (non-autistic) score: 39 of 200
You are very likely neurodiverse (Aspie)


DanielW
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10 Feb 2019, 10:35 am

Arganger wrote:
How would someone
NOT
Hate it?

It's literally gay conversion therapy, just for disabled people.



Seriously well said! :-)



EzraS
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10 Feb 2019, 10:41 am

I'm not sure what the difference is between aba and the occupational therapy I've gotten.



AceofPens
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10 Feb 2019, 10:54 am

The closest thing to official ABA therapy I've had is sensory therapy, but ABA is pretty popular in my area for autistic kids so I'm familiar with its practices. I see nothing wrong with it. I've only known young therapists, though, so maybe the older generation is still using outdated and harmful practices. My only experience with that kind of thing is dentists asking my parents if they could get a few hygienists to physically hold me down so they could do their work without me flailing and crying. My parents refused and eventually stopped taking me to dentists altogether because of the methods they wanted to use on me. People like that exist in all professions.

I DO know that it's pretty awful for autism parents to deal with all this flack from high functioning autistics for using it to help their kids. Everyone with autism is different, and all therapists are different. Some behaviors need to be reduced, communication improved, and independence should always be encouraged. I feel like the high functioning crowd is crying victim on behalf of everyone because of a few terrible experiences when the bigger picture is that many kids' lives are made easier by ABA. No one's defending abusive ABA, but there are aspects of autism that are objectively harmful and make the person's life more difficult than it needs to be, and good ABA helps with that. I mean, should we do away with psych wards in hospitals because of their history of corruption? Absolutely not. They serve an important role for many people and have improved in recent years.

In an unofficial capacity, my own parents came up with ABA-like therapies for me when I was growing up. The tasks were very similar to what I've seen done by therapists. I 100% benefited from it, and yes, it did make me seem "less autistic," but it has also helped me. My pragmatic skills and executive function are leaps and bounds better than they were when I was young.


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DanielW
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10 Feb 2019, 11:06 am

AceofPens wrote:
In an unofficial capacity, my own parents came up with ABA-like therapies for me when I was growing up. The tasks were very similar to what I've seen done by therapists. I 100% benefited from it, and yes, it did make me seem "less autistic," but it has also helped me. My pragmatic skills and executive function are leaps and bounds better than they were when I was young.


Do you know or feel that it might simply be growing up, learning and maturing that improved your pragmatic skills and executive function? I'm curios because ABA didn't really do that for me.



ASPartOfMe
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10 Feb 2019, 11:59 am

EzraS wrote:
I'm not sure what the difference is between aba and the occupational therapy I've gotten.

Occupational therapy teaches skills for independent living. ABA therapy tries to end undesired behaviors and teach desired behavoirs.

One can use ABA methodology to teach independent living skills.

Of course I have no idea what occupational therapy you have recieved and how it was taught. The vast majority of American Autism schools use ABA methods.


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My autism is not a superpower. It also isn’t some kind of god-forsaken, endless fountain of suffering inflicted on my family. It’s just part of who I am as a person. - Sara Luterman


ASPartOfMe
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10 Feb 2019, 12:35 pm

AceofPens wrote:
The closest thing to official ABA therapy I've had is sensory therapy, but ABA is pretty popular in my area for autistic kids so I'm familiar with its practices. I see nothing wrong with it. I've only known young therapists, though, so maybe the older generation is still using outdated and harmful practices. My only experience with that kind of thing is dentists asking my parents if they could get a few hygienists to physically hold me down so they could do their work without me flailing and crying. My parents refused and eventually stopped taking me to dentists altogether because of the methods they wanted to use on me. People like that exist in all professions.

I DO know that it's pretty awful for autism parents to deal with all this flack from high functioning autistics for using it to help their kids. Everyone with autism is different, and all therapists are different. Some behaviors need to be reduced, communication improved, and independence should always be encouraged. I feel like the high functioning crowd is crying victim on behalf of everyone because of a few terrible experiences when the bigger picture is that many kids' lives are made easier by ABA. No one's defending abusive ABA, but there are aspects of autism that are objectively harmful and make the person's life more difficult than it needs to be, and good ABA helps with that. I mean, should we do away with psych wards in hospitals because of their history of corruption? Absolutely not. They serve an important role for many people and have improved in recent years.

In an unofficial capacity, my own parents came up with ABA-like therapies for me when I was growing up. The tasks were very similar to what I've seen done by therapists. I 100% benefited from it, and yes, it did make me seem "less autistic," but it has also helped me. My pragmatic skills and executive function are leaps and bounds better than they were when I was young.


There is no one thing that works for everybody and things that are extremely harmful to most help a few. Most ABA therapists probably do think they are doing the right thing.

Most people have had some sort of behavioral training but not all behavoiral training is ABA.

I agree high functioning autistics hectoring and and calling parents Nazis have similarities to the refrigerator mother days of yore.

My disagreement with ABA is in part generational. I think ABA is symptomatic of the larger hovering parent problem. I was Autistic enough that my school threw me out because it was legal at the time. I had a few hours of play therapy a week not 25 to 40 hours a week reinforced at home. Both Temple Grandin and John Elder Robison would probably be labled moderate to severe today, they exhibited destructive behavoirs as children. We did not get ABA and became productive adults. I do feel all those hours of complience training while getting the “desired” results also teaches too much dependence on others. One becomes independent by bieng independent. One needs to at some point figure out what works and what does not work for them. This can not happen when one is constantly being trained. Fitting in for approval is more important then becoming an individial with this regiman.


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Professionally Identified and joined WP August 26, 2013
DSM 5: Autism Spectrum Disorder, DSM IV: Aspergers Moderate Severity

My autism is not a superpower. It also isn’t some kind of god-forsaken, endless fountain of suffering inflicted on my family. It’s just part of who I am as a person. - Sara Luterman