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AceofPens
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10 Feb 2019, 1:45 pm

ASPartOfMe wrote:

My disagreement with ABA is in part generational. I think ABA is symptomatic of the larger hovering parent problem. I was Autistic enough that my school threw me out because it was legal at the time. I had a few hours of play therapy a week not 25 to 40 hours a week reinforced at home. Both Temple Grandin and John Elder Robison would probably be labled moderate to severe today, they exhibited destructive behavoirs as children. We did not get ABA and became productive adults. I do feel all those hours of complience training while getting the “desired” results also teaches too much dependence on others. One becomes independent by bieng independent. One needs to at some point figure out what works and what does not work for them. This can not happen when one is constantly being trained. Fitting in for approval is more important then becoming an individial with this regiman.


That's an interesting perspective. I've never heard that critique of ABA before.

DanielW wrote:
Do you know or feel that it might simply be growing up, learning and maturing that improved your pragmatic skills and executive function? I'm curios because ABA didn't really do that for me.


I suppose it's impossible to tell in hindsight whether I would have improved so much without some of the more subtle interventions, but I do know that in some areas it definitely helped. When I had eating problems related to ARFID and executive dysfunction, my mom created tasks that forced me to think about food outside of meal times. Those tasks and the conversations we had surrounding them marked an immediate improvement in the way I took care of my own needs. They made me more independent, not only in ability but also in the way that I thought about self-care.


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lostonearth35
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10 Feb 2019, 1:57 pm

I've only mentioned why I hate it about ten billion times on WP. :roll:

I've read that some people claim it helped them, but they must either be lying or they're brainwashed. How could anyone lover being punished for something and can't help being or doing, not being allowed to be sad or upset when they have every right to be, or being abused in ways that would shock most people if it was being done to NT kids?

Every time I hear the letters ABA I die a little inside. :(



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10 Feb 2019, 2:04 pm

livingwithautism wrote:
Anyone here not hate it?



Sure there have been autistic kids who didn't hate it. I think it really depends on the therapist and the child and how they do it.


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10 Feb 2019, 4:14 pm

EzraS wrote:
I'm not sure what the difference is between aba and the occupational therapy I've gotten.


Generally, ABA works to change external behaviors through conditioning, and is well known to ignore the meaning behind behavior. It is focused on refusing visibility of autistic traits rather than making the person more comfortable. (Some things call themselves ABA to get covered by insurance, and aren't actually ABA.) The inventor didn't even think of autistic people as people.

Occupational therapy is meant to be focused on increasing skills and sensory management, and is (So long as they don't use ABA principles in approach)far more likely to be a positive, healthy, and respectful therapy.


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DanielW
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10 Feb 2019, 4:29 pm

League_Girl wrote:
livingwithautism wrote:
Anyone here not hate it?



Sure there have been autistic kids who didn't hate it. I think it really depends on the therapist and the child and how they do it.


I'm not sure I'd be willing to bet on that



League_Girl
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10 Feb 2019, 5:14 pm

DanielW wrote:
League_Girl wrote:
livingwithautism wrote:
Anyone here not hate it?



Sure there have been autistic kids who didn't hate it. I think it really depends on the therapist and the child and how they do it.


I'm not sure I'd be willing to bet on that



I've had therapy similar to ABA and I enjoyed it.


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livingwithautism
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11 Feb 2019, 7:35 pm

EzraS wrote:
I'm not sure what the difference is between aba and the occupational therapy I've gotten.


ABA is behavioral therapy used to teach new skills and/or communication. Occupational therapy is for life skills, sensory integration, and things such as dyspraxia.



ASPartOfMe
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14 Feb 2019, 2:23 am

States Skirting Obligation To Cover ABA Therapy

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Despite a federal mandate nearly five years ago, several state Medicaid programs are still failing to cover treatment like applied behavior analysis for children with autism, advocates say.

In 2014, the Centers for Medicaid and Medicare Services issued a bulletin telling states to pay for “medically necessary diagnostic and treatment services” for kids with autism, but stopped short of directly requiring ABA therapy.

However, advocates say that because some children on the spectrum require ABA, every state should offer coverage to those who do. Most states have since done so, but some legislatures have not allocated funding, even though they’ve passed laws that require private insurers to cover ABA therapy.

That inequity does not look good,” said Lorri Unumb, vice president of state government affairs for Autism Speaks. “It’s just critical that family finances not be a barrier to children being able to get this critically important intervention as soon as possible.”

The states that do not offer ABA therapy to all children who meet medical necessity criteria are: Idaho, Illinois, Maine, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Oklahoma and Texas.

Wilkinson, the Oklahoma attorney, said families can play a powerful role in the remaining states by requesting ABA for their children.

“Nationwide, it’s going to have to be a push from the advocacy groups and parents and family members of individuals who need these services,” Wilkinson said.

Ironically, Unumb of Autism Speaks said that the eight states without the Medicaid coverage have passed laws that require private insurers to cover ABA.

“I’m very optimistic that all 50 states will provide ABA coverage under EPSDT,” she said. “I can’t say exactly how quickly we’re going to get there. There is rapid movement in most of the remaining states.”


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Arganger
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14 Feb 2019, 9:29 am

ASPartOfMe wrote:
States Skirting Obligation To Cover ABA Therapy
Quote:
Despite a federal mandate nearly five years ago, several state Medicaid programs are still failing to cover treatment like applied behavior analysis for children with autism, advocates say.

In 2014, the Centers for Medicaid and Medicare Services issued a bulletin telling states to pay for “medically necessary diagnostic and treatment services” for kids with autism, but stopped short of directly requiring ABA therapy.

However, advocates say that because some children on the spectrum require ABA, every state should offer coverage to those who do. Most states have since done so, but some legislatures have not allocated funding, even though they’ve passed laws that require private insurers to cover ABA therapy.

That inequity does not look good,” said Lorri Unumb, vice president of state government affairs for Autism Speaks. “It’s just critical that family finances not be a barrier to children being able to get this critically important intervention as soon as possible.”

The states that do not offer ABA therapy to all children who meet medical necessity criteria are: Idaho, Illinois, Maine, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Oklahoma and Texas.

Wilkinson, the Oklahoma attorney, said families can play a powerful role in the remaining states by requesting ABA for their children.

“Nationwide, it’s going to have to be a push from the advocacy groups and parents and family members of individuals who need these services,” Wilkinson said.

Ironically, Unumb of Autism Speaks said that the eight states without the Medicaid coverage have passed laws that require private insurers to cover ABA.

“I’m very optimistic that all 50 states will provide ABA coverage under EPSDT,” she said. “I can’t say exactly how quickly we’re going to get there. There is rapid movement in most of the remaining states.”


That is a good thing, states shouldn't cover abuse.


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Suspected; PTSD (Treated, as my counselor did notice), possible PCOS, PMDD, Learning disabilities (Sure of it, unknown what they are), possibly something wrong with immune system (Sick about as much as I'm not) Possible EDS- hyper mobility type (Will be getting tested, suggested by doctor) dysautonomia


livingwithautism
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14 Feb 2019, 11:01 am

I have ABA therapy and my therapists are gentle and kind. They don’t ask me to make eye contact or stop stimming or otherwise make me NT. They teach me life skills and help me become more independent.



DanielW
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14 Feb 2019, 11:12 am

livingwithautism wrote:
I have ABA therapy and my therapists are gentle and kind. They don’t ask me to make eye contact or stop stimming or otherwise make me NT. They teach me life skills and help me become more independent.


Then you did you ask if anyone here didn't hate it?

I'm glad it works for you



kraftiekortie
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14 Feb 2019, 11:18 am

Not all ABA is the Lovaas "Discrete Trial Training" type of ABA where kids get "negative reinforcement" for stimming-type behaviors. Like getting slapped on the hand.



livingwithautism
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14 Feb 2019, 12:01 pm

DanielW wrote:
livingwithautism wrote:
I have ABA therapy and my therapists are gentle and kind. They don’t ask me to make eye contact or stop stimming or otherwise make me NT. They teach me life skills and help me become more independent.


Then you did you ask if anyone here didn't hate it?

I'm glad it works for you


How many people who have actually had ABA hate it? The point of this thread was to establish a theory of mine that many people on here who hate ABA have never actually had it.



magz
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14 Feb 2019, 12:03 pm

AFAIK, ABA is just a method of training - you can use it with different goals. So it may be used to teach one something useful or it may be used to force one to act against self.


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livingwithautism
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14 Feb 2019, 12:09 pm

magz wrote:
AFAIK, ABA is just a method of training - you can use it with different goals. So it may be used to teach one something useful or it may be used to force one to act against self.


So basically it can be used in a good way or a bad way. It is not inherently wrong.



kraftiekortie
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14 Feb 2019, 12:23 pm

It's not inherently wrong.

It can be used for not-so-good purposes, though.

There was no ABA when I was a child---but my mother used some of the methods. Some of them were okay, and some of them were not.