What can you do if you are abused by support services

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madbutnotmad
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13 Feb 2019, 11:08 pm

Hey
this is a difficult hypothetical question

However, I feel a very important one, as people with Autism and or mental health conditions
often get ignored or their credibility gets undermined to the extent that they just get ignored.

I was wondering what can be done if you are subjected to abuse by a health care professional while
frequenting their services?

What I mean by the term abuse covers more than just physical or sexual abuse,
but psychological abuse such as bullying, or provoking a person with anxiety to react in a violent manner etc.

I ask, as some time ago I believe I was subjected to abuse by a particular person who worked for one of the help services. I believe that the man was doing what he could to escalate the level of anxiety that I suffered
with the ultimate aim of making me react violently, perhaps with the goal of getting me put in prison for violent crime.

I did not react violently (as I am not a violent person. Some people have slandered me because I do martial arts.
So they think that because I do martial arts, this makes me a violent person).

I do feel abused by his treatment and believe that he must have breached some form of discrimination laws
against the disabled, or bullying.

What I find frustrating in many of these situations when people subject me to psychological abuse
is that I find the psychological abuse difficult to deal with as I suffer from high levels of anxiety,
and also lack the coping skills to deal with conflict. (people with autism usually do not have that part of the brain developed).

So when people subject someone with such a presentation of symptoms to this type of abuse, it is extremely difficult not to get wound up.

What I also find frustrating is that I know what they are doing is wrong, but due to sensory overload, meltdowns etc.
I am less likely to communicate coherently while under pressure or being abused.
which results in me looking like the bad guy, even though I am the one that is being abused.

TO make matters even more frustrating is that many of the people who decide to abuse me in this context
I can literally beat up because I have trained in a number of marital arts over the years, and although not bruce lee
I am more than a match for many of the people who bully me.

so I get even more frustrated.

nonetheless, luckily, I have never hit someone in such a circumstances.

I was just hoping that someone would know how to get such people sorted out.
So I didn't have to result to do something to sort them out which would put me in danger of being imprisoned
but also to make me do things that I don't really want to get involved with (As I do not want to hurt people , even the douche bags in this world, as this world needs love not more mess).



Zinnia86
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13 Feb 2019, 11:26 pm

File a complaint with the state licensing board



BeaArthur
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13 Feb 2019, 11:58 pm

Please listen to what I have to say thoughtfully, because I think at first you might not want to accept it, but even so, it may contain some truth.

People in support services have to deal with a wide range of people, and they will not always understand each client adequately. They also have some limitations as a person, and sometimes that will result in a client feeling abused (or actually being abused).

It is always okay to say to the agency "I think Person X and I are not a good fit. I would like to be assigned to a different worker."

Notice that putting it this way doesn't blame anyone and doesn't involve you in an escalating conflict. With any luck, you will get a different person assigned and can move on seamlessly. Anyway, it's worth a try.

Legal action is unlikely to be successful, and even reporting to a state board still leaves you with your needs unmet.


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magz
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14 Feb 2019, 3:43 am

BeaArthur wrote:
Please listen to what I have to say thoughtfully, because I think at first you might not want to accept it, but even so, it may contain some truth.

People in support services have to deal with a wide range of people, and they will not always understand each client adequately. They also have some limitations as a person, and sometimes that will result in a client feeling abused (or actually being abused).

It is always okay to say to the agency "I think Person X and I are not a good fit. I would like to be assigned to a different worker."

Notice that putting it this way doesn't blame anyone and doesn't involve you in an escalating conflict. With any luck, you will get a different person assigned and can move on seamlessly. Anyway, it's worth a try.

Legal action is unlikely to be successful, and even reporting to a state board still leaves you with your needs unmet.

This is very wise.

I had a somewhat similar situation when I was trying to get out of psychiatric misdiagnose. But everything I said was dismissed because I was "nuts" :/ - except for anything that could be interpreted to reinforce the misdiagnose. Confirmation bias, I suppose.
After a few months, I digged up contact to a psychiatrist who helped me with depression years before and I came to him for "second opinion", displaying all my doubts about the previous diagnose.
I ended up with the right treatment.

So yes, if the abuse is not obvious, it may be just inability to communicate. Asking for a different person may solve the problem without unnecessary conflict.


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