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Zubifish
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12 Feb 2019, 11:25 pm

Hey all! I was just wondering if anyone else on here is sensitive to cold temperatures, and if that might be an autistic trait? I have heard of some autistic folks being sensitive to heat. For example, they may refuse to wear a coat even though to most people it is really cold out. I myself have never experienced this, but rather the opposite: If there is so much as a light breeze—even on a summer day—I find myself getting goosebumps. I get cold very easily, and find myself always wearing sweaters (or housecoats if I’m at home). I also have to cover myself with a blanket when I’m at home. Sometimes I even wear it almost like a cape XD Is this just me or do any of you out there also have a sensitivity to the cold? And could this be an autistic trait?



shortfatbalduglyman
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12 Feb 2019, 11:56 pm

When I was young my precious lil "parents" used to make me wear way too many clothes

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Two years ago finished menopause.

Cold a lot more often



auntblabby
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13 Feb 2019, 12:16 am

before menopause, I was hot all the time. I still tend to wear abbreviated clothing except for the most freezing days.



Dear_one
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13 Feb 2019, 2:12 am

What Man-o-pause? I never noticed that change. I have small hands, which makes winter work hard when they chill rapidly, but apart from that, I'm fine. We get six months of snow here, but I prefer that to lack of sunshine.
I did suffer in the winter until I was about 20, partly due to fashion, but mainly because I was unathletic. Then I went for a walk that became a running snowball fight, and was surprised when we all arrived warm.
Building on that, I became a winter bicycle commuter. Sometimes, someone in the huddled, freezing lines waiting for a bus would ask if I wasn't cold, and I'd unzip my jacket to flap off some steam and explain that I had central heating. Only the extremities got cool.



auntblabby
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13 Feb 2019, 3:31 am

^^^you're very fortunate if you never had to go through that change of life, for me it was like somebody let most of the air out of my balloon. the energy was gone.



komamanga
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13 Feb 2019, 6:22 am

I'm like you. I was much worse when I was younger, feeling cold even in summer.
I wear so many layers in winter. I like to wear thick, hand-made sweaters that my mother knitted for me and a couple of layers under them because it's warmer and so that the wool won't disturb my skin. I wear thick tights under my jeans or sweatpants and I wear two pairs of socks. I never go out without a scarf and a beanie. My mother used to say I was like a 'cabbage' with all those layers.
I also buy clothes with blanket fabric to wear at home.
Despite all that I can still feel cold.



renaeden
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13 Feb 2019, 7:12 am

I'm definitely not looking forward to menopause. It's in my future - not long now.

When I was thin, the cold bothered me a lot. I used to work outside in 0°C mornings. That's not very cold compared to you guys in the northern hemisphere, but little old me suffered. Layering clothes is how I coped.

Now I'm fat, I love winter, it's the summer I can't handle.



Joe90
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13 Feb 2019, 7:36 am

I'm sensitive to the cold, which is why I like the spring and summer months.
I always say being hot is uncomfortable but being cold hurts. I'd rather be uncomfortable than hurting. In fact being too cold has made me nearly pass out before.


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Edna3362
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13 Feb 2019, 8:50 am

I have sensitivity to cold.
In my case I live in a tropical country -- as in there's no winter, and I'd still feel cold even if I'm practically living in one of the warmest cities in the country.


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Ms.Berg
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13 Feb 2019, 8:54 am

Cold temperatures are difficult for me too. I am outdoors every day during winter as I have things that needs to be done but I struggle.. looking forward to spring :lol: The temperatures doesn`t have to be very cold either for me to feel it.
I don`t sleep well either if the bedroom is cold.

It`s been like this for as long as I can remember.


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Dear_one
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13 Feb 2019, 9:24 am

I was also sensitive to heat until the first time I had to work in it, and got used to sweating. Now, I prefer cold because more clothing can always be added, but only so much can be subtracted.
I have a heat-loving friend who once risked death from hypothermia, but only knew that he "felt cold." His body was neither adapting well nor warning him.
When I moved here from a British climate, it took years to get a better sense of the difference between the degrees of cold. I had a friend come and help me when it was far colder than his usual limit, although we were far from alone. I had three similar winters in my early 20s, and didn't even know how to dress for the cold, eschewing a hat.
Even the locals will complain that they feel chilled indoors in early winter. They don't realize that even though the air temperature is the same, the walls are not radiating as strongly.
I think that once a body is well adapted to the cold, even one warm day can spoil the settings.



jimmy m
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13 Feb 2019, 9:36 am

Fat is an excellent insulator. When I was obese, I would often drive with my window open in the car during the middle of winter with snow coming down. After I lost the weight, I am very sensitive to the cold.



InquisitveJay
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13 Feb 2019, 10:26 am

Ive realised recently that I seem to be sensitive to the cold



livingwithautism
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13 Feb 2019, 11:17 am

Not sensitive to the cold. Very sensitive to heat.



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13 Feb 2019, 11:52 pm

I've always been sensitive to cold.
I got really sick every winter when I was growing up (one time being hospitalized for a month and nearly died), had my feet turn purple and blistery (Raynaud syndrome) and I very clearly remember the (many) times as a kid that I'd huddle under a (thin and ineffective...) blanket with my feet stuck in the heater vent in the house as I prayed for it to turn on so that I could get a little bit of relief from the painful cold that I was experiencing.
...and my dad would scream at me and talk about how I was destroying the planet if I touched the thermostat at all. If any room felt too warm in the winter time, he'd scream and snarl and demand to know who the culprit was.



As an adult, I have thick boots that retain heat far more than the $20 shoes (that were the best my folks would ever let me have) ever did, wool socks, heavy blankets, proper insulation in my house, and the thermostat is set at 74 degrees in the winter. f**k the planet. I need warmth.

I also wear a coat (at least a wind breaker, but I'll go heavier depending on the temperature) pretty much at all times unless the temperature is in the upper 70s or above. Sometimes, I even need gloves in the office setting. I like Under Armor liner gloves, since I can still type and use my phone while wearing them.