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MonaLyssa33
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11 Jul 2019, 8:04 pm

I have a lot of clothes that I will wear once and then realize, usually at work, that there is something about the outfit that irritates me whether it is itchy, tight in weird places, or just not fit right. Are there any clothing brands that you know to be soft and also professional-looking?


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Edna3362
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11 Jul 2019, 8:22 pm

Sometimes I do wonder if there is such shop. Or a clothing brand that focuses more on sensory needs.


I wish... I would've make one myself as much as possible if I had figured it out which suited my own sensory needs...

Mine emphasizes more on weight's material than texture though. I would've known the name of the best material for myself and study it. If I cannot make the clothes myself, I would have to ask a tailor skilled enough to do it.


And, I cannot afford any brands other than the mass produced or locally made ones.


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Mona Pereth
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11 Jul 2019, 8:31 pm

There are some small online businesses that make clothes that cater to particular sensory issues, primarily for children, but no general businesses of that kind that I'm aware of.

Also, Target is said to sell a line of clothes aimed at autistic children:

Sensory-Friendly Clothing Goes Mainstream With a New Line From Target
In the News blog post by Tara Drinks
Oct 12, 2017
"Target designer Stacey Monsen worked on the new collection. She says she knows all too well the challenges parents face when shopping for their kids."
https://www.understood.org/en/community ... rom-target

One of the many reasons why the adult autistic community needs to get much better organized than it is now is so that we can be an easier-to-reach vertical market for comfortable clothes and other things that we need. Also, we need someone to encourage a few young autistic women to consider leaning clothing design so they can cater to the rest of us, and to other people with sensory issues.


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IsabellaLinton
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11 Jul 2019, 8:36 pm

American Eagle used to have a line of super-soft clothes with no tags. I don't know if they'd be appropriate for professional wear, or if they're still available, but you might want to look into this option.



99praises
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11 Jul 2019, 8:54 pm

For women, j.jill is a decent brand for sensory. I have a couple long summer tank dresses from that store and they are really soft. One is made out of 60% cotton/40% rayon and the other is 100 percent cotton. The cotton one has no tags and the other one has a small tag that I don't feel. I wear a cotton T shirt under each dress.



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11 Jul 2019, 10:07 pm

Some or all of L. L. Bean have no tags and have some 100% cotton. They may not have professional wear. Their madras women's shirt, patchwork is nice and cool and comfortable.


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