Is Autism and Asperger noticeable on the phone?

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Does people notice you have Autism or Asperger on the phone?
Yes 38%  38%  [ 5 ]
No 38%  38%  [ 5 ]
I dont know. I never thought about it before. 23%  23%  [ 3 ]
Total votes : 13

Noam2353
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17 Aug 2019, 7:10 am

Well, for me, I very rarely notice people recognizing my Asperger through a phone call I have with them. Especially when they are strangers who dont know me, or some random place you're calling and the person in duty is answering your phone call
However, some people are more easily to be recognized that they have Autism or Asperger on the phone. I was wondering what signs could there be in our voice to allow others to recognize that through a phone call?
For me, I sometimes had a tendency to sound timid or shy on the phone, or simply had the impression of someone who doesnt have a tendency to talk a lot or be talkative on the phone. Some of these symptoms didnt lead to the thought of others that I have Asperger, but they realized I have some problem, possibly less serious than Asperger.
But, the biggest question at the moment is. Is it really noticeable on the phone to the extent the other person can clearly tell that you have Autism or Asperger?
Sometimes, maybe yes. But its not always like that, and to be honest, being able to handle phone calls without people thinking you have Autism or Asperger, is a very good feeling. I would prefer it that way, if people I talk to on the phone would never notice anything weird or strange about the way I talk to them.
If its someone who doesnt know me that I'm calling, I'm pretty sure chances are unlikely they would find out. But, if its someone who knows me better and we've had a few phone calls before, they might notice it more easily about me.
Have things been that way for you too, and if you can share a story about this or simply share your thoughts about the general relationship, between Autism/Asperger and phone calls. I think, there is strong relevance between the two, especially when you gotta talk a lot on the phone or handle a long phone call. I dont think phone calls to friends and family count, I'm talking about calling random people or people you dont know. I think thats where it can get difficult.
Thank you


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Arganger
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17 Aug 2019, 8:57 am

Considering the level of stress and stuttering I get on the phone, along with not knowing when I should hang up or other things, I think it's kinda obvious.


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17 Aug 2019, 9:06 am

Different autistics show different amounts of autism symptoms on the phone, at different times


Different. Phone recipients observe different things, given the same situation

Different phone recipients know different amounts about autism


The autistic could have flat affect, talk too much, talk too little. Literal misinterpretation.



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17 Aug 2019, 9:11 am

I think the difference is quite noticeable but perhaps not in the way you would think. As an Aspie, my phone conversations are all business. Generally they last for 30 seconds. When an NT is on the phone, it is primarily small talk and can last for 30 minutes.



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17 Aug 2019, 9:19 am

I don't think anyone notices autism. I do know I sound like an idiot when I talk into an answering machine. Talking into blank air makes my mind go blank. I'm good on the phone with familiar people.



Noam2353
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17 Aug 2019, 11:58 am

Yeah, I agree with what you guys are saying.
I think its not always noticeable, even for people who think they have very easy to tell symptoms. On the phone, people can do nothing but hear your voice. So whether they'll be able to find out or not, depends on what your voice sounds like to them and the way to respond to things too I guess.
Do you guys have a certain voice and change it accordingly depending on who you're talking to on the phone, or your voice remains the same with any person you are talking to?
For me, it sometimes changes, though not significantly. I sometimes tend to have a low, weak voice when I'm shy with the person I'm talking to, but that might be a very normal thing and has nothing to do with autism.
Certainly its a lot less noticeable on the phone than face to face, but can still be somewhat noticeable.


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17 Aug 2019, 12:19 pm

I believe its all to do with how educated on ASD the listener is.
Otherwise, most NT people who do not have an in-depth knowledge may simple just think
the ASD sufferer is a little eccentric or strange, or on drugs.

I believe the two most notable traits that are often present with ASD sufferers
are

monotone voice that doesn't fluctuate that much in pitch which can for some be monotonous.
When NT speak that often fluctuate in pitch more often, and are prone to express their excitement more
in voice and facial expressions. Where us ASD sufferers usually do not fluctuate and do not change that much
in facial expressions as frequently apart from if we get really excited.

The other aspect that would be noticeable to a trained ear is how most of us ASD sufferers are very tangential in terms of how we communicate. This again is due to the dysfunctional or less NT way that our neurological networks are wired, we connect dots that others can not see, and we jump from one subject to another without explaining the connections to others.

That can be noticeable to the trained ear. Although as you know, it can be hard for ASD sufferers to communicate if we are too tangential.
Hope that helps.



naturalplastic
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17 Aug 2019, 12:29 pm

I cant imagine aspergers being noticeable during a brief phone conversation. Unless you did something really boneheaded like take a common expression literally. Even in person you have be alongside someone (at school, or work, say) for days and weeks before an NT senses that there is something off about you.



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17 Aug 2019, 1:37 pm

I don't think it's very noticeable. If it were I probably wouldn't have passed my recent phone interview and gotten my first real job, which I will be starting in a week.


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17 Aug 2019, 2:03 pm

Nobody's ever commented one way or the other to me, but I have speech issues related to my autism that are probably pretty obvious over the phone. Too quiet, not clear enough, odd pauses, stumbling on words, taking too long to come up with what to say, all probably are signs that give it away for me.


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17 Aug 2019, 2:12 pm

I can't recall when I've had a phone conversation with anyone including my own family that lasted more than 10 minutes; usually it's less than five minutes. I don't ask follow up questions. I don't think to. Also, I frequently seem to "step over" the other caller or at least we will be talking at the same time. It's probably me, because I will admit, if the other caller isn't getting what I'm saying, or they're belaboring a point, I will cut them off. I guess I don't have a lot of patience for the phone.


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AQ-43 (32-50 indicates a strong likelihood of Asperger syndrome or autism).
EQ-14 out of 80
Rdos: Your neurodiverse (Aspie) score: 173 of 200
Your neurotypical (non-autistic) score: 39 of 200
You are very likely neurodiverse (Aspie)


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17 Aug 2019, 3:38 pm

IstominFan wrote:
I don't think anyone notices autism. I do know I sound like an idiot when I talk into an answering machine. Talking into blank air makes my mind go blank. I'm good on the phone with familiar people.


Oh. I've made a few blunders trying to talk to answering machines. Usually get phoned back with someone saying "Was that you who left me the wierd message on my machine?" Usually I don't know what to say. Once I had an idea. Think of the answering machine as a person. I said "Hello answering machine..." Not sure what the other person thought of me!


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17 Aug 2019, 3:41 pm

Though this may seem strange, the firse person to think I have asperges (He said he thought I had it) told me via his observations via chatting online!


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17 Aug 2019, 3:58 pm

I have to make calls sometimes at work. If they go according to the script I do just fine - since I already know what I'm going to say I can focus on prosody and sound ok. But if problems come up that require thinking while talking, it's harder. Then I might forget to vary my intonation, or repeat myself, or be unable to come up with the right words. And if someone gets angry then it completely falls apart.



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17 Aug 2019, 4:07 pm

I try to avoid phone calls. I prefer to go to wherever it is and see them, or write. A doctors or a dentist, I will traven to them if I can to make an appointment as I can't think quick enough on the phone. In real life, if I go quiet the other person can see I have frozen or have not quite understood or am nurvous... On a phone I have no way of showing, and I have had people get annoyed at me in the past, so I avoid phones.


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