Is this a good way to explain autism to others?

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Is my explaination a good one?
Yes 10%  10%  [ 1 ]
No 30%  30%  [ 3 ]
Somewhere in the middle 60%  60%  [ 6 ]
Total votes : 10

McGinnity
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25 Mar 2021, 8:52 pm

I thought up a simple way to explain autism, posted on it online and expanded on the thought a bit. I would like anyone's input on this who cares to share their thoughts on it.

Autism is the brain not clicking the same.
I think that this is the easiest way to explain it. There's a rhythm to the brain, and those who are not autistic have fairly similar clicks, similar rhythms to those around them. Those who are autistic have brains that click faster at times, slower at other times, and sometimes in a different rhythm all together.
Don't believe me? Pay attention the next time you see people talking. There's a rhythm, a beat, almost like music that fits different moods, and those who are autistic have a more varied repertuar.
So, again. Autism is the brain not clicking the same. But that's okay, and even sometimes needed in this world, especially these days.



Fnord
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26 Mar 2021, 8:40 am

Good enough for a technical explanation.  How about an experiential one?

"Having an autism spectrum disorder is like always being on the outside looking in.

Imagine yourself on a familiar street.  Inside every house, you can see a party going on -- people dancing, laughing, and socializing.  Every now and then, someone will notice you and motion for you to join them; but every time you reach for the door-handle, you find that it is only painted on (and so is the door).

All of your efforts to join the party fail because you cannot find a way to enter and blend in with the people inside.

Meanwhile, other people just like you are wandering around.  Occasionally, one may greet you and confirm your existence; but they are just as lost as you, and have no idea how to solve your mutual problem.  Some are friendlier than others, some are more hostile; but most are indifferent, focusing solely on their own plights..."


↑ How does that grab you?


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BeaArthur
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26 Mar 2021, 10:24 am

I tend to stick to fewer words, not more: Autism is a developmental disorder with an extremely wide set of outcomes and presentations, from quite dependent and intellectually disabled to superior in mental ability. Autistic people may have unusual sensory experiences, and difficulty interpersonally.

Most people have their predetermined, biased idea of autism, such as "Rain Man" or their extremely affected second cousin. I don't feel it's my obligation to educate them. I also don't feel it's my obligation to disclose anything about my personal or family diagnosis.


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Fnord
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26 Mar 2021, 10:29 am

I have found that "a lot" of NTs are not interested in technical details, but will pay attention to personal descriptions.


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Joe90
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26 Mar 2021, 12:53 pm

I have a sort of analogy for myself (an Aspie) Vs my cousin with mild learning difficulties but not Aspie.
I'm on the outside of the bubble looking in; my cousin's in the bubble looking out. That theory is quite self-explanatory.

Another analogy is with my cousin, the lights are all on but nobody's home; with me the lights are all off but everybody's home.


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Fnord
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26 Mar 2021, 1:22 pm

I was never allowed in the room, and I still got blamed for leaving the lights on.


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kraftiekortie
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26 Mar 2021, 1:24 pm

At Motel 6, they leave the light on for you :P

Seriously, I would go with:

A "high-functioning autistic" and Aspie would be ones who desire to be social and friendly----but are awkward in being social and friendly.

A Kanner-type autistic person usually does not desire to be social, even if they desire to be friendly.



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26 Mar 2021, 1:40 pm

Fnord wrote:
Good enough for a technical explanation.  How about an experiential one?

"Having an autism spectrum disorder is like always being on the outside looking in.

Imagine yourself on a familiar street.  Inside every house, you can see a party going on -- people dancing, laughing, and socializing.  Every now and then, someone will notice you and motion for you to join them; but every time you reach for the door-handle, you find that it is only painted on (and so is the door).

All of your efforts to join the party fail because you cannot find a way to enter and blend in with the people inside.

Meanwhile, other people just like you are wandering around.  Occasionally, one may greet you and confirm your existence; but they are just as lost as you, and have no idea how to solve your mutual problem.  Some are friendlier than others, some are more hostile; but most are indifferent, focusing solely on their own plights..."


↑ How does that grab you?

"On the outside looking in" is how I described to others how I felt, and that was before I knew about autism and what it is. Very accurate in terms of the impact on the social experiences, which for us high-functioning folks is the primary challenge.



IsabellaLinton
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26 Mar 2021, 2:21 pm

I'm on the outside looking out.

I very seldom wanted to look in. I think that made it worse, because I didn't learn to mask or mimic.