Aspergers is a form of schizophrenia?

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firemonkey
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02 Apr 2017, 1:49 pm

According to this lady.

The background buzz is really annoying.


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naturalplastic
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03 Apr 2017, 1:22 am

Not at all.

Needless to say that lady has it dripping out of her ears (she's so full of it).

Not that some folks (like apparently her for example) cant have both conditions as comorbids.



ZombieBrideXD
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03 Apr 2017, 2:40 am

No... Just... No.

Although sometimes i wonder about connections because my late grandmother was schizophrenic and most of my family kinda thinks im autistic because she was schizophrenic... I wouldnt know anything about that... All i know is schizophrenia and autism can appear similar but are actually two very different disorders


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1Biggles1
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03 Apr 2017, 2:51 am

Yes, very different, many reasons why children are seen as schizophrenic is because they can often be seen talking to themselves, when in reality they are creating a world of their own that feels comfortable in their own mind and verbally express those characters that actually relate to loneliness but if the physician doesn't know this many on the spectrum can get the wrong diagnosis.. I caught myself out at school doing this, was so lost in my mind i verbally said things in a quiet room and everyone thought i was pretty odd...
This is what Schizophrenia can be like:



Also combine that with many on the spectrum having hearing difficulties from a young age and developing tinnitus can often be misinterpreted as the above. I believe it is very different.



Ichinin
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03 Apr 2017, 4:26 am

I have a friend who is schizophrenic and i can truly say that he's nothing like us, there is even a distinction being made in the diagnostic criteria for Aspergers that the person should not be diagnosed with AS if they have been diagnosed with Schizophrenia, this usually indicates that comorbidity is not commonly found, and there is no common link like AS+ADHD or AS+Alexitymia.

Conclusion: She is full of crap.


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EzraS
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03 Apr 2017, 5:26 am

They're on the same diagnostic tree so to speak. It's been a while since I looked at the info and don't quite remember how it goes. And it might even be obsolete since dsm 5.

A lot of things sort of tie in or over lap one way or another. Which why a lot of autistic people have one or more of those things as a comorbid.

Autism, schizophrenia, adhd, dyspraxia, cerebral palsy, intellectual disability, epilepsy, nvld etc.

I have separate diagnosis for autism and schizophrenia. So they're not the same thing.



kraftiekortie
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03 Apr 2017, 6:00 am

Aspergers is not a form of schizophrenia, though both could co-exist.



firemonkey
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03 Apr 2017, 10:00 am

I am not diagnosed with either Aspergers or schizotypal but could be said to, at least, have traits of both .
I know several people on another forum I go on that have both diagnoses of ASD and schizophrenia .

When I mentioned Aspergers to my nurse practitioner she offered up schizotypal as an alternative explanation.

I think ASD can be comorbid with schizophrenia/schizotypal which,I agree, is not the same as saying Aspergers is a form of schizophrenia.


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League_Girl
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03 Apr 2017, 10:46 am

Asperger's stopped being a form of schizophrenia when the DSM-III came out. You know what I mean right?


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creepycrawler
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03 Apr 2017, 11:11 am

Neurotribes goes into this at length. Historically, autism was believed to be very early onset schizophrenia until it was recognized as a separate condition. She seems to be confusing things - it wasn't renamed only to reduce stigma, it was actually recognized as diagnostically distinct.


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antnego
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03 Apr 2017, 11:29 am

As a clinician, I regularly treat clients with schizophrenia. Although there is some overlap between the negative sx of schizophrenia and the possible social/verbal impairments of autism, psychoses, consisting of auditory/visual hallucinations and delusional thought distortions, are not a sx of autism. A person could be both autistic and schizophrenic, but it would always require two separate diagnoses. A key difference is that while someone with autism may have bizarre/creative thinking, they still possess a "reality testing" filter that allows them to distiguish real stimuli from internally-generated stimuli (psychosis). Both groups may have a tendency to isolate, but for different reasons. Schizophrenics often isolate due to stigma/shame surrounding their sx, as well as paranoia (usually grandiose, persecutory or somehow out-of-touch with reality). Autistics isolate due to social phobia and/or lack of social skills, based in their "different" brain wiring. This difference in brain wiring and the misinterpretation of social cues can make it very stressful to interact with others.


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Last edited by antnego on 03 Apr 2017, 12:18 pm, edited 1 time in total.

EzraS
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03 Apr 2017, 11:54 am

My schizophrenia is auditory, but it's very mild thank goodness.



firemonkey
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03 Apr 2017, 11:56 am

antnego wrote:
Schizophrenics often isolate due to stigma/shame surrounding their sx, as well as paranoia (usually grandiose, persecutory or somehow out-of-touch with reality). Autistics isolate due to social phobia and/or lack of social skills, based in their "different" brain wiring.


I wonder how you would place someone like me. Paranoia(avoidant) and social anxiety are big reasons I tend to isolate. The paranoia and social anxiety stemming from negative peer reactions to my physical and social awkwardness as a child and,especially, a teenager.

I have been described as having very poor social skills.


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antnego
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03 Apr 2017, 12:15 pm

firemonkey wrote:
antnego wrote:
Schizophrenics often isolate due to stigma/shame surrounding their sx, as well as paranoia (usually grandiose, persecutory or somehow out-of-touch with reality). Autistics isolate due to social phobia and/or lack of social skills, based in their "different" brain wiring.


I wonder how you would place someone like me. Paranoia(avoidant) and social anxiety are big reasons I tend to isolate. The paranoia and social anxiety stemming from negative peer reactions to my physical and social awkwardness as a child and,especially, a teenager.

I have been described as having very poor social skills.


Social anxiety and paranoia are two different phenomenon. Having negative expectations about how others respond to you isn't paranoia, it's simply negative self-concept. It is possible that people could be responding to you negatively, although most of the time it's unlikely.

Paranoia in the classical sense refers to beliefs which are not consistent with reality, e.g., the FBI is trying to murder you and steal your technology, people are trying to steal your powers, etc. Paranoia arises from psychotic thought distortions you have no control over - it just happens regardless of social context. The suspicions arising from paranoia are usually impossible and completely inconsistent with reality.


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firemonkey
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03 Apr 2017, 12:37 pm

antnego wrote:

Paranoia arises from psychotic thought distortions you have no control over - it just happens regardless of social context. The suspicions arising from paranoia are usually impossible and completely inconsistent with reality.


Then how do you account for paranoid personality disorder(a dx I have)? It is not regarded as a psychotic disorder although brief spells of psychosis can occur.


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antnego
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03 Apr 2017, 1:02 pm

firemonkey wrote:
antnego wrote:

Paranoia arises from psychotic thought distortions you have no control over - it just happens regardless of social context. The suspicions arising from paranoia are usually impossible and completely inconsistent with reality.


Then how do you account for paranoid personality disorder(a dx I have)? It is not regarded as a psychotic disorder although brief spells of psychosis can occur.


The etiology is different and psychosis is not a diagnostic criterion in PPD. Personality disorder usually results from environmental triggers with varying degrees of genetic susceptibility. PD is often associated with developmental trauma and neglect. At the core of PD, there is usually self-hatred and rage. No such etiology exists in a psychotic presentation of paranoia - it's based solely in the imbalance of neurotransmitters and pervasive organic degeneration.


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Last edited by antnego on 03 Apr 2017, 2:13 pm, edited 1 time in total.