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Magneto
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08 Apr 2019, 4:13 am

Contstructed Language (Wikipedia)

Were a conlang to be devised for autistic people, what features would it have? How do autists use language? Would it be agglutinative? I expect that it would be designed to cut down on confusion - there should ideally be only one possible interpretation of what someone has said.

What phonemes would it use? Are there certain phoneme's that autists tend to struggle with?



epilanthanomai
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08 Apr 2019, 7:30 am

I mean there's always Lojban.

Personally I'm pretty passionate about the beauty of the flexibility of real human languages, though, even if the ambiguity can get frustrating sometimes, too.



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09 Apr 2019, 4:23 pm

I was in a little program for kids with developmental issues between ages 3 and 4 and the doctor running it introduced us to Blissymbols (https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blissymbols) which is a nonverbal constructed language. It has always appealed to me because, although I can talk up a storm, I'm nonverbal inside. The symbols are much closer to the patterns in which I think than spoken or written words and sentences. They are very concise and especially attractive to me because they are concrete, rather than abstract. Thus they don't lend themselves to labeling or judgmental or deceptive speech. Blissymbols were developed by Charles Bliss (Karl Blitz) a German jew who fled to England during WWII and he intended them to be a mode of communication that would not allow for subjective and inflammatory propaganda or other dehumanizing speech.

I've developed a verbal part of me, but it's somewhat artificial and not well-integrated with most of my mental or emotional functioning. Before I could speak at age 4 I was also sent to a school for deaf kids, and I had great hopes of being able to communicate with other kids there. I still love American Sign Language (although I'm extremely rusty with it - I was married to one deaf lady and engaged to another, but neither uses ASL), but have noone to use it with. I also love the German language (which is not a constructed language) because it has only a single set of roots, unlike English which has Greek, Latin and Germanic roots for many words. Blissymbols never became very popular or saw widespread use.



varikvalefor
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20 May 2022, 11:55 pm

After grokking Lojban, VARIK finds that Lojban "fits the bill" pretty well.


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kitesandtrainsandcats
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21 May 2022, 12:37 am

Magneto wrote:
How do autists use language?

I expect they/we use it in a way that blends our specific individual ways with the mechanism of how the language of the society we inhabit works. And the different languages of different societies have some dramatically different ways of working.


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