Page 3 of 3 [ 43 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3

babybird
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 11 Nov 2011
Gender: Female
Posts: 48,439
Location: UK

07 Aug 2022, 3:36 pm

Joe90 wrote:
It's one of the reasons why I don't want to get pregnant; getting pregnant can sometimes permanently damage you, mentally or physically. It's the equivalent to "long covid" except it's "long pregnancy" or something. My aunt had one child 30 years ago and her once strong bladder has never been the same since, and ever since she's always had to wear pads because of her bladder leaking.

I think I'd like to keep my body the way it is. Your body changing gradually due to age is different, but your body changing abruptly from pregnancy is scary.


That can happen to some women but not to everyone. I was told some horror stories about birth when I was pregnant and not of it happened to me.



Joe90
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 23 Feb 2010
Gender: Female
Posts: 24,143
Location: UK

07 Aug 2022, 3:43 pm

babybird wrote:
Joe90 wrote:
It's one of the reasons why I don't want to get pregnant; getting pregnant can sometimes permanently damage you, mentally or physically. It's the equivalent to "long covid" except it's "long pregnancy" or something. My aunt had one child 30 years ago and her once strong bladder has never been the same since, and ever since she's always had to wear pads because of her bladder leaking.

I think I'd like to keep my body the way it is. Your body changing gradually due to age is different, but your body changing abruptly from pregnancy is scary.


That can happen to some women but not to everyone. I was told some horror stories about birth when I was pregnant and not of it happened to me.


I know but the risks are there, same as when you get covid; you'll most likely recover but the risk of long covid or severe illness is still there for everybody even with the vaccines in place.

Some women have a baby that's born dead. It must be so heartbreaking when you're in the final days of pregnancy but already know your baby has died inside you but you've still got to give birth to it. Worst thing ever. Babies are so tiny and delicate, anything can go wrong and so many things do go wrong. I know that if I was pregnant all I'll be worrying about is the birth. I'll probably be fretting so much about it that the stress would probably affect the baby, which is the last thing I'd want.


_________________
Female
Aged 32

Diagnosed with ADHD
Have Anxiety Disorder
Diagnosed with mild ASD but I don't identify as autistic


babybird
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 11 Nov 2011
Gender: Female
Posts: 48,439
Location: UK

07 Aug 2022, 3:46 pm

Joe90 wrote:
babybird wrote:
Joe90 wrote:
It's one of the reasons why I don't want to get pregnant; getting pregnant can sometimes permanently damage you, mentally or physically. It's the equivalent to "long covid" except it's "long pregnancy" or something. My aunt had one child 30 years ago and her once strong bladder has never been the same since, and ever since she's always had to wear pads because of her bladder leaking.

I think I'd like to keep my body the way it is. Your body changing gradually due to age is different, but your body changing abruptly from pregnancy is scary.


That can happen to some women but not to everyone. I was told some horror stories about birth when I was pregnant and not of it happened to me.


I know but the risks are there, same as when you get covid; you'll most likely recover but the risk of long covid or severe illness is still there for everybody even with the vaccines in place.

Some women have a baby that's born dead. It must be so heartbreaking when you're in the final days of pregnancy but already know your baby has died inside you but you've still got to give birth to it. Worst thing ever. Babies are so tiny and delicate, anything can go wrong and so many things do go wrong. I know that if I was pregnant all I'll be worrying about is the birth. I'll probably be fretting so much about it that the stress would probably affect the baby, which is the last thing I'd want.


And not to mention the hormonal changes. I've known two women who had still births. It is devastating.



Dear_one
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 2 Feb 2008
Age: 73
Gender: Male
Posts: 5,495
Location: Where the Great Plains meet the Northern Pines

07 Aug 2022, 4:02 pm

babybird wrote:
Dear_one wrote:

A PS to that history rant - there are lots of unexpected consequences of progress. For centuries, the scribes necessary to commerce were a by-product of the churches. Then, the English Empire got so big that they made school compulsory to supply overseers for the ongoing plunder. Part of this literate population then started thinking for themselves, and organizing together.
Also, machines proliferate. Someone made a machine to cut the price of a bicycle chain 1,000 X or more, and suddenly it was much easier to make lots of new kinds of machines.


And the increasing costs of raw materials will be passed onto the consumer?

Do you think it will come to the point of a kind of survival of the fittest in manufacturing?


Who was talking about the cost of raw materials? Consumer prices have a lot more to do with the lack of true competition than the cost of extracting materials. We are also generally offered only the more expensive options, preferably ones that create dependencies.
Manufacturers have always had to compete to operate more efficiently, whenever the owners squeeze them for profits. Some companies can sell mostly smoke and mirrors for decades with government contracts, but eventually, their stuff has to perform to get another big checque, or they have to start a new scheme.
Access to materials is a big deal. Toward the end of WWII, the Allies had the edge in the air war because they had better access to alloying elements for their engines. After the war, the now mighty VW company's fate depended on them not getting caught with a stolen French welding machine, needed for the only available steel sheets.



babybird
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 11 Nov 2011
Gender: Female
Posts: 48,439
Location: UK

08 Aug 2022, 1:17 am

Dear_one wrote:
babybird wrote:
Dear_one wrote:

A PS to that history rant - there are lots of unexpected consequences of progress. For centuries, the scribes necessary to commerce were a by-product of the churches. Then, the English Empire got so big that they made school compulsory to supply overseers for the ongoing plunder. Part of this literate population then started thinking for themselves, and organizing together.
Also, machines proliferate. Someone made a machine to cut the price of a bicycle chain 1,000 X or more, and suddenly it was much easier to make lots of new kinds of machines.


And the increasing costs of raw materials will be passed onto the consumer?

Do you think it will come to the point of a kind of survival of the fittest in manufacturing?


Who was talking about the cost of raw materials? Consumer prices have a lot more to do with the lack of true competition than the cost of extracting materials. We are also generally offered only the more expensive options, preferably ones that create dependencies.
Manufacturers have always had to compete to operate more efficiently, whenever the owners squeeze them for profits. Some companies can sell mostly smoke and mirrors for decades with government contracts, but eventually, their stuff has to perform to get another big checque, or they have to start a new scheme.
Access to materials is a big deal. Toward the end of WWII, the Allies had the edge in the air war because they had better access to alloying elements for their engines. After the war, the now mighty VW company's fate depended on them not getting caught with a stolen French welding machine, needed for the only available steel sheets.


What's your favourite piece of machinery then?

I know you like bicycles



Pteranomom
Deinonychus
Deinonychus

Joined: 21 Apr 2022
Age: 39
Gender: Female
Posts: 342

08 Aug 2022, 1:53 am

Joe90 wrote:
I know but the risks are there, same as when you get covid; you'll most likely recover but the risk of long covid or severe illness is still there for everybody even with the vaccines in place...

Yes, but by the same token, pretty much everything caries risks. A friend of mine was in a car accident--the other guy was looking at his phone while driving--and was in a coma for a month. Arms, legs, hips--all of them broken. Awful. But we don't all stop driving just because there are risks.

Of course, there are lots of other good reasons not to have kids. But if you didn't do anything with risks, well, there wouldn't be a whole lot you could do.



Dear_one
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 2 Feb 2008
Age: 73
Gender: Male
Posts: 5,495
Location: Where the Great Plains meet the Northern Pines

08 Aug 2022, 2:15 am

babybird wrote:
What's your favourite piece of machinery then?

I know you like bicycles


I'm more fond of streamlined bikes, AKA velomobiles. They are more comfortable, faster, safer, and all-weather. My favourite, though, is still not built, although the technology is available. About the size of a large house cat, it could be built on a RC car chassis. The most basic model would weed a garden, nicking any green stem not protected by a fluorescent ring. From there, functions would be added until it was completely managing a patch of organic permaculture. It would harvest each stalk of grain and pod of peas at maximum ripeness, and save the best seed. With AI, it could plan for maximum land use and beneficial companion plants. With 3-D printing, it could be produced fast enough to save us from the current chemical mess. It could even be set to make the garden look great for a front yard.



Pteranomom
Deinonychus
Deinonychus

Joined: 21 Apr 2022
Age: 39
Gender: Female
Posts: 342

08 Aug 2022, 2:27 am

I like your robot idea, Dear one.



KitLily
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 7 Jan 2021
Gender: Female
Posts: 1,522
Location: England

08 Aug 2022, 8:33 am

Personally, pregnancy ruined my life and health for a long while. I was ill and weak at home for the 9 months, terrified, unable to walk far or go anywhere. It was very frightening.

However, I managed to give birth and breastfeed, despite being very weak after pregnancy. And my baby grew up healthy and happy (even though she was very ill aged 2-7 and I feared for her life)

I would say to people, think very carefully before you have children and make sure you have a strong network of friends and family to rely on. I didn't have anyone except my husband, who was mostly at work, and it was very lonely and exhausting.

But at the end of the day, a beautiful child is in the world because of me and the world is one person better off. I constantly look at her and think 'I grew you in my body. That is a miracle.' :heart:


_________________
I am here for interesting, meaningful discussions and thoughtful, rewarding conversations. I very quickly lose interest in long, drawn-out arguments.
***
I'm sorry if I get you mixed up with other people, I'm not good at telling people apart. Just remind me of our last conversation then I'll know who you are.


kraftiekortie
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 4 Feb 2014
Gender: Male
Posts: 85,032
Location: Queens, NYC

08 Aug 2022, 8:36 am

Indeed....that is a miracle.

I wish women didn't go through so much during pregnancy. I wish it was like a horse giving birth----very smooth, with no pain.

It's sort of a tradeoff, at times. Women have to go through so much having a baby----but the ultimate reward could be greater than it is for any man, who didn't have to suffer the rigors of pregnancy.



KitLily
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 7 Jan 2021
Gender: Female
Posts: 1,522
Location: England

08 Aug 2022, 9:00 am

kraftiekortie wrote:
Indeed....that is a miracle.

I wish women didn't go through so much during pregnancy. I wish it was like a horse giving birth----very smooth, with no pain.

It's sort of a tradeoff, at times. Women have to go through so much having a baby----but the ultimate reward could be greater than it is for any man, who didn't have to suffer the rigors of pregnancy.


The thing is, I read that human pregnancies are different to other mammals. With humans, it is a type of pregnancy where the foetus controls the mother's body- changing the hormones, weight, nutrition needs etc. to suit the foetus.

With other mammals, especially herbivores, the mother is in control of the foetus and just gets on with her life, sometimes at the peril of the foetus. e.g. rabbits and deer do this.

This also applies to periods. Human women obviously have continuous periods so we can have children any time of the year. The majority of mammals are only fertile once a year so have children once a year in the mating season.

This was interesting to me, but I can't remember the names of the different types of pregnancy. So no wonder human mothers go through so much: they are controlled by foetuses.


_________________
I am here for interesting, meaningful discussions and thoughtful, rewarding conversations. I very quickly lose interest in long, drawn-out arguments.
***
I'm sorry if I get you mixed up with other people, I'm not good at telling people apart. Just remind me of our last conversation then I'll know who you are.