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that1weirdgrrrl
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27 Aug 2022, 1:37 am

Is this a new MLA style? Or is this more like a generational quirk?

I was taught that proper grammar places all closing punctuation inside the closing quotation marks.

But lately I've seen an increase in placing the ending punctuation outside of the closing quotation marks.

For example:

I was taught "this."

But now I see "this".

Did I miss something? This is bothering me more than it should :|


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Dillogic
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27 Aug 2022, 2:39 am

What I've always done:

"Quoting non-speech text."

"'Quoting speech text.'"

'Speech text.'

Maybe right. Maybe wrong. I dunno.



temp1234
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27 Aug 2022, 3:19 am

I was taught to put the period (full stop) outside the quotation mark. I thought that's been the correct way all the time.

My friend said, "coffee causes cancer". <-- correct
My friend said, "frozen vegetables cause cancer." <-- incorrect

Could it be a difference between Pennsylvania and Queensland?

Edit: added a missing word



naturalplastic
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27 Aug 2022, 6:29 am

temp1234 wrote:
I was taught to put the period (full stop) outside the quotation mark. I thought that's been the correct way all the time.

My friend said, "coffee causes cancer". <-- correct
My friend said, "frozen vegetables cause cancer." <-- incorrect

Could it be a difference between Pennsylvania and Queensland?

I agree with this. The period marks the end of what youre saying. Not the end of what you said your friend said. So it goes outside the quotation mark.



Twilightprincess
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27 Aug 2022, 6:52 am

Quote:
Commas and periods always go inside the quotation marks in American English; dashes, colons, and semicolons almost always go outside the quotation marks; question marks and exclamation marks sometimes go inside, sometimes stay outside.


https://www.grammarly.com/blog/quotation-marks/

That’s basically how I do it.

More advice and examples:

Quote:
Put commas and periods within quotation marks, except when a parenthetical reference follows.

He said, "I may forget your name, but I never forget a face."

History is stained with blood spilled in the name of "civilization."

Mullen, criticizing the apparent inaction, writes, "Donahue's policy was to do nothing" (24).

Place colons and semicolons outside closed quotation marks.

Williams described the experiment as "a definitive step forward"; other scientists disagreed.

Benedetto emphasizes three elements of what she calls her "Olympic journey": family support, personal commitment, and great coaching.

Place a question mark or exclamation point within closing quotation marks if the punctuation applies to the quotation itself. Place the punctuation outside the closing quotation marks if the punctuation applies to the whole sentence.

Phillip asked, "Do you need this book?"

Does Dr. Lim always say to her students, "You must work harder"?


https://owl.purdue.edu/owl/general_writ ... rules.html


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Last edited by Twilightprincess on 27 Aug 2022, 7:14 am, edited 3 times in total.

Twilightprincess
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27 Aug 2022, 7:00 am

that1weirdgrrrl wrote:
But lately I've seen an increase in placing the ending punctuation outside of the closing quotation quotes.

Did I miss something? This is bothering me more than it should :|

I think people get confused since some punctuation should go outside of quotation marks some of the time.

Ultimately, it’s not a big deal. It normally wouldn’t hamper one’s ability to understand.


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MaxE
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27 Aug 2022, 8:51 am

naturalplastic wrote:
temp1234 wrote:
I was taught to put the period (full stop) outside the quotation mark. I thought that's been the correct way all the time.

My friend said, "coffee causes cancer". <-- correct
My friend said, "frozen vegetables cause cancer." <-- incorrect

Could it be a difference between Pennsylvania and Queensland?

I agree with this. The period marks the end of what youre saying. Not the end of what you said your friend said. So it goes outside the quotation mark.

If you call it a full stop then you're from outside North America. I recall recently reading that the standard differs between NA and elsewhere. There may be more confusion nowadays because if you browse the web in English you are likely to encounter content from all over the Anglosphere and it's not necessarily labeled as to where it originated i.e. what orthography standard the author's copy of Word was set to. Being exposed to examples of multiple standards could confuse some people who might not necessarily know all the peculiarities of their local version of English.


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Twilightprincess
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27 Aug 2022, 9:17 am

It’s true that there are differences based on country.

Quote:
British English puts commas and periods (full stops) outside the quotation marks unless the quotation is also a complete sentence or the punctuation is part of the quotation.

The UWSC says that British people write it "this way".

American English puts commas and periods inside the quotation marks.

The UWSC says that American people write it "this way."

When it comes to other punctuation, both versions write it similarly. Colons and semicolons go outside quotation marks, and exclamation points and question marks depend on whether they're part of the quote or the sentence as a whole.


https://www.unr.edu/writing-speaking-ce ... an-english

It really only matters if one is writing an academic paper. Usually, professors expect students to follow the conventions of their country, with understanding being shown to foreign students.

People who are unfamiliar with the standards of other locales could view these differences as errors, though, so it could be a good idea to follow local conventions. Obviously, this is not applicable to online discussions.


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CockneyRebel
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27 Aug 2022, 10:47 am

I put the period inside the quotations.


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Double Retired
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27 Aug 2022, 3:55 pm

I though some folk blamed it on us computer folk. Typically a computer will expect the quotes to contain only the quote (or, in computer terms, only contain the character string in question). If something not part of the character string gets moved in from outside the quotation marks then, as far as the computer is concerned, is becomes part of the character string.


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MaxE
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27 Aug 2022, 5:05 pm

Double Retired wrote:
I though some folk blamed it on us computer folk. Typically a computer will expect the quotes to contain only the quote (or, in computer terms, only contain the character string in question). If something not part of the character string gets moved in from outside the quotation marks then, as far as the computer is concerned, is becomes part of the character string.

This too.


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