Page 1 of 2 [ 24 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next

27 Apr 2008, 12:06 am

If it is, then that would explain why my mother blames my learning problems on it.



amaren
Sea Gull
Sea Gull

User avatar

Joined: 23 Apr 2008
Age: 33
Gender: Female
Posts: 216
Location: wallowing in bed

27 Apr 2008, 12:24 am

Any specific learning disability?
I suspect many aspies find school work etc hard because concentrating on something that isn't the obsession of the moment is tricky.
This is certainly the case for me, but if I'm interested, I learn really well.


_________________
The rule for today.
Touch my tail, I shred your hand.
New rule tomorrow.


Thomas1138
Velociraptor
Velociraptor

User avatar

Joined: 5 Apr 2008
Age: 40
Gender: Male
Posts: 488

27 Apr 2008, 12:27 am

It's not necessarily a part, but I've read that it can be.



27 Apr 2008, 12:38 am

I have troubles with school work that is abstract. I cannot do reports because I can't organize my work and it's hard to write about something, even if it's something I'm interested in. If only the teachers didn't make is so difficult then I'd be able to do it but no they make it hard. You have to use your own words, write certain amount of pages. I can't even think of my own words to say, words I say come out of what I read.
I also have troubles with answering questions out of textbooks because I cannot find the answer in it.
Algebra I am unable to do. I don't know if that counts as a disability.
I can do adding subtracting, multiplication, division, I can do fractions but I pretty much forgot how do to them since I only did them for a short bit. I was just starting to get a hang of them and they got easy once I finally understood how to do the problems and it was fun doing them, but then we move to Montana and bam there was algebra and I couldn't retain the information of how to do the problems. I was never taught how to do them. The school gave up teaching me and gave me easier math instead, the math I did in elementary school. I think I missed a huge gap was why. It'll be like having the child learn how to do division without teaching them multiplication first. I know square roots of course. We were starting to learn it in at the end of sixth grade but we were never given the assignments. I only know the basic square roots of course like square root of 144. But I already knew about them since fourth grade when I asked my mother what they were. I got it just like that.


School work used to be so easy, I used to be able to answer story problems, find answers out of textbooks, and then when i was about in fifth grade it got hard. The answer is no longer the exact words in the textbook, instead its in different words and you have to read between the lines to find the answer. Story problems also got abstract too, there are things in them you can't see and you have to connect the dots to figure it out yourself.



IdahoAspie
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 29 Nov 2007
Age: 45
Gender: Male
Posts: 729

27 Apr 2008, 12:50 am

amaren wrote:
Any specific learning disability?
I suspect many aspies find school work etc hard because concentrating on something that isn't the obsession of the moment is tricky.
This is certainly the case for me, but if I'm interested, I learn really well.


It is a learning disability, in part because, like you said, it is hard if not impossible to concentrate on something you are not obsessed with at the time.

It is also difficult because interpertrate what others ask and say differently than others would. This makes it hard to answer questions correct and do work as asked.



27 Apr 2008, 12:52 am

Well, they can read what I said in my last post.



Thomas1138
Velociraptor
Velociraptor

User avatar

Joined: 5 Apr 2008
Age: 40
Gender: Male
Posts: 488

27 Apr 2008, 12:57 am

Nothing you said raises any specific red flags. There are a lot of people who struggle in school who don't have learning disabilities.

The reason the questions are harder now is because teachers don't want to teach you by rote memorization anymore. The material isn't so much abstract as it is applied. You need to demonstrate that you actually understand the subject so questions are asked in which you must take the material you were supposed to have learned and use it to solve a new problem.

Think like in how video games like The Legend of Zelda you're given a tutorial in how to use a new item like the grappling hook. Later in the dungeon you're expected to know to use the grappling hook without the game holding your hand and telling you to.



27 Apr 2008, 1:04 am

I have been told by my mother school was easy when she was growing up. If I lived in those days, I probably would have done the school work with a lot less struggle without having it be modified. I think my mother said school work was concrete back then.

I wonder if I have a rote memory because I can't make something my own words. It's out of books.

I can remember my English teacher saying when you are reading a book to do a report, close the book and write down what you remember. Me I can't do that, I tried it but I always have to be right, the information has to be correct. No wrong facts.



Thomas1138
Velociraptor
Velociraptor

User avatar

Joined: 5 Apr 2008
Age: 40
Gender: Male
Posts: 488

27 Apr 2008, 1:07 am

In that case it sounds more like a obsessive-compulsive problem than a classic learning disability.



Danielismyname
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 2 Apr 2007
Age: 38
Gender: Male
Posts: 9,599

27 Apr 2008, 1:07 am

No.

With the right teaching, people with AS can do very well academically. Whereas, with the right teaching, it can still be hard to impossible for someone with autism to do well (speaking in majorities here).

Cognitive delay and/or impairment makes one exempt from an AS diagnosis.



Josie
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 25 Apr 2008
Age: 37
Gender: Female
Posts: 645

27 Apr 2008, 1:12 am

I knew I was in the wrong learning environment.



Thomas1138
Velociraptor
Velociraptor

User avatar

Joined: 5 Apr 2008
Age: 40
Gender: Male
Posts: 488

27 Apr 2008, 1:16 am

Danielismyname wrote:
No.

With the right teaching, people with AS can do very well academically. Whereas, with the right teaching, it can still be hard to impossible for someone with autism to do well (speaking in majorities here).

Cognitive delay and/or impairment makes one exempt from an AS diagnosis.


It depends on what criteria you're using.

But we're not talking about cognitive delay or impairment here in the sense of general retardation, we're talking about learning disabilities. There's a big difference between the two.



27 Apr 2008, 1:22 am

Danielismyname wrote:
No.

With the right teaching, people with AS can do very well academically. Whereas, with the right teaching, it can still be hard to impossible for someone with autism to do well (speaking in majorities here).

Cognitive delay and/or impairment makes one exempt from an AS diagnosis.



I was diagnosed with AS anyway. Does it matter what autism label I have?



Danielismyname
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 2 Apr 2007
Age: 38
Gender: Male
Posts: 9,599

27 Apr 2008, 1:34 am

Thomas1138 wrote:
But we're not talking about cognitive delay or impairment here in the sense of general retardation, we're talking about learning disabilities. There's a big difference between the two.


Well, autistic disorder does cause learning disabilities, which are directly caused by the cognitive delay (this is a fact); AS doesn't. NVLD does too in one facet. The cognitive impairment that a small number of AS individuals have isn't related to the disorder itself.

Problems with learning in AS are due to teaching; teaching that circumvents executive dysfunction, and the repetitive behaviours shows that people with AS can do as well in school as their peers of a similar cognitive pattern.

People with AS have a high prevalence of NVLD, and this can be why they have problems in certain areas.



Danielismyname
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 2 Apr 2007
Age: 38
Gender: Male
Posts: 9,599

27 Apr 2008, 1:57 am

Spokane_Girl wrote:
I was diagnosed with AS anyway. Does it matter what autism label I have?


Well, if you have a learning disability, it's not a part of your AS (see the thread title).