If you have Asperger's, do you also have "autism"

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Felinity
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09 May 2008, 12:48 am

If you have Asperger's, do you say "I'm autistic"? or wouldn't people assume that you have Classic Autisim? Wouldn't you just say "I have Asperger's" or "I am an Aspie"? or "I'm on the autistic spectrum"?? or do some people with Asperger's just say "I'm autistic"? or mildly autistic?

just trying to understand, so I explain it the right way..

Thanks.



foxman
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09 May 2008, 12:50 am

I say I'm high functioning autistic. It's easier.


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09 May 2008, 12:57 am

I prefer to say that I'm autistic. I don't like saying that I have something, and the word aspie doesn't feel like something that people would understand.

And anyway, if they think I'm classic autistic they have to be pretty dumb, because it is obvious that I am not.

Another reason for saying autistic rather than aspergers is that most people don't know what AS, but at least they often think they know what autism is, so it will bring more interesting reactions.



JasonWilkes
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09 May 2008, 1:01 am

Technically: yes. When talking to the average person, I'd say: no.

Vernacular speech often differs from the specialized mini-languages that develop in certain subcultures or highly specialized academic fields.

For example: The word "Atheist".
In vernacular, everyday speech, most people interpret the word to refer to a person who believes that there is no god (i.e. a belief, or assertion, of a negative), whereas almost every writer, philosopher, etc. who calls him/her self an "Atheist", actually holds closer to the position that the average person would call "Agnostic" -- (i.e. a lack of belief in a god or gods, but not an assertion of either a negative or positive stance).

So while technically, Asperger's is a form of Autism, saying so to anyone who doesn't already know a lot about AS would probably serve more to misinform than to inform.

:wink:



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09 May 2008, 1:03 am

I just say that I am autistic, for several of the same reasons as Tormod. If someone wants clarification, I'll bring up Asperger's, but Asperger's is just a more narrowly defined subset of autism.


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Danielismyname
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09 May 2008, 1:17 am

Technically, one should state the diagnosis that they have if one wants to give an accurate picture to the listener, i.e., saying you have cancer doesn't reveal much.



velodog
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09 May 2008, 1:19 am

I am on the spectrum, but too high functioning to be Aspergers, according to the shrink that I received my DX from. So yes, it is all related.



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09 May 2008, 1:21 am

JasonWilkes wrote:

For example: The word "Atheist".
In vernacular, everyday speech, most people interpret the word to refer to a person who believes that there is no god (i.e. a belief, or assertion, of a negative), whereas almost every writer, philosopher, etc. who calls him/her self an "Atheist", actually holds closer to the position that the average person would call "Agnostic" -- (i.e. a lack of belief in a god or gods, but not an assertion of either a negative or positive stance).


Thank you!


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Orwell
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09 May 2008, 1:23 am

Danielismyname wrote:
Technically, one should state the diagnosis that they have if one wants to give an accurate picture to the listener, i.e., saying you have cancer doesn't reveal much.

Maybe. However, whether I fit better into AS or HFA could be disputed, so why not give a broader term that encompasses both?


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09 May 2008, 1:47 am

I would probably say I have Aspergers rather than Autism. But I have never really revealed it to anybody so I cannot say what would happen.


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Danielismyname
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09 May 2008, 2:11 am

Orwell wrote:
...so why not give a broader term that encompasses both?


If you wish to (people can say whatever they want, of course).

I, personally, say ASD; Autism/Autistic Spectrum Disorder. It removes all of the stereotypes people know, i.e., nonverbal for autism, and whatever the current one is for Asperger's. This includes it all, Rett's to BAP.

For accuracy, if one has "HFA", it's probably more descriptive to use Autistic Disorder; HFA and LFA are closer to each other than AS and HFA are in appearance (this is if you're in the US with its use of the DSM-IV-TR). Otherwise, many people lump them in together in Europe and Australia (anything over a certain IQ/speech threshold as an adult hits AS).



kip
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09 May 2008, 2:32 am

I usually say I have a more mild form of Autism and explain that the major problem is with social situations. Usually shuts people up.



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09 May 2008, 2:48 am

I don't say either - I just say "my brain works in a different way to most people's" & they don't have any trouble understanding that concept because it is pretty obvious from my behaviour anyway!



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09 May 2008, 6:11 am

i say aspergers sydrome which is a mild form of autism, when i tell people about it, which is very rare.

i was diagnosed with classic autism as a kid then someone else i saw about it diagnosed me with AS.



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09 May 2008, 6:52 am

JasonWilkes wrote:
Technically: yes. When talking to the average person, I'd say: no.

Vernacular speech often differs from the specialized mini-languages that develop in certain subcultures or highly specialized academic fields.

For example: The word "Atheist".
In vernacular, everyday speech, most people interpret the word to refer to a person who believes that there is no god (i.e. a belief, or assertion, of a negative), whereas almost every writer, philosopher, etc. who calls him/her self an "Atheist", actually holds closer to the position that the average person would call "Agnostic" -- (i.e. a lack of belief in a god or gods, but not an assertion of either a negative or positive stance).

So while technically, Asperger's is a form of Autism, saying so to anyone who doesn't already know a lot about AS would probably serve more to misinform than to inform.

:wink:


You are certainly right:

a=without
theist=belief in god

Without belief in god

Unfortunately, many believe that "no belief in god" means "belief of no god".

One thing I ALWAYS hated was:

inflammable! What the HELL does THAT mean!?!? in=not! flammable=able to catch fire! So OBVIOUSLY inflammable doesn't mean able to catch fire because, even if it did, they would STILL say flammable because it is clearer, shorter, etc....

YET, inflammable DOES mean flammable! SO, although I would NEVER say "inflammable"(It is a MORONIC word, it is deceptive and gives you NOTHING that a part of it "flammable" would give you.), I have to recognize what it COULD mean. SOME might use it to mean NON flammable though! :evil:

Likewise, atheist has an understood meaning EVEN if it is TRULY incorrect.



Reodor_Felgen
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09 May 2008, 7:07 am

I prefer the term Asperger's. Allthough many people don't know what this is, they don't associate it with Rain Man.


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