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Snowgoose
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22 Aug 2009, 11:37 am

Hi people,

I'm Snowgoose - real name is Nic.

I'm 42, currently living in the UK and about to return to education and embark on a Degree course at Uni in September.

I have suspected that I'm an Aspie for a good few years now and, looking back on my life so far, it would explain a lot.

Currently I am in a pretty bad place, having recenty taken a totally unsuitable job out of sheer necessity (telesales - if you knew what the jobmarket was like around here you would understand...) and I find myself raw, utterly drained and emotionally beaten up at the end of each day - I need the money for Uni tho' so no real option there.

Hence my current interest in my supposed condition - but I'm still not not sure what to do about it - a referal to psychiatric services around here usually takes in the order of six months by which time I'll be feeling perfectly "normal" again & not seeing any need for help.

I've done a couple of the on-line tests & these seem to point toward Aspergers being the root of my issues (40 points on the aq dot server8 dot org AQ test & an Aspie:NT score of 131:81 on the first run and 132:77 on the second run-thru on the Aspie-Quiz server).

As I said though, I just don't know what to DO about it - even if I get a diagnosis - is it anything more than a rubber-stamp on my condition? what do I tell my employers? do I say anything to my Uni? will my colleagues and friends understand? and if I DON'T get a diagnosis - is there any point saying to a potential employer "I think I might have Asperger's - I did this online test" or should I just keep quiet about it?

I know, I know - this isn't the best introduction but I'm climbing the curtains at the moment, what I've writen here has taken me hours and I'm needing advice too badly to lurk - give me a few weeks and I'll have my feet back on the ground.

:oops:


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outlier
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22 Aug 2009, 12:30 pm

Hello and welcome.

Snowgoose wrote:
Hence my current interest in my supposed condition - but I'm still not not sure what to do about it - a referal to psychiatric services around here usually takes in the order of six months by which time I'll be feeling perfectly "normal" again & not seeing any need for help.


The first person to speak to about diagnosis is your GP. They should refer you to a clinical psychologist who can diagnose adults in your area. Often, there is no one local to provide this expertise. In this case, you might require an out of area referral.

I experienced a 9 month wait for psychiatric services for anxiety. It turned out they knew nothing of AS/autism. That was around the time I'd begun to suspect it in myself.

Instead of going through them concerning my suspected AS, I ended my (harmful) anxiety treatment and went back to my GP to mention the possibility of AS. I knew the mental health team would not listen (they very rarely listened to me about anything). He thought me to be correct and things went from there.

Snowgoose wrote:
As I said though, I just don't know what to DO about it - even if I get a diagnosis - is it anything more than a rubber-stamp on my condition? what do I tell my employers? do I say anything to my Uni? will my colleagues and friends understand? and if I DON'T get a diagnosis - is there any point saying to a potential employer "I think I might have Asperger's - I did this online test" or should I just keep quiet about it?


If you require accommodations at uni and work, a diagnosis will give you easier access to them. It is possible that your future uni may even be able to obtain funding to send you for a diagnosis if the NHS refuses. You can access some of the help available from uni disability services if you just have a note from your GP about suspected AS. However, if you obtain a solid diagnosis (rather than just having it noted as suspected AS in your records), I think your uni will also be able to access the funding needed from your local education authority to provide you with more support; for example, weekly meetings with a support mentor.

I think a diagnosis will also give you a stronger case concerning work-related accommodations or if challenging discrimination.

Let me know if you have any more questions concerning diagnosis and the NHS.



lelia
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22 Aug 2009, 2:44 pm

Becoming aware of your mental wiring will help you find workarounds for what you need to do to live. I agree tho, you do have one of the worst jobs for people like us. Good luck on your future.



Snowgoose
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23 Aug 2009, 6:11 am

Thankyou for the replys,

I think you are both right, I really need to go ahead and try to get a referral, more for "closure" and my own peace of mind than anything else, but if it means that I can get easier access to some kind of support / mentoring at uni when things go bad (which they undoubtably will) then all the better.

My trouble is that the majority of the time I just don't feel the NEED, I feel perfectly happy and "normal" although I'm not certain people around me would agree with that.

Anyway, thanks again and I'm glad I found this site, it has already started answering some long-standing questions and issues for me.

SG.


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visnofskygirl
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24 Aug 2009, 12:20 am

welcome here 8)


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