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gismo
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15 Dec 2008, 1:23 pm

Out of quite a lot of time I've spent at School, there's been this thing where, everybody knows I have AS and Dyspraxia, but nobody really says much about it, for example. one of the people there, was telling me off for something and said:

"Well, you know he has...(Pause)...Special Needs?"

Something happened just this lunchtime that was quite unusual because normally, people don't talk about my AS, and I was halfway through lunch, and halfway down the table!

"IS IT DYSLEXIA THAT YOU HAVE?"

It's just getting on my nerves, I wish people would just accept I have AS and if they want to say it then they say it... What is wrong with saying the 'Word' It's getting to the Harry Potter 'He Who Must Not Be Named' Stage.. :lol:



richardbenson
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15 Dec 2008, 1:31 pm

im trying to remember when i was in school, people generally didnt ask me why i was in special ed classes. the schools back then tryed to intergrate the retards with the normals. the only normal class i had in highschool was science class and homeroom, all the rest of the classes i was in were special ed classes :lol:


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gismo
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15 Dec 2008, 1:39 pm

richardbenson wrote:
im trying to remember when i was in school, people generally didnt ask me why i was in special ed classes. the schools back then tryed to intergrate the retards with the normals. the only normal class i had in highschool was science class and homeroom, all the rest of the classes i was in were special ed classes :lol:


We don't have those, mainly because I'm in a Primary School, but I normally go to normal classes doing normal work, sometimes when I can't be offered help by the TA if she's ill, or is away doing something like photocopying, then normally one of the other adults in class steps in.

Which isn't always a good thing, once, there were no people in class besides the teacher, who was a supply, and I got stuck on something, about the whole class were waiting for help, she kept helping them when I was stuck on something and needed more help then they did, and I got told off at the end of the lesson for not doing any flipping work! :x



pakled
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15 Dec 2008, 2:06 pm

Well, older people have trouble relating to younger people, especially as they get older.

We're in a stage where people are just being made aware of a lot of this. Stereotypes are still out there. It's going to take a while to educate people about our conditions.



gismo
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15 Dec 2008, 2:15 pm

pakled wrote:
Well, older people have trouble relating to younger people, especially as they get older.

We're in a stage where people are just being made aware of a lot of this. Stereotypes are still out there. It's going to take a while to educate people about our conditions.


Yeah, I mean, If my dreams came true, People would be about as nervous of saying:

He's got Aspergers Syndrome
than,
He's got brown hair.

I mean, What is the point?



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15 Dec 2008, 2:21 pm

Worst part is that a lot of people at your age don't want to know about it, unless they have a weird fascination or are the type of person who can't help but want to help everyone. Most people would rather not know anything about it, and not have anything to do with it because it is not "normal," even if it is becoming closer to a norm everyday. When I was in elementary school, people knew I was disabled, but would prefer to look at me as not disabled, and far from normal, simply because they didn't want to have anything to do with people with disablities. I myself find that I understand their not wanting to be associated with the disabled better than most other things about the normal world, simply because I dreaded the idea of being so myself, even though I knew I was. And that created problems for me...

My advice: Tell them you would rather be known by who you are, not the disorders you have. If they can't except that, they are either too young to understand, or don't care enough.



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15 Dec 2008, 2:25 pm

I also got this, but only from people like bullies or people that didn't even know me. Like in ninth grade, I was in the special ed gym class (only because the other gym classes had a ton of bullies and I was too small). One day, I was leaning against the wall, bored as heck, when I saw there was a new girl in one of the other classes. She was talking to another girl and asked "Who's she?", pointing at me. The other girl said, "Oh, she's just one of them", referring to the low-functioning kids. I went over and told them a thing or two. And in twelfth grade, I was doing my GQE with the other kids in the school with random disorders. Those kids were never nice to me once (they were the worst ones to me there while the "NTs" were actually really nice to me). Anyway, one day I heard them saying about me, "What's wrong with her anyway?" in that snotty tone of voice. :roll:



15 Dec 2008, 2:32 pm

Kids thought I was retarded or weird, crazy, strange, stupid, etc.



NocturnalQuilter
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15 Dec 2008, 2:40 pm

OP: Sounds like a lot of whining about not being understood and then complaining over being asked to explain yourself so people better understand you.
I would imagine people in wheelchairs might feel something similar. People still stare and maybe asked really stupid questions.



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15 Dec 2008, 3:09 pm

NocturnalQuilter wrote:
Sounds like a lot of whining about not being understood and then complaining over being asked to explain yourself so people better understand you


He's 10 years old. It's okay for 10 year olds to not understand the adult social realm. I don't get it either most of the time.

Don't worry Gismo. Sometimes adults have 'hang ups' or want to project an image of themselves that is perfect, and these folks don't tolerate difference. And the reality is that nobody is perfect. Let's call it "NT disorder". :P

I think Harry Potter is pretty cool for being different and how he dealt with the rejection is a good lesson.

You sound like a smart young man, and I'd be very proud of you. :D



Callista
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15 Dec 2008, 4:40 pm

You deal with being autistic every day; it's something you're used to. Those kids have never had that experience. You've figured things out OK, but for them, it's something they still haven't learned how to respond to. It's like you've been doing multiplication for years and they're just figuring out what numbers are. They're going to need time. Disabled people still seem unfamiliar and maybe even a little frightening to them. It's no surprise that they get weird about it, especially when it's not obvious to them how you're different, like it would be if you used crutches or something.


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15 Dec 2008, 4:47 pm

If you want a weird story: I once asked an autistic kid what it was like to be autisitc, but at the time I didn't know I was AS or even what AS was. Looking back I'm thinking wow, I just asked a kid what it was like to be me.



15 Dec 2008, 4:54 pm

lol. I've had people asking me what is it like to have AS and I find that such a difficult question to answer. So I have asked them what is it like to not have it and guess what, they couldn't really answer it either. I made a point.

Everyday I wonder what is it like to not have it and wonder what would I be like without it.



886
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15 Dec 2008, 4:57 pm

If I ever brought it up, it was "You have ass burgers?" and followed by "What the hell is that?"


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15 Dec 2008, 4:59 pm

886 wrote:
If I ever brought it up, it was "You have ass burgers?" and followed by "What the hell is that?"


I have that happen a lot too.