Interesting read on "high functioning" Autism.

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TheAvenger161173
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08 Jul 2017, 12:43 pm

A lot of this resonated with me. Interesting read. https://themighty.com/2017/05/problem-a ... ng-labels/



kraftiekortie
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08 Jul 2017, 3:14 pm

This might not be the point: but Aspergers remains in the ICD-10, though it might be taken out in the ICD-11. The ICD-10 is used in the US at times.

The "struggles" of everybody on the Spectrum (and everybody, period) should be "evaluated" on an individual basis. The person who must wear a helmet, and the person suffering from bullying and unemployment, are probably going through a similar "intensity" of struggle, despite differences in "functioning."



TheAvenger161173
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08 Jul 2017, 3:25 pm

kraftiekortie wrote:
This might not be the point: but Aspergers remains in the ICD-10, though it might be taken out in the ICD-11. The ICD-10 is used in the US at times.

The "struggles" of everybody on the Spectrum (and everybody, period) should be "evaluated" on an individual basis. The person who must wear a helmet, and the person suffering from bullying and unemployment, are probably going through a similar "intensity" of struggle, despite differences in "functioning."

Everyone's different. :) It mirrors my own experience a little. I suppose I'm biased towards articles with experiences that lean towards my own.



SaveFerris
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09 Jul 2017, 7:30 am

TheAvenger161173 wrote:
kraftiekortie wrote:
This might not be the point: but Aspergers remains in the ICD-10, though it might be taken out in the ICD-11. The ICD-10 is used in the US at times.

The "struggles" of everybody on the Spectrum (and everybody, period) should be "evaluated" on an individual basis. The person who must wear a helmet, and the person suffering from bullying and unemployment, are probably going through a similar "intensity" of struggle, despite differences in "functioning."

Everyone's different. :) It mirrors my own experience a little. I suppose I'm biased towards articles with experiences that lean towards my own.


Good read. It was interesting to read that the authors catalyst for a 'mask' was the cruel treatment they received. In my experience I don't believe I received cruel treatment so find it difficult to identify when & why I started hiding my true self


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IstominFan
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09 Jul 2017, 9:19 am

I can relate to this article. I was bullied as a teenager and missed a lot of opportunities to make friends because I was different. I regret the false starts and missed opportunities most of all. I have greatly expanded my social opportunities, but wonder if it might not be too late to experience the sort of changes that could ever lead to me getting married or becoming fully independent. I almost lost all the gains I made due to an act of monumental stupidity, but am in the process of getting my life back on track.



TheAvenger161173
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09 Jul 2017, 12:05 pm

SaveFerris wrote:
TheAvenger161173 wrote:
kraftiekortie wrote:
This might not be the point: but Aspergers remains in the ICD-10, though it might be taken out in the ICD-11. The ICD-10 is used in the US at times.

The "struggles" of everybody on the Spectrum (and everybody, period) should be "evaluated" on an individual basis. The person who must wear a helmet, and the person suffering from bullying and unemployment, are probably going through a similar "intensity" of struggle, despite differences in "functioning."

Everyone's different. :) It mirrors my own experience a little. I suppose I'm biased towards articles with experiences that lean towards my own.


Good read. It was interesting to read that the authors catalyst for a 'mask' was the cruel treatment they received. In my experience I don't believe I received cruel treatment so find it difficult to identify when & why I started hiding my true self
I got bullied horrifically as a child. It had a profound effect on my behaviour. After being diagnosed a couple of years ago, I started becoming comfortable being myself for a short period,not making eye contact if I didn't want too,not sensoring myself, and not suppressing myself...till a friend made a derogatory comment about it. I decided I can't be myself in public,or around friends,so went back to blending in and suppressing everything. I can be myself around one person who doesn't judge me. Everyone else says they won't judge you till you decide to be yourself....then they judge you.