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Do you tell people that you have autism?
Poll runs till 28 May 2021, 12:33 am
Yes 29%  29%  [ 5 ]
No 47%  47%  [ 8 ]
Close friends only 24%  24%  [ 4 ]
Total votes : 17

kraftiekortie
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29 Mar 2021, 4:19 pm

Sweden is a place where you could probably do that. It's a relatively more enlightened society than the US.

In the US----especially within realms like retail or fast food (where many people on WP seem to work), to reveal one's autism is to leave one open to insults and to getting fired for no reason.

We have something called "at will" employment, where one could be fired for almost any reason at all if one is not a member of a union. No hearings are required, unlike what occurs in many other countries.

There are laws against discrimination in the US---but the "at will" concept can be used to offset any lawsuit for discrimination. One could be fired for, say, wearing a polo shirt instead of a dress shirt, and nobody would bat an eyelash. If they're fired explicitly for being autistic, though, then there's a problem. Hence, the employer fires you, not for your autism, but for wearing a polo shirt.



Joe90
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29 Mar 2021, 8:54 pm

I am very closeted about my diagnosis and I'm happy that way. Telling people I'm on the autistic spectrum will just cause confusion and misunderstanding, and I will probably be looked at in a different light. Well, I might not be, but I'm just afraid that I might.

I think it stems back to childhood when I first got diagnosed (unlike other females on the spectrum :roll: ). It was all completely out of my control and it felt like everybody had to be told about my diagnosis. So now I am my own person, I now have the choice to tell or not to tell. And I've chosen not to tell. I talk about my Aspie problems on WP, but it only stays on WP. In the offline world, I identify myself as a neurotypical.


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1986
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29 Mar 2021, 10:48 pm

When I was younger I used to share it with friends, but found it contributed to no positive change, so since about 6 years ago I've just kept it to myself. My partner knows, though.

I don't generally care what others think of me -- as long as I'm not actively hated -- so either is fine.


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Yakuzamonroe
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02 Apr 2021, 4:43 pm

I hide it for the most part. And I hate doing it.

It's getting harder as I get older but, if I'm looking for work, I think it's a necessity.



Dial1194
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02 Apr 2021, 6:03 pm

No, but not because I feel like I have to mask or hide it. I simply feel that it's not anyone else's business. I am what I am and people can either accept that or not; they don't get to have a nice neat label/pigeonhole for me that they most likely don't understand in the first place.



PhosphorusDecree
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04 Apr 2021, 11:25 am

I ticked "close friends only," which is the closest but not entirely accurate. I have told my supervisors at work as well, but not any of my colleagues. In this case telling has been very useful- they now know enough to work around some of my problems.


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PhosphorusDecree
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04 Apr 2021, 11:29 am

kraftiekortie wrote:
Sweden is a place where you could probably do that. It's a relatively more enlightened society than the US.

In the US----especially within realms like retail or fast food (where many people on WP seem to work), to reveal one's autism is to leave one open to insults and to getting fired for no reason.

We have something called "at will" employment, where one could be fired for almost any reason at all if one is not a member of a union. No hearings are required, unlike what occurs in many other countries.

There are laws against discrimination in the US---but the "at will" concept can be used to offset any lawsuit for discrimination. One could be fired for, say, wearing a polo shirt instead of a dress shirt, and nobody would bat an eyelash. If they're fired explicitly for being autistic, though, then there's a problem. Hence, the employer fires you, not for your autism, but for wearing a polo shirt.


And yet, no-one wants to join a union... the widespread anti-union sentiment in both our countires is a source of unending delight to bigoted employers.


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JustFoundHere
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04 Apr 2021, 5:09 pm

I had voted 'No' in the poll. This was a tough vote; as I've had to periodically tell providers of health/medical services of the Autism Spectrum (AS) in order to clarify my health insurance coverage; that is coverage I receive on account (AS).

From the perspectives of my objectives, 'to tell or not to tell' is usually not a concern - esp. considering that I'm seeking opportunities to become acquainted with people experienced with AS/NT friendships - In short, very proactive objectives regarding (AS).

I have discussed what might very well be helpful in AS/NT friendships on WP. Yet, it's very disappointing that I have not received no feedback - What are the aversions in typing even brief responses - See latest (LINK) post (as of this writing) in 'The General Autism Discussion' Forum.

LINK: viewtopic.php?f=3&t=102721&start=2512



ArtsyFarsty
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Yesterday, 5:24 pm

Joe90 wrote:
I think it stems back to childhood when I first got diagnosed (unlike other females on the spectrum :roll: ). It was all completely out of my control and it felt like everybody had to be told about my diagnosis. So now I am my own person, I now have the choice to tell or not to tell.

Yes. Something I became very conscious about as my AS son got older and able to self-advocate, was recognizing that he has the right to control his “image” by deciding whether and to whom to disclose his diagnosis. Which I’m really glad I did because by 14 or 15, he started to recognize that people would treat him differently once they found out; even if it was in a benevolent sort of way, it still bothered him when they would start speaking slower or assuming he is less capable. He has chosen to only disclose it to a very small handful of people. I also had to be mindful about teaching my other children that it is his right to disclose it, not theirs, unless he gives permission.

For myself, so far only 3 people know: my husband, my AS son, and a coworker that I am close with. I’m not sure when to tell my other children, but I suppose it will come up at some point. There is really no point in telling my other family members because I am not confident that they will be supportive.