Desperation, Science, Charlatans and Alternative Treatments

Page 5 of 5 [ 74 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5

funeralxempire
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 27 Oct 2014
Age: 36
Gender: Male
Posts: 10,917
Location: I'm on the streets like curbs

18 Sep 2020, 3:49 am

ASPartOfMe wrote:
A Disgraced Ex-Doctor Says He's Behind the Use of Ketamine to 'Cure' a Child with Autism
Quote:
Roby Mitchell hasn’t been allowed to practice medicine for 15 years, but that doesn’t seem to stop him from dispensing medical advice. Mitchell, who lives in Amarillo, Texas, was permanently stripped of his medical license in 2005 for not following a previous probationary order. He was then ordered again in 2012 to stop practicing medicine or holding himself out as a doctor; the Texas Medical Board said he told a cancer patient the disease could be treated by drinking cow’s milk, after Mitchell had injected the patient’s blood into that cow’s udder. (The patient died in hospice before they could drink the "treated" milk.)

Today, going by the moniker "Dr. Fitt," Mitchell is still peddling unproven cures and treatments for everything from the novel coronavirus to autism on social media and his personal website. As the COVID-19 outbreak has worsened, he’s begun touting a variety of fallacious cures for the disease

More disturbingly, though, Mitchell is also touting the success his methods have supposedly had on curing real people of other conditions. That includes children: With the help of a local pain-management doctor in Amarillo, Mitchell says, he has been directing the treatment of a six-year-old who’s been given at least three ketamine IV drips. Mitchell has claimed that ketamine and other speculative methods will "cure" the child of their non-verbal autism.

The child’s name and parents’ names are being withheld by VICE to protect the child’s privacy. The child has undergone at least three ketamine IV treatments, which have been documented in videos and social media posts uploaded by Mitchell, as well as by the child’s mother and grandmother.

The treatment was recommended and directed by Mitchell, according to him, and administered, according to Mitchell and the child's mother, by Dr. BJ Daneshfar, an anesthesiologist and pain management doctor based in Amarillo. Daneshfar didn’t respond to two requests for comment left with someone who identified himself as his office manager, who could never seem to find the doctor in the office when VICE called (which we did prior to the coronavirus pandemic). Daneshfar also did not respond to emails sent to his office and personal email addresses or a text message sent to a cell phone number listed as his in public records.

Reached for comment, Mitchell questioned a VICE reporter’s "level of education," saying, "Looking at your page, you’re not a science writer and don’t appear to have a science background. This topic is not in your wheelhouse." (He didn’t respond to a question about precisely what "page" he meant. His limited response to VICE’s other questions is below.)

In a video uploaded by Mitchell to both Facebook and Instagram in February, the child’s mother was interviewed by him as he stood off-camera. In the video, she said her child was diagnosed with autism at three years old. Daneshfar recommended the treatments to the child’s grandmother, she added. "He brought it up to her, about us trying it out."

"After the first treatment, within a day or two, he started saying more words than we’d ever heard," the mother claimed on the video. "Just talking for himself, really. He’s not just repeating. He’s using words on his own."

As the mother spoke, the video panned to her child, who was slumped in a wheelchair, verbalizing sounds and, repeatedly, what sounds like the word "No."

Mitchell paired the video with a long caption about "curing" autism. "There are several ways to cure autism," he wrote, "once you understand that the cause is inflammation in the amygdala portion of the brain due to Candida overgrowth."

There are a number of things wrong with that statement, starting with Mitchell’s lack of qualifications to make any claim whatsoever about autism or brain health: He wasn’t a neurologist when he was licensed to practice medicine, according to Texas Medical Board records. There’s absolutely no scientific consensus that autism is caused by inflammation or Candida overgrowth (Though he’s not alone in making claims about the purported links between yeast and autism. Candida albicans is an opportunistic pathogenic yeast commonly found in the human digestive tract, and some autism advocates claim that treating yeast overgrowth mitigates autism symptoms, a claim that is, at this point, speculative at best.) There’s also no proof that ketamine would be a way to cure inflammation or candida overgrowth. And there is, according to every reputable medical expert, no known "cure" for autism at all, particularly not an overnight improvement such as Mitchell claims ketamine can provide.


If ketamine cured autism I should have been cured ages ago. :lol:


_________________
politics is dumb but very important
戦争ではなく戦争と戦う


carlos55
Veteran
Veteran

Joined: 5 Mar 2018
Gender: Male
Posts: 623
Location: uk

18 Sep 2020, 4:14 am

Nasty stuff Ketamine, also a party drug, many have lost their bladders to it & spend the rest of their lives having to urinate a bag.



ASPartOfMe
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 25 Aug 2013
Age: 63
Gender: Male
Posts: 24,892
Location: Long Island, New York

07 Dec 2020, 6:35 am

Prominent Anti-Vaccine Pediatrician Dr. Paul Thomas Has License Suspended by the Oregon Medical Board

Quote:
Dr. Paul Thomas, a prominent anti-vaccine pediatrician in Oregon, had his license suspended Dec. 3 on an emergency basis after the state's medical board found evidence he had violated standard medical practices related to vaccines.

The Oregon Medical Board took the unusual step after reviewing evidence that alleged Thomas guided his patients away from getting the standard course of childhood vaccinations—and that patients suffered vaccine-preventable diseases possibly as a result.

"The Board has determined from the evidence available at this time that Licensee's continued practice of medicine would pose an immediate danger to the public and to his patients," the board's order of emergency suspension states. 'Therefore, it is necessary to immediately suspend his license to practice medicine. To do otherwise would subject Licensee's patients to the serious risk of harm while this case remains under investigation."

A mother requested vaccines that Thomas did not have on hand, and he tried to dissuade her from getting her child vaccinated.

Dr. Thomas "asked her how awful she would feel if Patient A [her child] got autism and she could have prevented it," the order states.

But the medical board also reviewed troubling new allegations that Thomas appeared to push parents not to accept vaccines, including the rotavirus vaccine, and that several of his unvaccinated patients were hospitalized after not getting the vaccine.

That included 10-month-old twins who "were suffering from severe dehydration and serum electrolyte abnormalities and required five days of hospitalization (April 25-30, 2019)," according to the medical board order.

Possibly even more alarming was this statement, by the mother of the twins: "Patient G and Patient H's mother stated during hospitalization that she thought her children had received rotavirus vaccine." That raises the question of whether Dr. Thomas was withholding vaccines that parents wanted or assumed their children were getting. (The medical board order does not address that question.)

The board also took issue with his alleged decision to study his patient's immune response to the measles mumps rubella vaccine.

In so doing, he ordered antibody tests of 905 patients, and the order suggests the tests ordered between 2002 and 2015 were unnecessary. But more troubling were the findings he made and apparently did not act on: that 122 of his patients did not have sufficient antibodies, including 90 of the patients who had not had a second vaccine that is part of the standard vaccination schedule.

Thomas also was a doctor of a high-profile patient who contracted tetanus on a farm and spent two months in an intensive care unit, WW reported in 2019. But the medical board order includes a new detail: that he apparently saw the patient for follow-up care. "Licensee's notes documented a referral to a homeopath, recommendation of fish oil supplements, and 'phosphatidyl seine [an apparent supplement],'" the order states.


_________________
Professionally Identified and joined WP August 26, 2013
DSM 5: Autism Spectrum Disorder, DSM IV: Aspergers Moderate Severity.

My autism is not a superpower. It also isn’t some kind of god-forsaken, endless fountain of suffering inflicted on my family. It’s just part of who I am as a person.


rowan_nichol
Veteran
Veteran

Joined: 28 Jul 2016
Age: 57
Gender: Male
Posts: 599
Location: England

10 Dec 2020, 6:43 pm

ASPartOfMe wrote:
Prominent Anti-Vaccine Pediatrician Dr. Paul Thomas Has License Suspended by the Oregon Medical Board
Quote:
Dr. Paul Thomas, a prominent anti-vaccine pediatrician in Oregon, had his license suspended Dec. 3 on an emergency basis after the state's medical board found evidence he had violated standard medical practices related to vaccines.

The Oregon Medical Board took the unusual step after reviewing evidence that alleged Thomas guided his patients away from getting the standard course of childhood vaccinations—and that patients suffered vaccine-preventable diseases possibly as a result.

"The Board has determined from the evidence available at this time that Licensee's continued practice of medicine would pose an immediate danger to the public and to his patients," the board's order of emergency suspension states. 'Therefore, it is necessary to immediately suspend his license to practice medicine. To do otherwise would subject Licensee's patients to the serious risk of harm while this case remains under investigation."

A mother requested vaccines that Thomas did not have on hand, and he tried to dissuade her from getting her child vaccinated.

Dr. Thomas "asked her how awful she would feel if Patient A [her child] got autism and she could have prevented it," the order states.

But the medical board also reviewed troubling new allegations that Thomas appeared to push parents not to accept vaccines, including the rotavirus vaccine, and that several of his unvaccinated patients were hospitalized after not getting the vaccine.

That included 10-month-old twins who "were suffering from severe dehydration and serum electrolyte abnormalities and required five days of hospitalization (April 25-30, 2019)," according to the medical board order.

Possibly even more alarming was this statement, by the mother of the twins: "Patient G and Patient H's mother stated during hospitalization that she thought her children had received rotavirus vaccine." That raises the question of whether Dr. Thomas was withholding vaccines that parents wanted or assumed their children were getting. (The medical board order does not address that question.)

The board also took issue with his alleged decision to study his patient's immune response to the measles mumps rubella vaccine.

In so doing, he ordered antibody tests of 905 patients, and the order suggests the tests ordered between 2002 and 2015 were unnecessary. But more troubling were the findings he made and apparently did not act on: that 122 of his patients did not have sufficient antibodies, including 90 of the patients who had not had a second vaccine that is part of the standard vaccination schedule.

Thomas also was a doctor of a high-profile patient who contracted tetanus on a farm and spent two months in an intensive care unit, WW reported in 2019. But the medical board order includes a new detail: that he apparently saw the patient for follow-up care. "Licensee's notes documented a referral to a homeopath, recommendation of fish oil supplements, and 'phosphatidyl seine [an apparent supplement],'" the order states.

recommendation of fish oil supplements, - one would not be surprised to have seen Snake Oil in that sentence



ASPartOfMe
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 25 Aug 2013
Age: 63
Gender: Male
Posts: 24,892
Location: Long Island, New York

18 Apr 2021, 8:37 am

False hope: desperate families prey to ‘nonsense’ snake-oil treatments for autism

Quote:
Bleach enemas, restrictive diets, and potentially toxic pills are among the dangerous and debunked “therapies” that parents of children with autism have been sold.

The bleach – “Miracle Mineral Supplement” – was sold on an entirely baseless claim that intestinal parasites cause autism. Last year, the Therapeutic Goods Administration banned the advertising and sale of MMS after its makers also started claiming it was a cure for coronavirus.

MMS may be gone, but there are still dozens of useless therapies being peddled. Some, such as chelation, are potentially deadly pills, injections or suppositories. Others, including strict diets and homeopathic or chiropractic treatments, are just a waste of time.

Advocates say a “shadow industry” has grown in the gulf between autism diagnosis and treatment – an industry that is selling false hope to desperate parents.

Andrew Whitehouse, professor of autism at the Telethon Kids Institute and the research strategy director at the Autism Co-operative Research Centre, says the autism sector should “absolutely expect and only accept the same standards that we accept for other areas of health and medicine”.

“And at the moment we don’t do that,” he says. “The autism sector has had an acceptance of a shadow industry for many years with very poor evidence or no evidence whatsoever.

There are things like hyperbaric oxygen therapies, dietary therapies like camel milk, gluten-free diets … special milkshakes. All of this stuff is nonsense.”

Whitehouse does not blame parents, but a regulatory system that allows non-evidence-based therapies to be offered not just privately, but through the public system – while not offering the support that parents actually need.

“For public money, there’s no debate. It cannot and should not be spent on interventions with no evidence. Families need to be protected at a very vulnerable time in their lives.”

The National Disability Insurance Agency commissioned the Autism CRC to review the evidence for 111 interventions for children aged up to 12 years. It found, for example, moderate evidence for early intensive behavioural intervention. If done properly, speech, psychological and occupational therapy can help, as can social skills training.

But there’s hardly any evidence for auditory integration therapy, and only low-quality evidence for music therapy.

Whitehouse has been reporting on his study to the Senate’s select committee on autism. The inquiry was set up by Liberal senator Hollie Hughes, whose son was diagnosed with autism a decade ago. She says parents “are desperate” to make sure their children get the best help possible, but that children who need a lot of help might need up to 40 hours a week, and that’s expensive.

That means there’s a market for other sorts of therapies.

“Swimming with dolphins might be very nice but it won’t help with autism,” she says.

“Equine therapy might be nice … but it won’t teach children how to use speech and communicate.”

Hughes says there can be long delays in diagnosis, because many doctors don’t recognise autistic traits. Sometimes GPs will blame deafness for a lack of speech or non-responsiveness. Once there is a referral to a specialist, there can be more delays – particularly if money or access is a barrier.

Autism is not like other conditions. It’s complicated.

Autism Awareness Australia chief executive Nicole Rogerson agrees that the delays in the system lead to parents seeking other answers. “And”, she says, “you get the paediatric wait-and-see … they’ll tell you to come back in six months.” She says even though people with autism make up the biggest cohort in the national disability insurance scheme (about 30 per cent), the overall system gets bogged down between state and federal government.

“In that space where people are waiting for a diagnosis, or they get a diagnosis then there’s a massive waiting list for intervention, it’s in that place where parents are most vulnerable to snake-oil salesmen,” Rogerson says.

“They flourish. They flourish in the NDIS system as well.”

Many parents (mostly mothers, and mostly anonymous) have written in with very different stories about their children’s challenges and abilities, but with very similar stories about frustrations with the system.

Those with autism (again, mostly anonymous) sometimes rail against the system, but more often rail against the stigma. They talk about their isolation, about being abused, bullied, misunderstood. They talk about a world that won’t flex to let them in.

One 11-year-old writes that he really loves “science, Pokemon, otters (and other wild animals), Lego, and Harry Potter”.

“I am a Cub Scout and I like volunteering for community and environmental causes,’’ he says. “I want to go to university (to) be a biologist, zookeeper, ranger, or vet when I grow up.

“I get bullied a lot at school because I am autistic. I have been hit, threatened, sworn at, and excluded from playing because I am different. Someone even stole my hat and put it in the toilet and put poo on it. I don’t get invited to parties that the rest of the class get invited to because ‘I act weird’.”

There are adults who write about the struggle to get work because people just don’t “get” them, or won’t do simple things such as understand and accommodate sensory differences.

Then there are those who would prefer to be called “autistic people”, instead of “people with autism”. The language, like the therapies, are contested.

Others focus on autistic abilities, instead of challenges. There’s Rhett Ellis, an “autistic entrepreneur” from Brisbane who says Australia could emulate Israel and build a “an Australian cybersecurity autistic military base”.

And the charismatic Clay Lewis, 19.

“I love my girlfriend and hanging out with my mates,’’ he says. “I love playing simulated car-racing games and I can tell you everything you need to know about supercars and Formula One.

“I have my own bin-cleaning business and I’ve been trading now for four years, which is pretty amazing. The NDIS has bad funding and a lack of vision, which could see my business closing down. It won’t happen, but, still, it really upsets me.

“I want to have my own business, as it suits my autistic needs. I can be very funny and cheeky to my customers. I tell a lot of jokes– I just give everyone a laugh – and the community loves me. That’s all I’ve got

Whitehouse says the nub of the matter is that because autism is such a diverse experience, it makes each stage of diagnosis, therapy, and lifelong support more complicated, and the way to address those delays is through making sure the system is bolstered every step of the way.

“What we’re looking at is the range of human experience so our job as clinicians, policymakers, and members of the community is to draw out the beauty of the autism experience and to maximise the potential of individuals across the lifespan,” he says.

“Autism is as diverse as humanity itself.”


Very good article.


_________________
Professionally Identified and joined WP August 26, 2013
DSM 5: Autism Spectrum Disorder, DSM IV: Aspergers Moderate Severity.

My autism is not a superpower. It also isn’t some kind of god-forsaken, endless fountain of suffering inflicted on my family. It’s just part of who I am as a person.


longshot
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 4 Dec 2018
Gender: Male
Posts: 3,884
Location: In some fictional location

20 Apr 2021, 7:12 pm

Well, in this day and age as well; several years back, there's always been people whom not only were looking for the magical cure regardless of what form it takes, even if such is literally dangerous and fatal. I've read about a numerous number of quacks hocking all sorts of concoctions to cure autism; including, having an exorcism. Yes, you read that correctly, for there are some whom believe autism as a whole is the work of the Devil.


_________________
Just dealing with hurdles and stumbling blocks


Jiheisho
Veteran
Veteran

Joined: 21 Jul 2020
Age: 57
Gender: Male
Posts: 1,322

25 Apr 2021, 1:38 pm

Florida family indicted for selling toxic bleach as fake Covid (and Autism) ‘cure’

Quote:
A federal grand jury in Miami has indicted a Florida man and his three sons for fraudulently marketing and selling a toxic industrial bleach as a supposed cure for Covid-19, cancer, Alzheimer’s, diabetes, autism, malaria, hepatitis, Parkinson’s, herpes, HIV/Aids, and a range of other medical disorders.

According to the indictment, Mark Grenon, 62, and his sons Jonathan Grenon, 34, Jordan Grenon, 26, and Joseph Grenon, 32, all of Bradenton, “manufactured, promoted, and sold the chemical solution that ingested orally became chlorine dioxide, a powerful bleach typically used for industrial water treatment or bleaching textiles, pulp, and paper.”.

The indictment says the Grenons sold tens of thousands of bottles of “Miracle Mineral Solution” (MMS) nationwide, claiming it could treat, prevent and cure Covid-19. The indictment alleges that the Grenons received more than $1m.

The US Food and Drug Administration has not approved MMS for treatment of Covid-19 or any other use and has warned that drinking the solution is the same as drinking bleach and could cause dangerous side effects. “including severe vomiting, diarrhea and life-threatening low blood pressure”.

According to Guardian reporting, in April last year Mark Grenon wrote to then president Donald Trump to promote industrial bleach as “a wonderful detox that can kill 99% of the pathogens in the body”.

At a subsequent White House briefing, and to the visible astonishment of experts, Trump said disinfectant “knocks [the coronavirus] out in a minute. One minute!”

He went on to ask: “Is there a way we can do something, by an injection inside or almost a cleaning? Because you see it gets in the lungs and it does a tremendous number on the lungs, so it’d be interesting to check that.”

Trump walked back the idea amid widespread alarm and as Reckitt Benckiser, the maker of disinfectants Lysol and Dettol, warned: “Under no circumstance should our disinfectant products be administered into the human body.”

Trump claimed to have been “asking a question sarcastically to reporters like you, just to see what would happen”.

The Grenons are alleged to have sold their bleach solution under the guise of Genesis II Church of Health and Healing, a pseudo-charitable business they are accused of creating to side-step regulation and prosecution.

The business’s own websites describe it as a “non-religious church”. Mark Grenon has acknowledged that Genesis “has nothing to do with religion” and has said he set up the organisation to “legalise the use of MMS” and avoid “going to jail”.

The government has also charged the Grenons with criminal contempt, for allegedly violating civil court orders to stop distribution of MMS, and for allegedly threatening a presiding judge and warning that if the government tried to prevent distribution they would “pick up guns” and instigate “a Waco”.

That was a reference to an event in 1993 in which more than 70 people died during a raid by federal and state authorities on a cult in Texas.

According to the indictment, a search by federal authorities at the Bradenton home of Jonathan Grenon seized dozens of drums containing nearly 10,000lb of sodium chlorite powder, thousands of bottles of MMS and loaded firearms including a pump-action shotgun concealed in a custom-made violin case.

If convicted on charges of conspiracy and criminal contempt, the Grenons could face life imprisonment.

Mark and Joseph Grenon are presently in Colombia, the government said. Jonathan and Jordan Grenon are in US custody. They were due to be arraigned on Monday.



funeralxempire
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 27 Oct 2014
Age: 36
Gender: Male
Posts: 10,917
Location: I'm on the streets like curbs

25 Apr 2021, 2:11 pm

At least ketamine is fun. What benefits does bleach provide? :lol:


_________________
politics is dumb but very important
戦争ではなく戦争と戦う


Fnord
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 6 May 2008
Age: 64
Gender: Male
Posts: 48,280
Location: Stendec

25 Apr 2021, 7:05 pm

funeralxempire wrote:
At least ketamine is fun. What benefits does bleach provide?
A clean-smelling corpse.


_________________
 Link to Official List of Trump's Attrocities 

45OFFICE = TRE45ON
Lock Him Up!


Rexi
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 3 Sep 2017
Age: 30
Gender: Female
Posts: 1,147
Location: Transylvania, Pyromania

27 Apr 2021, 3:53 am

ASPartOfMe wrote:
Homeopathic treatment claims to ‘cure’ autism in NZ
Quote:
A homeopathic treatment regime invented to ‘cure’ autism is in use in New Zealand.

Complete Elimination of Autistic Spectrum Expression, or CEASE therapy as it is known, has drawn international condemnation and the United Kingdom advertising watchdog is now cracking down on false claims made by hundreds of homeopaths offering the treatment.

Eighteen New Zealand homeopaths are listed online as CEASE practitioners. Training entails a three to five-day course.

The concept behind CEASE therapy is autism is caused by toxins. The inventor, the now-deceased Tinus Smits, claimed 70 percent of toxins come from vaccines.

His treatment regime aims to clear the toxins using very dilute amounts of the same toxins. This includes dilute versions of vaccines.

There’s no robust peer-reviewed scientific evidence CEASE therapy - or homeopathy - works any better than a placebo.

Homeopathy works on a concept of 'like-cures-like'. - if something makes you sick, homeopaths will treat you with the same thing, except dilute it.

The logic gets mind-bending. Homeopaths believe the more dilute something is, the more therapeutically potent it is. For example, homeopaths believe a treatment with five drops of active ingredient in 100 mil of water would be weaker than a treatment with only one drop of active ingredient.

A common homeopathic dilution of ingredient with water is 30C. A 30C solution contains less than one part per million million million million million million million million million million of the original ingredient.

The treatment is shaken vigorously between dilutions. Homeopaths believe this activates treatment by releasing a spirit-like healing force. Another theory is water retains a memory of what has been in it.

In New Zealand you can’t just pick up a vial of MMR vaccine from the chemist to water down and sell as a homeopathic treatment.

Vaccines are prescription medicines. The Ministry of Health told Newsroom vaccines fall under section 43 of the Medicines Act. The purchase, possession and rights to administer vaccines lie with health professionals, or people with what’s found as a “reasonable excuse”.

A spokesperson said: “A person purchasing/procuring a vaccine in order to manufacture another therapeutic product from it (such as a homoeopathic vaccine) is unlikely to have a reasonable excuse under s43 unless that person is one of the authorised health care professionals.”

Many New Zealand CEASE practitioners do not have websites listed, and those that do mention it in passing. Auckland-based The Healing Haven’s Lee-Ann McCall offers CEASE therapy and has a page devoted to it. The website page does not claim to cure autism, but it does mention the treatment was initially designed to treat people on the autism spectrum and could be useful for others “as we all suffer from toxicity”.

Prior to Newsroom contacting McCall about the service, the webpage said she has treated vaccinated children who have allergies:

“Several cases are allergy cases including hayfever, asthma, and food allergies in children who have been previously vaccinated. Although they are only just beginning their journey with this method, having only had a few doses of the homeopathic remedy made from the vaccine they are already noticing some lessening in their sensitivity to allergens.”

McCall told Newsroom she was too busy with clients to provide comment for the article and said Newsroom did not have permission to use her name. The following day, mention of treating children with vaccines had been removed from the website, but the page offering CEASE therapy remained.

Three complaints to the Advertising Standards Authority have been made by members of the public regarding various claims made on The Healing Haven’s website over the past four years. The complaints were all settled or upheld, with the website or digital advertising being changed as a result.

Newsroom also contacted the New Zealand Council of Homeopaths with questions and is waiting for a response. Currently the council is promoting an event on its website: Remedy Autism: Meeting the Challenge of Autistic Spectrum Disorder.

A possible scenario is vaccine treatment was purchased from a New Zealand wholesaler importing already diluted products from the United Kingdom. The wholesaler, who lists “remedies” including MMR, meningitis and polio vaccine said the company further dilutes the products it buys and sells them to homeopaths.

Homeopathic products where the active ingredient is not more than 20 parts per million don’t normally need ministerial consent as long as the label and advertising material does not contain therapeutic claims.

University of Auckland’s Helen Petousis Harris thinks for CEASE therapy, the dilution level used would mean it would be unlikely to have any of the original molecules in it.

“They would only need one vial to last them for probably 100 billion doses.”

As well as treating what Smits calls the toxins from vaccines, homeopathy offers its own version of vaccines which proponents suggest protect people, or animals from disease.

Petousis Harris looked into homeopathic prophylaxis - the use of homeopathic vaccines - during a measles outbreak in 2016 when people presented certificates of homeopathic prophylaxis as evidence of immunity.

While the dilute treatments, supposedly containing what homeopaths call disease “nosodes”, are likely harmless water, people’s belief they are protected against disease is worrying.

“That’s the real danger. Forgoing proven treatments for potentially dangerous diseases.”

A randomised blinded placebo-controlled trial showed homeopathic vaccines work as well as the placebos of sugar pills and saline injections. People given them failed to develop an antibody response.

She said she sees CEASE therapy as a whole new level of homeopathic "woo".

“They’re predatory, they’re making money out of this. While it might not cause chemical harm to somebody, it’s pretty low, despicable behaviour really.”

Autism NZ chief executive Dane Dougan said it had been definitively proven vaccines do not cause autism.

He knows of CEASE therapy but had not heard of it being used much in New Zealand, which he thinks is probably a good thing.

“As an organisation our comment on all of these [unproven therapies] is we don’t look for a cause and don’t look for a cure. To be frank it’s quite offensive to be doing it.”

He said the organisation’s focus is helping individuals and families to live with autism. Scientific evidence is looked at to see what’s best to “help those people live the best life they can live”. He gave the example of medication for epilepsy to help control seizures.

He said some of the unproven therapies prey on some of the most vulnerable people in society.

“They should be evidence-based and proven science. Not just people coming up with an idea.”


At some point when I was little, this homeopathic idea was floating around, that some scientist discovered that the same illness cannot be in the body twice, and they quoted this as they were selling dilluted germs and things.

They had no idea that if you get infected while you're ill, it just adds, it doesn't cancel. Otherwise two ill people in proximity would cure each other. They should have made the ill kiss, that'd be fun, but dangerous due to different strands of the illness adding to their infections.

Time to kiss a rabid dog. ௹㋡ I think I'll slip it into my purse just in case.


_________________
Sekky
Atheist
:cat: :cat: