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Where do you stand on the issue?
pro-cure, I'm on the spectrum 14%  14%  [ 9 ]
anti-cure, I'm on the spectrum 61%  61%  [ 39 ]
pro-cure, I'm an NT parent of an ASD child 2%  2%  [ 1 ]
anti-cure, I'm a NT parent of an ASD child 0%  0%  [ 0 ]
other 23%  23%  [ 15 ]
Total votes : 64

vermontsavant
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16 Nov 2011, 6:16 pm

aghogday wrote:
vermontsavant wrote:
aghogday wrote:
vermontsavant wrote:
im not sure who plays the piano either,but i bet im the best


I played it for over 30 years. Playing musical instruments is a great way to get into touch with one's emotions, and in addition to increase the ability to put emotion into communication, moving away from the little professor that is dominant in some.

There are studies that provide evidence that it is like therapy for some autistics.

I can remember not having the motivation to talk, and playing the piano all night long, waking up the next day with the ability to talk and socialize that I couldn't find in the previous day. I thought there was somekind of connection there with emotion and logic that was strenghened by the musical activity. I doubt I would have ever got married, if it wasn't for that skill.
i actualy run in high circles in the world of classical music.im not famous but in friends with big names in the world of mostlly composition.a close friend of mine is going to have his works played by the san francisco symphony orchestra.its rare i get to look smarter than you a gedrene so i might as well milk it for all i can get.once in a great while the savant with no absract thought capacity gets to win.it is very tricky to say if the barriers experienced by autistics is more disability or prejudice.i would say it depends on who you are.i would say my self 60% disabilitu and 40% prejudice


There are all kind of intelligences, and abilities, no one holds them all. I made straight A's in schools, but my dreams were mostly playing team sports, which were well beyond my reach. The fact of the matter is I didn't have the type of intelligence to do the team sports, but I was good at answering questions on a test.

I am impressed with your understanding of musical composition, I could never get it; learning where to put my fingers on the keyboard in relationship with the sheet music was about as deep as I got into it. Eventually I could create music, but only to my likening and a few others, nothing outstanding. And I never translated it into actual composition.

I've had bosses that were horrible at grammar and spelling, but talked in hours of perfect paragraphs. We all have our stronger and weaker points. Having an outstanding skill sets one apart from others though.
true.i would say you,gedrene and i are close in inteligence but were all different.gedrene is the best abstract thinker and from the way you write im not suprised you were good in acedemics.did you go to college.


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16 Nov 2011, 6:51 pm

vermontsavant wrote:
aghogday wrote:
vermontsavant wrote:
aghogday wrote:
vermontsavant wrote:
im not sure who plays the piano either,but i bet im the best


I played it for over 30 years. Playing musical instruments is a great way to get into touch with one's emotions, and in addition to increase the ability to put emotion into communication, moving away from the little professor that is dominant in some.

There are studies that provide evidence that it is like therapy for some autistics.

I can remember not having the motivation to talk, and playing the piano all night long, waking up the next day with the ability to talk and socialize that I couldn't find in the previous day. I thought there was somekind of connection there with emotion and logic that was strenghened by the musical activity. I doubt I would have ever got married, if it wasn't for that skill.
i actualy run in high circles in the world of classical music.im not famous but in friends with big names in the world of mostlly composition.a close friend of mine is going to have his works played by the san francisco symphony orchestra.its rare i get to look smarter than you a gedrene so i might as well milk it for all i can get.once in a great while the savant with no absract thought capacity gets to win.it is very tricky to say if the barriers experienced by autistics is more disability or prejudice.i would say it depends on who you are.i would say my self 60% disabilitu and 40% prejudice


There are all kind of intelligences, and abilities, no one holds them all. I made straight A's in schools, but my dreams were mostly playing team sports, which were well beyond my reach. The fact of the matter is I didn't have the type of intelligence to do the team sports, but I was good at answering questions on a test.

I am impressed with your understanding of musical composition, I could never get it; learning where to put my fingers on the keyboard in relationship with the sheet music was about as deep as I got into it. Eventually I could create music, but only to my likening and a few others, nothing outstanding. And I never translated it into actual composition.

I've had bosses that were horrible at grammar and spelling, but talked in hours of perfect paragraphs. We all have our stronger and weaker points. Having an outstanding skill sets one apart from others though.
true.i would say you,gedrene and i are close in inteligence but were all different.gedrene is the best abstract thinker and from the way you write im not suprised you were good in acedemics.did you go to college.


Yes, no problems there, received three bachelors degrees, and some graduate work. The education wasn't really related to the job I entered into out of college, except that I had some knowledge of computers that was needed in the job from a couple of courses in college. I learned more from my low level employment that was benefical to me IRL, than any knowledge I gained in college.

I had a hard time with communication, but I learned to mimmick others well enough, where eventually no one noticed how much I struggled with it. My handwriting was so illegible, that I avoided writing when possible. I'm not sure if I would have ever gained any writing skills if it wasn't for the development of computers.



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17 Nov 2011, 5:44 am

Just an update, Megz the OP got her Degree, married, raised a family and is now a grandmother.

I say off and on. Sometimes a behavior is just fine, other times the same a disability. As a mechanic, in that world, I am judged by function. The same in an office, by status, and who you know. An office worker in my shop, does not behave the same. When I am in an office to fix the computer, different again. I am not a shape shifter.

There is a lot of just seeing what you can get away with in these NT apes.

In person or by phone, problems, the same by email, excellence.

A lot of my disability has been cured by saying, "Lets step out in the alley and settle this." It has been known to cure my disability in a whole town.

Considering we are much less than 1%, and 10% of them are in jail, on parole, probation, ours is not the big problem in life.

NT stands for social insecurity that has to be propped up all the time.

Living the truth is hard in this world, but living a lie is much worse.

Lying is a cultural thing, I learned we are supposed to accept it. Just looking at people like they are lying to your face is rude. The proper response is act like you believe them, then tell them a lie.

All truth is upsetting, for there is no place for spin. It is called putting someone on the spot. It is considered very rude to hang someone out a third story window and speak of gravity. It does work better than waterboarding to get to the truth, but is still considered rude.

I had a girlfriend once that said, I don't know how to tell you this, I said, just tell the truth. She said, Which One? In her mind, one situation had about ten truths. It did, for she was somewhere she had no buiness I knew of, with someone I did not know, which showed up on the police report about what happened to my car.

They go through life trying to not get caught. After a while they forget who knows what, and they just play the game. I have had a lot of fun just mentioning, that thing that happened recently, while knowing nothing, and learning a lot.

Only Kelly Bundy told the truth, and that once to her little brother Bud.
"We are all liers, and you are all idiots."

Bud understood, lied over the top and got a girlfriend. He lied about who he was, she lied about who she was, Bud got laid.

Truth, morallity, ethics, aside, Bud got laid.

In general, we are not even in the game, like the younger Bud, and no amount of talking about the mathematics of gravity, is going to get a girl to lay down.

You have to work the crowd, they do not know reality, I think we are better there, but they are very fond of illusions.

What they hate worst of all is someone who will not play with them. You have to have an opening line, something they can play to.

I hit me while reading about a serial killer. Somehow he got twenty young women to get in his car and go for a ride in the country. No gun, no duct tape, he just talked to them about them, and they took their last ride. Here was someone showing a real interest in them, wanting to hear their lies. The price was a bit higher than they expected to pay, but they went freely. From the evidence, they consented to sex, no marks or wounds, signs of a struggle, but were unable to consent to what came next as they were being strangled with their own under garments.

Psychopaths do this well, they say it is not them, they just give people what they want. Focused attention, and mostly being played the fool, their money stolen, and few psychopaths hurt anyone. They are not sadists, like sex as much as any, but see what they do as another form of prostitution, telling people what they want to hear, listening and agreeing with their lies. They deserve the money and jewelry for thier labor.

Some say they are a Haliquin Romance, she meets a hot man, he shows very strong interest in everything about her, is intense on many levels, beds her for some record sex, and on the way home to husband and children, she stops at a church and prays for forgivness, and going to drop a coin in the poor box, notices her purse is missing.

There are a lot of versions, most do not involve dead bodies or theft, only deceit, only granting someone an illusion.



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17 Nov 2011, 10:09 am

nostromo wrote:
Gedrene wrote:
aghogday wrote:
People notice these traits in others, it's only when the degree of the clinical features and/or criteria becomes impairing to a person in an important area of life, where together they are considered to constitute a disorder and a person recieves a diagnosis.

I am sorry but you are failing to envision the fact that many aren't in disabling and miserable conditions just because they are disabled in some meaningful way but because the rest of humanity for the most part rejects them, fails to make anything of them, sticks labels on them and pidgeonholes them. Not long ago people like may have been give a lobotomy. It aint rain and sunshine now aghogday.

Of course your not wrong, but then you must admit some people ARE disabled in a meaningful way.
Indeed, and that isn't for the reason that they are like me. Autism spectrum is a false continuum. It is a set of issues connected by vague evaluation and comorbidity.



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17 Nov 2011, 10:11 am

aghogday wrote:
I provided statistics before that 80% of identified diagnosed adults with ASD's depend on their parents for support and 90 percent don't maintain regular employment, that doesn't sound like sunshine to me. There are sociological factors at play and biological factors for individuals that have disabilities, I've never suggested that this is a black and white issue.

*facepalms* Why are you talking about sunshine like I ever said such a thing?
Also:
Gedrene wrote:
I am sorry but you are failing to envision the fact that many aren't in disabling and miserable conditions just because they are disabled in some meaningful way but because the rest of humanity for the most part rejects them, fails to make anything of them, sticks labels on them and pidgeonholes them. Not long ago people like may have been give a lobotomy. It aint rain and sunshine now aghogday.


aghogday wrote:
I wasn't speaking to any moral issues of what is right and wrong, only what is considered the acceptable norms within culture. People within cultures decide what is right or wrong for them on a moral basis.

aghogday wrote:
Circumstances and Culture do affect how people see right or wrong, but circumstances and culture do not necessarily dictate what an individual's personal morals or belief in right or wrong might be.

*facepalms again*
Gedrene wrote:
Despite the megalomanic attempts of human societies in general the fact is that social norms cannot decide what is and what is not consistent anti-social behaviour, despite its attempts to mandate as such.
If cultural norms change what it acceptable despite what reason would dictate then they only pervert the course of things. The only thing that dictates right and wrong are circumstances, not culture. Culture doesn't say what is right or wrong, it just mandates what will be accepted and what not to a degree.


Argumentum ad infinitum.



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17 Nov 2011, 9:43 pm

Gedrene wrote:
aghogday wrote:
I provided statistics before that 80% of identified diagnosed adults with ASD's depend on their parents for support and 90 percent don't maintain regular employment, that doesn't sound like sunshine to me. There are sociological factors at play and biological factors for individuals that have disabilities, I've never suggested that this is a black and white issue.

*facepalms* [/b]Why are you talking about sunshine like I ever said such a thing?
Also:
[/b]Gedrene[b] wrote:
I am sorry but you are failing to envision the fact that many aren't in disabling and miserable conditions just because they are disabled in some meaningful way but because the rest of humanity for the most part rejects them, fails to make anything of them, sticks labels on them and pidgeonholes them. Not long ago people like may have been give a lobotomy. [b]It aint rain and sunshine now aghogday.


aghogday wrote:
I wasn't speaking to any moral issues of what is right and wrong, only what is considered the acceptable norms within culture. People within cultures decide what is right or wrong for them on a moral basis.

aghogday wrote:
Circumstances and Culture do affect how people see right or wrong, but circumstances and culture do not necessarily dictate what an individual's personal morals or belief in right or wrong might be.

*facepalms again*
Gedrene wrote:
Despite the megalomanic attempts of human societies in general the fact is that social norms cannot decide what is and what is not consistent anti-social behaviour, despite its attempts to mandate as such.
If cultural norms change what it acceptable despite what reason would dictate then they only pervert the course of things. The only thing that dictates right and wrong are circumstances, not culture. Culture doesn't say what is right or wrong, it just mandates what will be accepted and what not to a degree.,


Argumentum ad infinitum.


You said "it ain't rain and sunshine now", after you statement, "you are failing to envision the fact many aren't in disabling and miserable conditions just because they are disabled in some meaningful way but because the rest of humanity for the most part rejects them, fails to make anything of them, sticks labels on them and pidgeonholes them. Not long ago people like may have been give a lobotomy."

I was simply responding that I wasn't suggesting that society had nothing to do with the fact that some people with autism have problems in life. Obviously, if only 10 percent are finding regular employment and 20 percent are finding independence in life, society is not providing the necessary accommodations for survival.

"Sunshine" is a metaphor for something good that I used to suggest the unemployment and lack of independence from living in a society that does not fully accommodate autistic people doesn't sound like "sunshine" to me.

If you like you can explain what you meant by "It ain't rain and sunshine now", I would tell you what I think you meant by it, but since it seems like you don't like people to interpret what you say, I'll let you speak for yourself, if you want to explain what you meant by it.

You said "the only thing that dictates right or wrong is circumstances, not culture". While I agree circumstances play a part, Culture does definitely impact people's morals and the way they see right and wrong, through commercialization, religion, music, TV, Books, magazines, newspapers, traditions, sports, education, the list could fill pages.

Everything about a person that grows up in a culture, is impacted by that experience, and morals and what one believes is right and wrong is significantly impacted by a myriad of cultural factors. Just the factor of religion, in culture, plays a huge role in what an individual considers as right or wrong, and the morals they hold.

While an individual may have the personal ability to determine what is right or wrong, and morally correct for themselves, some do not question what is dictated to them through the cultural factor of religion.



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18 Nov 2011, 5:39 am

aghogday wrote:
You said "the only thing that dictates right or wrong is circumstances, not culture". While I agree circumstances play a part, Culture does definitely impact people's morals and the way they see right and wrong, through commercialization, religion, music, TV, Books, magazines, newspapers, traditions, sports, education, the list could fill pages
And you seem to still believe a common delusion that culture somehow determines right and wrong. No, it only determines what people thinking is right and wrong, whether it is right or wrong is not for people to decide and stick labels on.

aghogday wrote:
It's why it takes a jury of 12 to decide a judgement along with a judge in the legal system and an interview process to eliminate those with personal moral bias.
No, the reason why a jury is used is to provide a judgement based on what normal people would think, and to avoid the perversion of the law by corrupt government. In reality personal moral bias can affect the judgement. You don't have to find weird morals infecting the jury and making them cause execrable decisions in courts in the south USA.

aghogday wrote:
In fact, it has been suggested that some people may be born with the inability to determine right from wrong, because of structural issues in the brain, 1 to 3 percent of the population, that are technically referred to as sociopaths. In these cases circumstances and culture have little bearing on what they see as right or wrong
Untrue. Psychopaths have a link between the centres that deal with processing the pain of others and the pleasure centre. They have also been shown to have a very high level of empathy. They know what they are doing wrong, and it gratifies them. SO to say they have no understanding is false.

aghogday wrote:
I provided statistics before that 80% of identified diagnosed adults with ASD's depend on their parents for support and 90 percent don't maintain regular employment, that doesn't sound like sunshine to me
You also came to the insane assertion that over 1 in 300 children in the USA can't talk, and those are only the ones who are autistic. Your statistics about who can speak and who canh't come from eight year olds only. It is also produced by a statistics creator that is now linked with autism speaks. You seem to then be able to quote dates in a lovely little line showing how this group wasn't related, but we have no outside clarification and the way you run with it seems suspect.



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18 Nov 2011, 5:43 am

aghogday wrote:
There are all kind of intelligences, and abilities, no one holds them all. I made straight A's in schools, but my dreams were mostly playing team sports, which were well beyond my reach. The fact of the matter is I didn't have the type of intelligence to do the team sports, but I was good at answering questions on a test.
You don't need a whole different intelligence to know how to do team sports. You need to be physically fit and know who's going where and what to do next.



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18 Nov 2011, 6:55 am

The same stats came up on Work and finding a job. Being Dxed, you get disability payments, so hardly any work. The same, and holding a job, is proof of lack of disability.

It was also brought up that WP has a lot of employed, compared to the stats on disability. aghogday, vermontsavant, pass my autism test, both are or were employed. I was because I was pre disability.

Since 1994, a Dx comes with disability money. So we are talking of different times, and those who found a use for their mental ability, such as IT.

90% of those collecting disability money are not working is closer to the truth, but a look at WP, many working are autistic. It is all about finding a place in life.

So who has the most problem? Those with a Dx, know what the deal is, and have an income, or those who are in school, working, who have problems? WP is popular because it informs the edge, those who may have never been considered autistic, like most girls until very recently, or guys who just did what everyone did, but got lesser results.

There is also a constant stream of over fifty coming in saying, Finally my life makes sense. They all worked. Some did quite well, the focus, learning, can pay off, but the disconnect is always there.

The Social Services meaning of disabled is narrow. It leaves nothing for the same people who by effort and income did not become economically disabled. They are just as autistic, have as many problems, have learned adaptive ways, which should be studied. Wrong Planet is full of them because there is no where else.

Back in the early days we noticed WP was half female. I joked it was because nerds were so studly and attractive. All the girls wanted to talk about was autism, and they were very good at it. All the Great Science of the time, that stuff ages faster than computers, said five boys for every girl.

I credit WP with changing that view, we now think half and half.

If Psychology means rubber stamping forms for State Disability payments, which is what they do, 90% do not work. If you are dealing with the problems of autistic people, more than half are in school, working, and hanging out on WP.

They all seem the same to me.

Just seeing girls as autistic almost doubled the epidemic. Without that fact, it seems the country will be all autistic in fifty years. Girls that work, boys that work, we could double this again.

Lies, damn lies, and Statistics.



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18 Nov 2011, 9:57 am

I voted other. A cure or treatment (though I don't think an actual cure will ever exist) administered during growth in the womb or early in life could improve the quality of life of their future selve. But that wouuld be very risky as first there needs to be an exact way of determining whether or not the developing child has the brain structure or genetics of an autistic. I don't think this will be possible because people get stuff wrong all the time, I was supposed to have spina bifida before I was born and I turned out completely healthy.

If there ever was a cure on the other hand, I don't think it should be given to anyone over the age of 3 because it will be a very big change to become accustomed to, anyone who's brain structure that changes over night will have quite an upheaval and may need to learn to do everything again. But short term treatments, such as an autism symptom version of paracetamol or something would be ideal for an older child or adult, especiallty those that are severe.


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18 Nov 2011, 3:34 pm

Gedrene wrote:
aghogday wrote:
There are all kind of intelligences, and abilities, no one holds them all. I made straight A's in schools, but my dreams were mostly playing team sports, which were well beyond my reach. The fact of the matter is I didn't have the type of intelligence to do the team sports, but I was good at answering questions on a test.
You don't need a whole different intelligence to know how to do team sports. You need to be physically fit and know who's going where and what to do next.


Being physically fit does not guarantee one the ability to play team sports. The same issues with the cerebellum that have been identified with Aspergers impact the ability of motor control that allows one to be profecient in playing team sports. I was in the top 10 percent of physical fitness with military standards, could play racquetball well, but did not have the inherent abilities required for team sports or for penmanship.



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18 Nov 2011, 4:29 pm

aghogday wrote:
Gedrene wrote:
aghogday wrote:
There are all kind of intelligences, and abilities, no one holds them all. I made straight A's in schools, but my dreams were mostly playing team sports, which were well beyond my reach. The fact of the matter is I didn't have the type of intelligence to do the team sports, but I was good at answering questions on a test.
You don't need a whole different intelligence to know how to do team sports. You need to be physically fit and know who's going where and what to do next.


Being physically fit does not guarantee one the ability to play team sports.

*facepalm*
aghogday wrote:
and know who's going where and what to do next

I said that. Don't ignore what I say.

aghogday wrote:
The same issues with the cerebellum that have been identified with Aspergers impact the ability of motor control that allows one to be profecient in playing team sports. I was in the top 10 percent of physical fitness with military standards, could play racquetball well, but did not have the inherent abilities required for team sports or for penmanship.
Ah, sending us on a merry game are we?
For starters motor skills have nothing to do with being good at racquetball but not team sports. They have everything to do with general physical ability, so to claim that you were good at Racquetball yet not good at team sports because of motor skills is nonsensical because for motor skills to be implicated you must be bad at both. Furthermore the whole idea of referring to team sports just simply sounds like an attempt to fudge in an intellectual stereotype that anything involving teams we are instantly worse at, and it is transparent given the justification is an inconsistent reference to motor skills, another stereotype.



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18 Nov 2011, 6:51 pm

Gedrene wrote:
aghogday wrote:
Gedrene wrote:
aghogday wrote:
There are all kind of intelligences, and abilities, no one holds them all. I made straight A's in schools, but my dreams were mostly playing team sports, which were well beyond my reach. The fact of the matter is I didn't have the type of intelligence to do the team sports, but I was good at answering questions on a test.
You don't need a whole different intelligence to know how to do team sports. You need to be physically fit and know who's going where and what to do next.


Being physically fit does not guarantee one the ability to play team sports.

*facepalm*
aghogday wrote:
and know who's going where and what to do next

I said that. Don't ignore what I say.

aghogday wrote:
The same issues with the cerebellum that have been identified with Aspergers impact the ability of motor control that allows one to be profecient in playing team sports. I was in the top 10 percent of physical fitness with military standards, could play racquetball well, but did not have the inherent abilities required for team sports or for penmanship.
Ah, sending us on a merry game are we?
For starters motor skills have nothing to do with being good at racquetball but not team sports. They have everything to do with general physical ability, so to claim that you were good at Racquetball yet not good at team sports because of motor skills is nonsensical because for motor skills to be implicated you must be bad at both. Furthermore the whole idea of referring to team sports just simply sounds like an attempt to fudge in an intellectual stereotype that anything involving teams we are instantly worse at, and it is transparent given the justification is an inconsistent reference to motor skills, another stereotype.


The motor skills required to play racquetball and the motor skills required to go out for a pass on a football field, or dribble a basketball in running are different.

Holding a racquet and the hand eye coordination required to hit a ball is not the same type of motor coordination required to dribble a basketball and remain coordinated doing this while running; same for going out for a football pass.

This is not specifically related to knowing where to go and what to do next. If one did not have those skills they wouldn't be able to drive a car. Not all people with Autism have problems with motor coordination, although researchers estimate that anywhere from 50 to 90 percent do have problems with motor coordination.

Fine motor skills is also an issue, but with enough practice one can over come these issues to a degree.



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18 Nov 2011, 7:07 pm

aghogday wrote:
The motor skills required to play racquetball and the motor skills required to go out for a pass on a football field, or dribble a basketball in running are different.
Don't try and sneak around this. You were talking about intelligence, not motor skills:
aghogday wrote:
The fact of the matter is I didn't have the type of intelligence to do the team sports, but I was good at answering questions on a test.



So now you are simply trying to change your tack.



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18 Nov 2011, 8:03 pm

Gedrene wrote:
aghogday wrote:
The motor skills required to play racquetball and the motor skills required to go out for a pass on a football field, or dribble a basketball in running are different.
Don't try and sneak around this. You were talking about intelligence, not motor skills:
aghogday wrote:
The fact of the matter is I didn't have the type of intelligence to do the team sports, but I was good at answering questions on a test.



So now you are simply trying to change your tack.


Not all intelligence is measured with an IQ test. Motor skills and coordination fall under Kinesthetic Intelligence:

Quote:
Kinesthetic Intelligence And Our Brain

The area of kinesthetic intelligence is located in the cerebellum and concerns the thalamus, main ganglions and others parts of the brain. The brain’s motor cortex controls bodily motion and people with this intelligence display dexterity and skills for fine motor movement.


http://www.dirjournal.com/guides/understanding-kinesthetic-intelligence/

They don't call it Physcial education for no reason.

Motor skills and coordination can be improved through physical education and some individuals have a higher level of kinesthetic intelligence than others.

The Cerebellum that contols this type of intelligence has been researched as different in some individuals diagnosed with Aspergers, which provides a potential physiological explanation for the differences in Kinesthetic intelligence that has been observed and measured in individuals with ASD's.



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19 Nov 2011, 5:06 am

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Theory_of_multiple_intelligences#Critical_reception

Wikipedia wrote:
A number of articles have surveyed the use of Gardner's ideas and conclude that there is little to no academically substantiated evidence that his ideas work in practice. Steven A. Stahl found that most of the previous studies which claimed to show positive results had major flaws:
Among others, Marie Carbo claims that her learning styles work is based on research. {I discuss Carbo because she publishes extensively on her model and is very prominent in the workshop circuit...} But given the overwhelmingly negative findings in the published research, I wondered what she was citing, and about a decade ago, I thought it would be interesting to take a look. Reviewing her articles, I found that out of 17 studies she had cited, only one was published. Fifteen were doctoral dissertations and 13 of these came out of one university—St. John’s University in New York, Carbo’s alma mater. None of these had been in a peer-refereed journal. When I looked closely at the dissertations and other materials, I found that 13 of the 17 studies that supposedly support her claim had to do with learning styles based on something other than modality.


You are advocating pseudoscience.

The fact is that you tried to say about intelligence, and then motor skills, and then went back and talked about kinesthetic intelligence because it stopped ou making a clearly bigotry driven assertion that aspies are less able to do team sports than normal sports. And all your switches are wrong.