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Delphiki
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27 Jun 2012, 12:13 am

I am starting to actually get some abdominal muscles, and it is becoming more obvious that they are uneven. The abs on my left side appear to be an inch or inch an a half lower than my right ab muscles. I googled it and it says that it is genetic. Frustrating.


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1000Knives
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27 Jun 2012, 12:30 am

Least you got low enough bodyfat to see them. That's what counts. Everyone has abs, just not everyone has low enough bodyfat to see them. Generally it's like 10ish%. But yeah, for some reason, abs are like, really important now. "Swole" is out and "toned" is in body fashion wise.

Oh well, just the way the cookie crumbles. Least you can see them.

Could be worse, you could have an HGH gut like Ronnie Coleman.
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Wolfheart
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27 Jun 2012, 12:56 am

Make sure you are doing oblique sit ups and cross legged sit ups. Also try doing static holds such as bow and boat, they will really help define your abs.



Delphiki
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27 Jun 2012, 12:59 am

I don't do sit-ups. When I was younger I was skinnier. So if I had to do sit-ups for gym class on a tile floor it hurt my spine


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Wolfheart
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27 Jun 2012, 1:01 am

Use an exercise or yoga mat or double up a mat, try taking up yoga or stretching, that will really help your lower back and condition your spine which will make it easier to do core exercises.



Delphiki
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27 Jun 2012, 1:12 am

Wolfheart wrote:
Use an exercise or yoga mat or double up a mat, try taking up yoga or stretching, that will really help your lower back and condition your spine which will make it easier to do core exercises.
I just don't like sit ups. At all. I am fine with just holding the up position of push-ups for 2 minutes, or doing planks. There are many other core exercises I can do besides sit ups or crunches


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1000Knives
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27 Jun 2012, 1:33 am

Delphiki wrote:
Wolfheart wrote:
Use an exercise or yoga mat or double up a mat, try taking up yoga or stretching, that will really help your lower back and condition your spine which will make it easier to do core exercises.
I just don't like sit ups. At all. I am fine with just holding the up position of push-ups for 2 minutes, or doing planks. There are many other core exercises I can do besides sit ups or crunches


If you want abs, deadlifts and front squats.

startingstrength.com/articles/abs_rippetoe.pdf

Great article by Mark Rippetoe on abs.

Quote:
Conversely, the abs’ job is primarily isometric, since spinal stabilization is their principal task. If the skeletal relationships they maintain are motionless, then their primary function is to exert force while allowing no position change, and to do this they must remain the same length under whatever load the spine must be stable against. Thus isometric contraction is their principle mode of action. They can be pressed into service to do a situp, acting concentrically/eccentrically to flex the spine while you are lying down, but it’s not their “normal” function, the one they have developed over millions of years to accomplish.


Quote:
This is important, because many coaches associate the presence of soreness with effective training and the absence of soreness as indicative that more work needs to be done. It is quite likely that this is the crux of the problem: abs get worked very hard when you use them in their normal isometric role, but they don’t get sore due to the lack of an eccentric component during heavy support. The fact that you’re sore indicates that the muscle belly got longer under a load, while an absence of soreness after heavy squats and pulls merely indicates that your abs did their job and kept your spine rigid. I’m suggesting here that the standard barbell exercises produce sufficient levels of ab work for their own purposes, and that, especially for novices, no other ab work is necessary.


For you, the planks are working, as your abs are doing their isometric supporting job.



Wolfheart
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27 Jun 2012, 1:44 am

Bow, Boat, Banana and plank will work for you if you aren't keen on sit ups, the best way to train your obliques for you would be to do torso twist holds. However you could still do oblique sit ups as you are on your side in that exercise.



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27 Jun 2012, 1:51 am

Here's Layne Norton, professional natural bodybuilder.

Image

Here's Mark Rippetoe when he was young, I can really spot the definition in his abdominal area.

Image



1000Knives
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27 Jun 2012, 1:56 am

I personally have decently developed obliques, so much so they're able to be seen even at my doughyish 20% BF. For me, what developed them was skating. I also do lots of slideboard. My first time on an oblique twist machine, I maxed it out for 10 reps. I'm thinking because the obliques are compressed when you do skating strokes... http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T1gMXNO3iYE There's an example of a slideboard, it's pretty close to ice skating stroking. I do it with dumbells in my hands sometimes, too.



Wolfheart
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27 Jun 2012, 2:16 am

Of course, power lifting isn't the best way to achieve the best definition though, I have found that correct diet mixed with high intensity training and specifically targeting the core area is best, I don't know if dirty bulking and power lifting would achieve what the thread creator is reach his personal goal.

Here's my abdominals from a couple of photos taken around 2 weeks ago.

Image
Image



1000Knives
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27 Jun 2012, 2:18 am

Wolfheart wrote:
Here's Layne Norton, professional natural bodybuilder.

Image

Here's Mark Rippetoe when he was young, I can really spot the definition in his abdominal area.

Image


That's Anatoly Pisarenko, a super heavyweight Olympic lifter, pretty much the best one ever. He competed in super heavyweight and looked more or less like a bodybuilder. He actually didn't gain weight with lots of fat like most super heavies. As far as him having abs, when you lift heavy like that, you breathe deep and fill your abdomen full of air to brace yourself, so thus, belly during the lift. You gotta admit, for a super heavy, he's not bad looking.

Image
That's Mark Rippetoe in the 80s, not gonna refute your point about Mark Rippetoe and abs, but hey.

Here's some OL lifters with abs, though, generally in the sub 200lb classes.
Image
Image
Maybe they do crunches, maybe they don't, some coaches recommend them and some don't. As far as obliques, though, they definitely got them doing heavy lifts. Most bodybuilders don't want a figure like that, as it messes with "v-taper" but I personally would rather look more "square" like that. The only bad thing I can say about compounds for ab development is, because you fill your gut with air to do the lifts (ie, breathe in heavily) and you're always bracing your abs forward, you can develop an weightlifter gut, basically, sorta like a milder version of Ronnie Coleman's HGH gut. I'll have to see how I turn out once/if I get down to 10%ish BF, but that can happen. A way to remedy that is do chest vacuums, but...meh.



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27 Jun 2012, 2:22 am

The guy with the shaved head has fairly good definition but that may due to different factors but I don't think that's the type of body one would typically achieve from power lifting on it's own or the image that power lifters usually promote. Again, it depends on personal goals and what he wants to achieve.

A person could say body building is the most ideal form of training for aesthetics but wouldn't be most ideal for someone that is a martial artist or dancer so it really depends on what type of sport, level of fitness or look the person is trying to achieve.



Wolfheart
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27 Jun 2012, 2:32 am

This is Ross Enamit, he uses a variety of training methods for boxing and martial arts. He also uses various lifts in his program such as dumbell snatches and swings.

Image

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=57pv_1j4dH0[/youtube]



1000Knives
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27 Jun 2012, 10:42 am

Wolfheart wrote:
The guy with the shaved head has fairly good definition but that may due to different factors but I don't think that's the type of body one would typically achieve from power lifting on it's own or the image that power lifters usually promote. Again, it depends on personal goals and what he wants to achieve.

A person could say body building is the most ideal form of training for aesthetics but wouldn't be most ideal for someone that is a martial artist or dancer so it really depends on what type of sport, level of fitness or look the person is trying to achieve.


Typically the people in lower weight classes have pretty good definition. Why? Because it's based on weight class. Fat is dead weight. Those pictures are Olympic lifting, though, not powerlifting. Even powerlifting, it's the same, though. Keep in mind, some of them in their weight classes are within ounces of going into the next class, so obviously at the elite level diet is quite important.

http://tnation.t-nation.com/free_online ... re_fatties
That's Dave Gulledge, he's a powerlifter that competed at 325, and dieted down to 265 after an injury.

Quote:
CD: Name some of your other feats of strength?

DG: I've never lifted a car off a child or anything. In the gym I really just squat, bench, deadlift, and do good mornings.

http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/dennis76.htm

As far as image, I can agree with you, however....that's an entirely different discussion. But, what I'm saying is, the abdominal muscles are worked very well off compound exercises, whether or not you eat and gain/don't lose bodyfat is your prerogative.

Not to stir the pot too much more, but bodybuilders in the off season are usually pretty doughy. http://elitekinetics.files.wordpress.co ... commit.jpg Lee Priest off season vs contest.



Last edited by 1000Knives on 27 Jun 2012, 10:44 am, edited 1 time in total.