Page 1 of 2 [ 19 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next

LonelyJar
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 15 Sep 2013
Gender: Male
Posts: 2,027

12 Nov 2013, 11:51 pm

I apologize if this question has already been asked, but does anyone have ideas on how to have a low-gluten & low-lactose diet?



auntblabby
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 12 Feb 2010
Gender: Male
Posts: 93,736
Location: the island of defective toy santas

13 Nov 2013, 2:43 am

I would just avoid or drastically reduce intake of anything white in general [IOW no sugar, no starch, no potatoes or corn, no wheat/gluten including breads and pastas and even seitan, no milk products]. you would increase your intake of soy, of things like quinoa, oats, black or brown rice, lean red meat, fish and poultry. I myself am doing most of this with the exception of cheese which I include with the meat because the combination forms conjugated lineolic acid chains which are beneficial.



Mackica
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 15 Nov 2010
Gender: Female
Posts: 637

14 Nov 2013, 4:28 pm

I've seen almond yogurt and coconut yogurt in my health food store.You can make almond and other nut mylks at home if you have a food processor.When it comes to gluten,there are so many other grains to try.Spelt,corn,rye,millet,brown rice flour,the list goes on and on.



Kjas
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 26 Feb 2012
Age: 30
Gender: Female
Posts: 6,059
Location: the place I'm from doesn't exist anymore

14 Nov 2013, 9:32 pm

Dairy alternatives tend to be almond milk, coconut milk, coconut yogurt, coconut ice cream, coconut cream etc.

Gluten and wheat alternatives tend to be almond flour, corn flour if you can handle it, cassava flour. For staples pumpkin, sweet potato, cassava, taro, plantain, malanga and yams. Most of these can be brought at the local Asian or Latin markets for less than you would pay in a normal supermarket.


_________________
Diagnostic Tools and Resources for Women with AS: http://www.wrongplanet.net/postt211004.html


blueroses
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 10 Feb 2007
Age: 37
Gender: Female
Posts: 1,981
Location: Lancaster, PA

15 Nov 2013, 7:56 pm

What everyone else has said. Plus, it really helps if you have an open mind and don't expect alternatives to taste exactly like the foods you are trying to replace, but just enjoy them in their own right. For example, almond milk tastes great to me, but if I wanted it to taste exactly like dairy milk, I'd be left feeling really disappointed. Also, going GF/CF can be expensive if you buy a lot of convenience foods, but very doable, if you like to and/or are willing to learn to cook from scratch.



ASDsmom
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 27 Apr 2011
Gender: Female
Posts: 803

15 Nov 2013, 11:52 pm

Try goat milk products..

"Although goat milk contains lactose, people with lactose intolerance can drink goat milk. Goat milk is more easily absorbed than cow's milk, leaving less undigested residue behind in the colon to ferment and cause the uncomfortable symptoms of lactose intolerance. The digestibility of goat milk can be attributed to its casein curd, which is both softer and smaller than that produced by bovine milk. The smaller and softer the curd, the more easily accepted by the human digestive system."

It doesn't mean you won't be sensitive to goat milk but it could mean that you can use it as a substitute if your body is able to tolerate it.



Uprising
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 9 Jan 2012
Gender: Male
Posts: 3,908

16 Nov 2013, 10:07 am

auntblabby wrote:
you would increase your intake of soy

f**k that!

I would also not advice rice milk or almond milk.

If you're looking for a pure milk replacement => water imo.



auntblabby
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 12 Feb 2010
Gender: Male
Posts: 93,736
Location: the island of defective toy santas

16 Nov 2013, 9:13 pm

high intake of soy does not appear to be harming large world populations of Asians.



blueroses
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 10 Feb 2007
Age: 37
Gender: Female
Posts: 1,981
Location: Lancaster, PA

16 Nov 2013, 10:58 pm

Uprising wrote:
I would also not advice rice milk or almond milk.


Really, why do you say that?



Kjas
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 26 Feb 2012
Age: 30
Gender: Female
Posts: 6,059
Location: the place I'm from doesn't exist anymore

16 Nov 2013, 11:00 pm

auntblabby wrote:
high intake of soy does not appear to be harming large world populations of Asians.


It's not healthy for anyone with a thyroid condition or those at risk of developing one, or someone who may be sensitive in that aspect.

Also soy production has changed quite radically in recent years and we still have no idea of what those effects will be.

Uprising wrote:
f**k that!

I would also not advice rice milk or almond milk.

If you're looking for a pure milk replacement => water imo.


For someone like me where water is pretty much the only thing I drink - even I need some variety, even if it's only once a week. Almond milk if unsweetened and produced correctly or homemade isn't really harmful - in fact a good percentage of the fat in it, your body can't even absorb and simply passes through.


_________________
Diagnostic Tools and Resources for Women with AS: http://www.wrongplanet.net/postt211004.html


ASDsmom
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 27 Apr 2011
Gender: Female
Posts: 803

17 Nov 2013, 9:39 pm

auntblabby wrote:
high intake of soy does not appear to be harming large world populations of Asians.


"Soy is a goitrogen, which means it blocks uptake of iodine, which the thyroid needs. This can cause hypothyroidism, hyperthyroidism, and thyroid cancer.

Other organs that need iodine the most are the breasts and ovaries. Women in Japan eat the highest amount of iodine (traditionally about 13 mg per day) in the form of fish stock and seaweed. They also have one of the lowest rates of breast cancer.

Interestingly, the Japanese do not eat very much soy. It is used as a condiment, and most of the soy they eat is fermented (for a few years). The fermentation breaks down the phytic acid and goitrogens. Also, they can handle the soy intake due to their very high intake of iodine. Americans get very little iodine because the soil is depleted of minerals and we do eat a lot of soy (whether we know it or not). In addition to that, there’s the isoflavones in soy which are hormone disrupters. And soy is very hard to digest."

^^
I recently came across this blurb that made a lot of sense to me. Don't ask me where I found it because I no longer have that source. Good info to think about though.



auntblabby
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 12 Feb 2010
Gender: Male
Posts: 93,736
Location: the island of defective toy santas

17 Nov 2013, 9:42 pm

^^^
natto is an acquired taste. I would like to try it, though. my soy is limited to the occasional fauxmeat treat, soy sauce, and occasional treats of tofu.



ASDsmom
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 27 Apr 2011
Gender: Female
Posts: 803

17 Nov 2013, 9:43 pm

^^

Read your ingredients. Soy is in everything, unfortunately .. much like corn, wheat and sugar.



auntblabby
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 12 Feb 2010
Gender: Male
Posts: 93,736
Location: the island of defective toy santas

17 Nov 2013, 9:47 pm

ASDsmom wrote:
^^

Read your ingredients. Soy is in everything, unfortunately .. much like corn, wheat and sugar.

I do read my ingredients these days so I can avoid wheat products and corn syrup and fructose and sugar and partially hydrogenated artery cloggers and such. the food makers have gotten very creative in their use of language though so as to thwart my attempts to eat healthier.



ASDsmom
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 27 Apr 2011
Gender: Female
Posts: 803

17 Nov 2013, 9:52 pm

I agree and what boggles my mind is that they're allowed to disguise their labels!!

EDIT: Found this tidbit:

The majority of soy's health claims are false; fostered by clever marketing to further reduce the cost and nutritional content of your food.

Ninety-four percent of all soy grown in the US is genetically engineered (GE), which virtually guarantees you're consuming GE soy when purchasing soy products and processed foods containing soy derivatives. Genetically engineered foods pose its own separate health risks, including hormone disruption and fertility problems.

Soy derivatives can "hide" under a variety of different names, including mono-diglyceride, soya, soja, yuba, TSF (textured soy flour), TSP (textured soy protein), TVP (textured vegetable protein), lecithin, and MSG

Soy protein isolate can be found in protein bars, meal replacement shakes, bottled fruit drinks, soups and sauces, meat analogs, baked goods, breakfast cereals and dietary supplements. This hazardous ingredient has been linked to several troubling conditions, including diminished libido and erectile dysfunction.

The only soy foods with health benefits are USDA certified 100% organic, traditionally fermented soy products such as tempeh, miso and natto