Decision: Will you wash your hands after using the bathroom?

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jimmy m
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24 Oct 2019, 9:48 am

In 2017, they [Royal Pharmaceutical Society (RPS) in the U.K.] surveyed more than 2,000 people and found that 84 percent don’t scrub their hands with soap and water for the recommended minimum of 20 seconds. More disturbingly, 21 percent admitted they do not always wash their hands after leaving the bathroom.

Experts have revealed that failure to wash hands after leaving the bathroom is more likely to spread drug-resistant E. coli than consuming raw or under-cooked meat.

According to the study, the potentially fatal bacterium’s “likeliest route” is through human poop particles, which generally spreads through poor bathroom hygiene.

Last year, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention investigated nearly 3,000 cases of Escherichia coli. Researchers pinpoint one type — Extended-Spectrum Beta-Lactamase (ESBL)-producing E. coli — as one that is particularly difficult to treat.

“Rather — and unpalatably — the likeliest route of transmission for ESBL-E.coli is directly from human to human, with fecal particles from one person reaching the mouth of another,” said University of East Anglia professor David Livermore, whose study is published in The Lancet Infectious Diseases journal.

Livermore and his colleagues in the UK tested samples of beef, pork and chicken and analyzed those results against samples of human feces, sewerage and blood. They discovered that strains between the human samples were similar, but different from those found in animals.

They say this indicates there is “little crossover” of ESBL-E. coli between humans and animals, said Livermore, meaning it’s being spread primarily between humans.

Source: Not washing your hands after using bathroom worse than eating raw meat, study finds

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So why is this important for Aspies?

#1. Aspies tend to have weakened immune systems (due to overwhelming stress).
#2. The recent evolution of superbugs.

Superbugs are resistant to all forms of antibiotics. For anyone becoming infected with a superbug bacteria, the only avenue available for treatment is their internal body's immune system.

“Infections caused by ESBL-E. coli bacteria are difficult to treat. And they are becoming more common in both the community and hospitals,” said Livermore. “Mortality rates among people infected with these super-bug strains are double those of people infected with strains that are susceptible to treatment.”


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AnonymousAnonymous
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29 Oct 2019, 3:37 pm

I always wash my hands after I relieve myself because IMO, it is common sense.


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29 Oct 2019, 10:43 pm

I invented my own soap stick. I collect my old lip balm tubes since I never go anywhere without my lip balm in my pocket and I put the soap in the empty lip balm tubes. When I need to wash my hands in public, I rub a bit of my own soap on my hands and lather away. I have chemical sensitivities so my invention was born from necessity since I simply will not use public bathroom soaps from the dispensers.


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Fireblossom
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30 Oct 2019, 6:26 am

Of course. If there's no soap, I use hotter water and longer.



Noca
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31 Oct 2019, 12:50 am

I doubt peoples behavior has changed so these observations in this article are nothing new. Most strains of ecoli are harmless. This failure of handwashing has been the case for forever likely and there's nothing really anyone can do to change others. Overly clean environments can in certain age children cause allergies and asthma to develop.


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bluesky11
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09 Nov 2019, 12:12 am

I struggle with hand washing sometimes because of the aversion to cold water on my hands and also loud hand dryers.

Sometimes though I am eager to if my hands feel dusty or sticky.

I know the health statistics but sometimes my brain wins and I don't wash my hands.



guitarman2010
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02 Jan 2020, 12:46 am

When I spent some time incarcerated on a couple different occasions, hand washing (or I should say "rinsing") was an unspoken rule in there. If someone went to the bathroom and relieved themself without washing or "rinsing" their hands, they were subjected to what always seemed immediate ridicule from other inmates. Sometimes there was a nasty bar or soap to use at the sink, most of the times there wasn't. As long as the person at least rinsed their hands off, it was fine.

That was the only time though really I would wash my hands after using the restroom, unless of course I had some bad diarrhea that was quite messy lol


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smudge
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02 Jan 2020, 4:13 am

I always wash my hands. I don't understand why people use taps though, you touch the same tap you touched before with dirty hands and so did everybody else. :?

The 20 second rule is unheard of amongst the public here. Few people would take it seriously anyway, especially since the last 15 years or so, a lot of people here have coughed without covering their mouths. It's really bad manners, let alone disgusting.



jimmy m
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02 Jan 2020, 10:39 am

smudge wrote:
I always wash my hands. I don't understand why people use taps though, you touch the same tap you touched before with dirty hands and so did everybody else. :?

The 20 second rule is unheard of amongst the public here. Few people would take it seriously anyway, especially since the last 15 years or so, a lot of people here have coughed without covering their mouths. It's really bad manners, let alone disgusting.


"Taps" is an interesting word. It must be British. Had to look it up. In the States we would call it knobs, such as hot and cold faucet knobs. Taps in the States would be someone tapping their fingers on a desk, or someone tap dancing.

It is interesting to see many Japanese people wearing surgical facemask. Initially I would interpret that custom as being oversensitive to germs, trying to avoid them. But now I understand it is a custom they employ if they are sick and worried about spreading their germs. It is like the opposite of people not covering their mouths when they cough. The Japanese are very polite.


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02 Jan 2020, 10:57 am

Hmm, another to add to the American English vs. British English thread. Lol, in England we have another name for "knob".



Fnord
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02 Jan 2020, 11:58 am

"Bibs", "Faucets" and "Taps" are what they are called in the States.  "Knobs" are what you use to adjust settings on old-time radios and TVs.  "Knobbers" are something else entirely.


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BenderRodriguez
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02 Jan 2020, 12:07 pm

Yes, I wash my hands. I'm not... anal about it or germophobic but I wash.

The only times I get a cold is when someone brings it to work and shares it with all of us, I'd rather have them stay home and do their work while they're away than have everyone picking it up and passing it on for the next 3 months :twisted:


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dragonsanddemons
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02 Jan 2020, 12:29 pm

I don't time myself to know that I get 20 seconds, but I always thoroughly wash my hands with soap and water after using the bathroom, every time. By now it's habitual, I do it without even thinking.


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jimmy m
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02 Jan 2020, 6:32 pm

smudge wrote:
Hmm, another to add to the American English vs. British English thread. Lol, in England we have another name for "knob".


Here is a link to an interesting article you may enjoy:
88 very British phrases that will confuse anybody who didn't grow up in the UK

For example: "Sod's law" - A British axiom that boils down to the idea that: "If anything can go wrong, then it definitely will go wrong."
"Sod's law" is often used to explain bad luck or freakish acts of misfortune. This is more commonly known in the US as "Murphy's law."


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smudge
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02 Jan 2020, 7:23 pm

jimmy m wrote:
smudge wrote:
Hmm, another to add to the American English vs. British English thread. Lol, in England we have another name for "knob".


Here is a link to an interesting article you may enjoy:
88 very British phrases that will confuse anybody who didn't grow up in the UK

For example: "Sod's law" - A British axiom that boils down to the idea that: "If anything can go wrong, then it definitely will go wrong."
"Sod's law" is often used to explain bad luck or freakish acts of misfortune. This is more commonly known in the US as "Murphy's law."


Thanks. Why would I find a list of commonly used words in my own country interesting?