Page 1 of 1 [ 9 posts ] 

FranzOren
Veteran
Veteran

Joined: 10 Jun 2019
Gender: Male
Posts: 916

11 Apr 2021, 9:59 am

Is there such a thing as stressed-induced bipolar disorder?

I have Bipolar Disorder with history of psychotic features. There were no drugs in my system that cased me to have Bipolar Disorder with history of psychotic features.

It might have been stressed induced when my freshman year in high school was very stressful. And because I have ASD, I became manic, depressed and psychotic, because I was in the wrong environment.
If there is no such thing as Stressed-induced Bipolar Disorder, what caused me to be manic, depressed and psychotic?

I tend to have these episodes if my environment changed without notice.

I have Autism Spectrum Disorder

I also have Learning Disorder, ADHD and Bipolar Disorder with history of psychotic features.



FranzOren
Veteran
Veteran

Joined: 10 Jun 2019
Gender: Male
Posts: 916

11 Apr 2021, 11:16 am

My environment changed and I had hard time making new friends. I was scared and sometimes hide or run away from my classroom to find aliens and had manic and depressive episodes. I fantasized about working for the military to find aliens.

I also had hallucinations that the military police was going after me and that there was police brutality against everyone.

In my hallucination, I saw military police attacking highs school students.

It scared the hell out of me! Imagine having this type of psychosis, even if it is short. It torments and traumatizes me!

Can I get PTSD from psychosis?

I have symptoms of flashbacks, nightmares and severe anxiety, as well as uncontrollable thoughts from my psychosis that I once had.



FranzOren
Veteran
Veteran

Joined: 10 Jun 2019
Gender: Male
Posts: 916

11 Apr 2021, 11:17 am

I am just speculating that I might have PTSD and I will talk about it to my psychiatrist and my school psychologist about it.

I don't want to self-diagnose myself with anything, because I am not a doctor to myself.



kitesandtrainsandcats
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 6 May 2016
Age: 57
Gender: Male
Posts: 2,135
Location: Missouri

11 Apr 2021, 12:06 pm

FranzOren wrote:
Is there such a thing as stressed-induced bipolar disorder?


Doing some searching, the answer appears to be, Yes.
Both in the initial onset of bipolar & in triggering flareups of it.

Some sample finds:

On the UK's NHS website, stress is listed first in the section of triggers for bipolar,
https://www.nhs.uk/mental-health/condit ... er/causes/
Quote:
Triggers
A stressful circumstance or situation often triggers the symptoms of bipolar disorder.


And then from a study documented in the US,
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3748240/
Quote:
Conclusions
Overall chronic stressors seem to be an important determinant of depressive symptoms within bipolar disorder, highlighting the importance of studying multiple forms of life stress.


From a general health website,
https://www.verywellmind.com/what-cause ... der-378711
Quote:
Societal Factors

Mood episodes in bipolar disorder can both be set off by a stressful event or circumstances, but can and frequently do occur spontaneously.

How stress triggers a bipolar episode is not fully understood. But scientists do believe that the stress hormone cortisol plays a role. Stress increases the level of cortisol in the body, which causes alterations in how the brain functions and communicates. In fact, in people who have depression or bipolar disorder, cortisol levels may stay high even when stress isn't present.

Stressful life events can range from a death in the family to the loss of a job, and from the birth of a child to a move.

Stress may stem from a variety of experiences. It cannot be precisely defined, since one person may perceive an event as extremely stressful while another individual encountering the same event may not experience much stress.

Stressful life events can lead to the onset of symptoms in bipolar disorder. However, once the disorder is triggered and progresses, "it seems to develop a life of its own." Once the cycle begins, psychological and/or biological processes take over and keep the illness active.


_________________
"There are a thousand things that can happen when you go light a rocket engine, and only one of them is good."
Tom Mueller of SpaceX, in Air and Space, Jan. 2011


FranzOren
Veteran
Veteran

Joined: 10 Jun 2019
Gender: Male
Posts: 916

11 Apr 2021, 12:22 pm

Thank you!



FranzOren
Veteran
Veteran

Joined: 10 Jun 2019
Gender: Male
Posts: 916

11 Apr 2021, 2:04 pm

I have some reports in my IEP that I would say racist things. Is that normal when having manic episode?

I feel ashamed of myself!

I am sorry! I can't forgive myself for what I have done when I had an episode.

I am upset at myself! I feel depressed and ashamed of myself.



kitesandtrainsandcats
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 6 May 2016
Age: 57
Gender: Male
Posts: 2,135
Location: Missouri

11 Apr 2021, 10:48 pm

FranzOren wrote:
I have some reports in my IEP that I would say racist things. Is that normal when having manic episode?

Having had several friends who are bipolar I'm going to say that being different from how you are when you are not manic is normal.

Quote:
I can't forgive myself for what I have done when I had an episode.

I am going to say that for your own mental health you have to.
Note: there is a misapplied belief that forgiveness means a thing was okay, just fine, no damage done; that is not what forgiveness is.

Note the following; especially that last bit about relationships,
Taking the Steps to Forgive Yourself
By Kendra Cherry
Reviewed by Amy Morin, LCSW
Updated on February 17, 2021
Quote:
Benefits

The standard axiom within psychology has been that forgiveness is a good thing and that it conveys a number of benefits, whether you have experienced a minor slight or have suffered a much more serious grievance. This includes both forgiving others as well as yourself.

Mental Health

Letting go and offering yourself forgiveness can help boost your feelings of wellness and improve your image of yourself. Numerous studies have demonstrated that when people practice self-forgiveness, they experience lower levels of depression and anxiety. Similarly, self-compassion is associated with higher levels of success, productivity, focus, and concentration.

Physical Health

The act of forgiveness can also positively impact your physical health. Research shows that forgiveness can improve cholesterol levels, reduce bodily pain, and blood pressure, and lower your risk of a heart attack.

Relationships

Having a compassionate and forgiving attitude toward yourself is also a critical component of successful relationships. Being able to forge close emotional bonds with other people is important, but so is the ability to repair those bonds when they become fraught or damaged.


https://www.verywellmind.com/how-to-for ... lf-4583819


_________________
"There are a thousand things that can happen when you go light a rocket engine, and only one of them is good."
Tom Mueller of SpaceX, in Air and Space, Jan. 2011


funeralxempire
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 27 Oct 2014
Age: 36
Gender: Male
Posts: 10,917
Location: I'm on the streets like curbs

11 Apr 2021, 10:59 pm

FranzOren wrote:
I have some reports in my IEP that I would say racist things. Is that normal when having manic episode?

I feel ashamed of myself!

I am sorry! I can't forgive myself for what I have done when I had an episode.

I am upset at myself! I feel depressed and ashamed of myself.


That's more like an insight into what you think on a deeper level than what you're willing to admit you think. Saying things that you'd otherwise be inhibited against saying is a common part of mania.


_________________
politics is dumb but very important
戦争ではなく戦争と戦う


FranzOren
Veteran
Veteran

Joined: 10 Jun 2019
Gender: Male
Posts: 916

12 Apr 2021, 1:28 am

Thank you!