Page 1 of 4 [ 50 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2, 3, 4  Next

Inuit
Tufted Titmouse
Tufted Titmouse

User avatar

Joined: 6 Nov 2009
Gender: Male
Posts: 49
Location: England

24 Sep 2014, 10:33 am

I have schizoaffective (schizophrenia plus depression). My psychiatrist thinks I could also have aspergers/ASD.

Anyone else have a comorbid condition or a dual diagnosis?



calstar2
Deinonychus
Deinonychus

User avatar

Joined: 24 Jul 2014
Age: 26
Gender: Female
Posts: 332

24 Sep 2014, 11:12 am

Uh I believe a diagnosis of schizophrenia rules out autism?



Inuit
Tufted Titmouse
Tufted Titmouse

User avatar

Joined: 6 Nov 2009
Gender: Male
Posts: 49
Location: England

24 Sep 2014, 11:55 am

That's what I though. Psych seems to think could have both



Sweetleaf
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 6 Jan 2011
Gender: Female
Posts: 30,954
Location: Somewhere in Colorado

24 Sep 2014, 12:43 pm

calstar2 wrote:
Uh I believe a diagnosis of schizophrenia rules out autism?


Not necessarily, only if the schizophrenia accounts for all of the symptoms...


_________________
Hail Satan!


Sweetleaf
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 6 Jan 2011
Gender: Female
Posts: 30,954
Location: Somewhere in Colorado

24 Sep 2014, 12:45 pm

I have aspergers/autism...as well as Major Depression, PTSD, Generalized Anxiety and apparently traits of Avoident P.D so whatever, I sometimes feel like for all I know there could be something more but could just be that I can never get enough sleep or rest because of the PTSD.


_________________
Hail Satan!


beneficii
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 10 May 2005
Age: 36
Gender: Female
Posts: 7,433

24 Sep 2014, 8:17 pm

Gender dysphoria in addition to the Asperger's/ASD. My current doctor is insistent I don't have anything like bipolar disorder, schizoaffective disorder, or schizophrenia.


_________________
"You have a responsibility to consider all sides of a problem and a responsibility to make a judgment and a responsibility to care for all involved." --Ian Danskin


Inuit
Tufted Titmouse
Tufted Titmouse

User avatar

Joined: 6 Nov 2009
Gender: Male
Posts: 49
Location: England

25 Sep 2014, 10:52 am

I'd class myself as having some form of gender dysphoria. Felt it my whole life:(



WildTaltos
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 17 Apr 2013
Age: 119
Gender: Male
Posts: 683
Location: Contae Ciarraí, Éire

25 Sep 2014, 9:10 pm

i got diagnosedd with depresion follow by bipolar follow by aspergers followed by psychosis disorder NOS. i got a genetic test done and fuond out i had leopard/noonan syndrome and that suposedly can cause some of the things associate with autism so Ive begun doubt my autism diagnosis and i dont put any credence in the bipolar and psychosis. i do know im depressed though, i struggle with that alll the time.


_________________
Níb caram-si, á Áes catha


BeggingTurtle
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 11 Jun 2013
Gender: Male
Posts: 1,518
Location: New England

26 Sep 2014, 11:16 pm

I have Tourettes, OCD, and Borderline Personality Disorder. I'm pretty much everywhere!


_________________
Shedding your shell can be hard.
Diagnosed Level 1 autism, Tourettes + ADHD + OCD age 9, recovering Borderline personality disorder (age 16)


PerfectlyDarkTails
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 13 Mar 2012
Gender: Male
Posts: 838
Location: Wales

26 Sep 2014, 11:41 pm

Tourettes, chronic migraines, accute anxiety, dyslexia/Dispraxia.

Was ruled out of a Schiz... Disorder considering all symptoms where present since very early childhood or born with it, while my symptoms never "developed" more recently. The voices I do have are considered a more common part of Asperger's than Schiz,,, mine are positive and friendly voices that help soothe meltdowns and distract from pain. It's is on part of imagination play that stays sort of stuck, again, these voices developed from traumas and neglect on part not discovering an ASD earlier. The voices do not get more extreme, louder or demonic etc... typical of mental sickness as I've been told.


_________________
"When you begin to realize your own existence and break out of the social norm, then others know you have completely lost your mind." -PerfectlyDarkTails

AS 168/200, NT: 20/ 200, AQ=45 EQ=15, SQ=78, IQ=135


Moonranch
Raven
Raven

User avatar

Joined: 13 Jan 2013
Gender: Female
Posts: 124
Location: UK

30 Sep 2014, 11:53 am

As well as Asperger Syndrome I have depression, anxiety, OCD and an eating disorder. I think I may also have PTSD. I am not very mentally healthy.


_________________
I'm not a guy!


Feralucce
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 24 Feb 2012
Age: 46
Gender: Male
Posts: 2,257
Location: New Orleans, LA

30 Sep 2014, 12:23 pm

I recommend a new Psych. According to diagnostic criteria, schizophrenia and autistic spectrum disorders are mutually exclusive diagnoses.

Autism does not come with schizophrenia and as a matter of fact according to both the DSM-IV and ICD-10, the diagnoses are mutually exclusive: ?criteria are not met for another specific Pervasive Developmental Disorder or schizophrenia?, as stated in the DSM-IV.


_________________
Yeah. I'm done. Don't bother messaging and expecting a response - i've left WP permanently.


beneficii
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 10 May 2005
Age: 36
Gender: Female
Posts: 7,433

30 Sep 2014, 12:36 pm

Feralucce wrote:
I recommend a new Psych. According to diagnostic criteria, schizophrenia and autistic spectrum disorders are mutually exclusive diagnoses.

Autism does not come with schizophrenia and as a matter of fact according to both the DSM-IV and ICD-10, the diagnoses are mutually exclusive: ?criteria are not met for another specific Pervasive Developmental Disorder or schizophrenia?, as stated in the DSM-IV.


Actually, they can be comorbid. If the patient develops the ASD first, and then later develops schizophrenia, they can be comorbid. It's only that once a patient develops schizophrenia then they cannot develop an ASD afterwards (as the symptoms would be considered to be "explained" by the schizophrenia). The DSM, however, makes clear that for someone who already has an ASD, they must have prominent delusions and/or hallucinations for at least one month (or less if successfully treated) to be diagnosed with schizophrenia. Basically, for someone with an ASD, having just, say, disorganized speech and negative symptoms without prominent delusions or hallucinations wouldn't cut it, whereas for someone without an ASD disorganized speech and negative symptoms would be enough (provided other criteria are met). The reason is to prevent the comorbidity from being greater, because disorganized speech and negative symptoms tend to already occur to some extent in an ASD anyway, so they can be considered to be "explained" by the ASD. Prominent delusions and/or hallucinations are the only schizophrenia symptoms that cannot be explained by an ASD, so those would allow a person with ASD to be diagnosed with comorbid schizophrenia (provided all other disorders are ruled out and all the other criteria are met), in the DSM at least.


_________________
"You have a responsibility to consider all sides of a problem and a responsibility to make a judgment and a responsibility to care for all involved." --Ian Danskin


beneficii
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 10 May 2005
Age: 36
Gender: Female
Posts: 7,433

30 Sep 2014, 12:45 pm

To back this up, this is Criterion F for schizophrenia in the DSM-5 (similar wording exists in the DSM-IV criteria), which regards a patient with an ASD (p. 99):

Quote:
F. If there is a history of autism spectrum disorder or a communication disorder of childhood onset, the additional diagnosis of schizophrenia is made only if prominent delusions or hallucinations, in addition to the other required symptoms of schizophrenia, are also present for at least 1 month (or less if successfully treated).


_________________
"You have a responsibility to consider all sides of a problem and a responsibility to make a judgment and a responsibility to care for all involved." --Ian Danskin


Feralucce
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 24 Feb 2012
Age: 46
Gender: Male
Posts: 2,257
Location: New Orleans, LA

30 Sep 2014, 11:31 pm

beneficii wrote:
Feralucce wrote:
I recommend a new Psych. According to diagnostic criteria, schizophrenia and autistic spectrum disorders are mutually exclusive diagnoses.

Autism does not come with schizophrenia and as a matter of fact according to both the DSM-IV and ICD-10, the diagnoses are mutually exclusive: ?criteria are not met for another specific Pervasive Developmental Disorder or schizophrenia?, as stated in the DSM-IV.


Actually, they can be comorbid. If the patient develops the ASD first, and then later develops schizophrenia, they can be comorbid. It's only that once a patient develops schizophrenia then they cannot develop an ASD afterwards (as the symptoms would be considered to be "explained" by the schizophrenia). The DSM, however, makes clear that for someone who already has an ASD, they must have prominent delusions and/or hallucinations for at least one month (or less if successfully treated) to be diagnosed with schizophrenia. Basically, for someone with an ASD, having just, say, disorganized speech and negative symptoms without prominent delusions or hallucinations wouldn't cut it, whereas for someone without an ASD disorganized speech and negative symptoms would be enough (provided other criteria are met). The reason is to prevent the comorbidity from being greater, because disorganized speech and negative symptoms tend to already occur to some extent in an ASD anyway, so they can be considered to be "explained" by the ASD. Prominent delusions and/or hallucinations are the only schizophrenia symptoms that cannot be explained by an ASD, so those would allow a person with ASD to be diagnosed with comorbid schizophrenia (provided all other disorders are ruled out and all the other criteria are met), in the DSM at least.


I disagree. As do my Psychiatric professional sources. The two are mutual exclusive diagnoses.


_________________
Yeah. I'm done. Don't bother messaging and expecting a response - i've left WP permanently.