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funeralxempire
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08 Nov 2020, 2:22 pm

Lace-Bane wrote:
technique is kinda rusty, but a personalized les paul studio is had, with flat wound strings, and lace nitro hemi pickups almost ever set to single coil at the bridge, typically played in a classical sitting position with a foot stool to be able to reach all of the higher frets cleanly.

classical guitar method, music theory(trying to work up to jazz theory, as improv is of interest.), and learning solo violin sheet music(gives ideas for soloing, while serving as good technical whetstones, and endurance training.) are worked on for a couple hours a day during weekdays(typically unplugged), while the game “rocksmith 2014” has been fooled around with on weekends through headphones lately(apartment).

at some point, fretless bass guitar, and keyboard, are also of interest to acquire and learn, as to be able to compose, and record, full pieces.


I used to play with flatwounds but they're really not well suited for how and what I play. :lol:

I still like the feel of them.



Lace-Bane
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12 Nov 2020, 9:54 am

funeralxempire wrote:
I used to play with flatwounds but they're really not well suited for how and what I play. :lol:

I still like the feel of them.
yeah, there’s certainly a tradeoff, sounding much more full and warm in clean parts with spring reverb, but making high gain muddy, requiring cleaner stronger pickups, boosts, and meticulous setting adjustments to bite through. they were gotten for the quiet slides to open up the fretboard in quickly slipping into notes without that metallic shriek, or string-burn.

auntblabby wrote:
magz wrote:
auntblabby wrote:
magz wrote:
Classical guitar.
Not much recently, my children have very different taste from me :/

as a journeyman guitarist, would you say that after 3 years of no progress, that one should just give up, that one simply lacks the genes for it?

Not necessarily.
Training your hands to handle guitar can take time and effort.
How often do you play?

for the first two years, every day, but my left hand and fingers could never tolerate more than an hour of struggling to bend, tops, and i'd have to take frequent breaks and shake out my left hand. i have a MUCH easier and more natural time with the baritone uke. the tenor guitar [classical with nylon] is just too stiff-strung for comfort, esp. the higher strings. but i can play a baritone uke easily for an hour. i was able to progress on the uke but not the guitar.
guitar is athletics for the fine muscles in your hands that you’ll never use much elsewhere, so they start out atrophied. if one hour was too taxing, you were practicing too much. you should never play with a mindset of “no pain no gain”, as that’s a fast track to carpal tunnel.

if you try again someday, start slow, even if only ten minutes daily, and gradually work up endurance, while stopping whenever muscles start trembling or aching.


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auntblabby
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12 Nov 2020, 10:44 am

i tried playing the other day, just a few minutes, and my left hand and wrist were unusably sore for several days afterwards.



PhosphorusDecree
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12 Nov 2020, 4:45 pm

auntblabby wrote:
have you tried plucking the cello? i heard players plucking and even strumming it in jazz. my baritone uke [kala] feels and sounds a bit like an alto guitar.


My hand-ear co-ordination just isn't good enough for playing fretless instruments. There's a scheme I keep meaning to try:
Buy a violin from a charity shop.
Give it frets by tying loops of nylon strings round the neck.
Play it stood vertically in my lap, the way they do in southern India.
Result: a bowed string instrument that a clumsy guitarist like me can play.
(Alternatively, I could blow a couple of month's pay on a treble viol. But I'm too poor and too mean.)


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auntblabby
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13 Nov 2020, 2:09 am

PhosphorusDecree wrote:
auntblabby wrote:
have you tried plucking the cello? i heard players plucking and even strumming it in jazz. my baritone uke [kala] feels and sounds a bit like an alto guitar.


My hand-ear co-ordination just isn't good enough for playing fretless instruments. There's a scheme I keep meaning to try:
Buy a violin from a charity shop.
Give it frets by tying loops of nylon strings round the neck.
Play it stood vertically in my lap, the way they do in southern India.
Result: a bowed string instrument that a clumsy guitarist like me can play.
(Alternatively, I could blow a couple of month's pay on a treble viol. But I'm too poor and too mean.)

i think your first idea has merit, depending on how the strings are tuned.



Lace-Bane
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14 Nov 2020, 2:37 pm

auntblabby wrote:
i tried playing the other day, just a few minutes, and my left hand and wrist were unusably sore for several days afterwards.
maybe you could try to find a flamenco guitar(if not set on classical), and see if they feel more kind inside a shop? they have less sustain, and some buzz is something a tradeoff with the style of music aimed, but the strings are closer to the body, and easier to depress as a result. they are also thinner in design, which might put less strain for angle on your wrist. strings on yours are higher, and the body thicker, for enhanced sustain, to juggle multiple voices as a soloist’s instrument.

only other idea is possibly trying to build up strength with a capo, to relieve tension, and move it back with time toward first position. it’d all be in key of using one though, so it’d be better to find music intended for it.


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auntblabby
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15 Nov 2020, 11:07 am

Lace-Bane wrote:
auntblabby wrote:
i tried playing the other day, just a few minutes, and my left hand and wrist were unusably sore for several days afterwards.
maybe you could try to find a flamenco guitar(if not set on classical), and see if they feel more kind inside a shop? they have less sustain, and some buzz is something a tradeoff with the style of music aimed, but the strings are closer to the body, and easier to depress as a result. they are also thinner in design, which might put less strain for angle on your wrist. strings on yours are higher, and the body thicker, for enhanced sustain, to juggle multiple voices as a soloist’s instrument.

only other idea is possibly trying to build up strength with a capo, to relieve tension, and move it back with time toward first position. it’d all be in key of using one though, so it’d be better to find music intended for it.

mine is a student model classical guitar, i will see about the flamenco style guitar, thank you :)



funeralxempire
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15 Nov 2020, 11:29 am

auntblabby wrote:
Lace-Bane wrote:
auntblabby wrote:
i tried playing the other day, just a few minutes, and my left hand and wrist were unusably sore for several days afterwards.
maybe you could try to find a flamenco guitar(if not set on classical), and see if they feel more kind inside a shop? they have less sustain, and some buzz is something a tradeoff with the style of music aimed, but the strings are closer to the body, and easier to depress as a result. they are also thinner in design, which might put less strain for angle on your wrist. strings on yours are higher, and the body thicker, for enhanced sustain, to juggle multiple voices as a soloist’s instrument.

only other idea is possibly trying to build up strength with a capo, to relieve tension, and move it back with time toward first position. it’d all be in key of using one though, so it’d be better to find music intended for it.

mine is a student model classical guitar, i will see about the flamenco style guitar, thank you :)


Do you play in classical position or the other (normal?) one? That might make a difference too. Whichever one you do, try the other one to see if it places less strain on the wrist of your fretting hand.



auntblabby
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15 Nov 2020, 10:25 pm

classical position. have not tried any other position nor was aware of any other position.



funeralxempire
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16 Nov 2020, 4:42 am

auntblabby wrote:
classical position. have not tried any other position nor was aware of any other position.


You've seen a folk singer before, right? They don't hold it upright like a classical player. That's what I mean.



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16 Nov 2020, 4:54 am

not upright but angled-
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Biscuitman
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20 Nov 2020, 6:20 pm

Been playing for around 23 years, just messing around at home by myself but I can do ok. I mostly play acoustic but I do have a Squire Strat with a couple of pedals that i get out once in a while for some fun.

Also bought a piano recently so learning that. Amazing how having guitar/instrument knowledge makes learning the piano seem pretty straight forward.



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20 Nov 2020, 10:23 pm

Biscuitman wrote:
Been playing for around 23 years, just messing around at home by myself but I can do ok. I mostly play acoustic but I do have a Squire Strat with a couple of pedals that i get out once in a while for some fun.
Also bought a piano recently so learning that. Amazing how having guitar/instrument knowledge makes learning the piano seem pretty straight forward.

i'd like to hear you if you post a youtube sometime. :dj:



funeralxempire
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21 Nov 2020, 4:56 am



So I just bought this for my bass, although it'll be nice for playing Celtic Frost covers on guitar too. :twisted:



holymackerel
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22 Nov 2020, 7:44 am

funeralxempire wrote:


So I just bought this for my bass, although it'll be nice for playing Celtic Frost covers on guitar too. :twisted:


Its heavy. I think it would sound better for playing lead rather than rhythm like that guy was doing though.



Last edited by holymackerel on 22 Nov 2020, 7:56 am, edited 1 time in total.

holymackerel
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22 Nov 2020, 7:52 am

Im using these pedals at the moment. I have a Blackstar HT-5 with some custom cabs where I ripped the old speakers out and fitted in some Celestions. Apart from the HT-5, I am pretty happy with it.

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