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Seanybaby
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20 Jan 2006, 7:19 pm

I'm a people greeter at Wal-Mart, but I really feel like I could do more over there, knowing that mostly elderly people work at that position. The electronic section to be specific. I helped this woman out when she tried to figure out how to operate her Sony Ericsson to transfer her photo over to the photo machine, and she thanked me for it. However apparently the elecs dept is so small and deprived of knowledge they just don't care about me, so they do nothing.

What I think I need to do is work at Radio Shack instead where they really need good techies. :(


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wandrew
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20 Jan 2006, 9:55 pm

I know of two Radio Shacks in California that could really use your services. They're not hiring, but they could really use your services.

Seriously, Radio Shack is to today's hobbyists what Heathkit was in the 1960s. It sounds like you'd be an invaluable resource to them. I'd drop an app at your nearest one, even if they're not hiring, and follow up with a polite query. I'd especially do it if the people there either don't know what they're talking about or try to fob shoddy/overpriced items on you. Good luck!



parts
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07 Feb 2006, 9:10 am

Quote:
I know of two Radio Shacks in California that could really use your services. They're not hiring, but they could really use your services.

Seriously, Radio Shack is to today's hobbyists what Heathkit was in the 1960s. It sounds like you'd be an invaluable resource to them. I'd drop an app at your nearest one, even if they're not hiring, and follow up with a polite query. I'd especially do it if the people there either don't know what they're talking about or try to fob shoddy/overpriced items on you. Good luck!


any Radio Shack remember their slogan "You have question we have answers"
It should be "You have questions we have blank stares" :D



Tekneek
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07 Feb 2006, 4:24 pm

parts wrote:
any Radio Shack remember their slogan "You have question we have answers"
It should be "You have questions we have blank stares" :D


The one near me has tended to be better than others, but I know what you mean!



OTTILY
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14 Feb 2006, 12:21 pm

I'm sorry but aspie and people greeter just don't sound right in the same sentence *chuckles*


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fasteddie
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17 Mar 2006, 12:45 am

There are few jobs I could imagine that would be worse for someone on the autistic spectrum than a Wal-Mart greeter (possibly a few exceptions, in all fairness). But certainly it's not for me. It's demeaning, and spending all day faking friendliness and acting like someone you are not is not a good place for an AS person to be. Not to mention it paying at or near minimum wage, and I have personal opinions about Wal-Mart that would keep me away from it. I will refrain from going into any political discussions.



applesauce
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08 May 2006, 6:50 am

...

Walmart employ people to greet people?

*blinks*

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anandamide
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08 May 2006, 8:54 am

I think that the Walmart greeters are really there as some strategy to try to ensure that people don't shoplift. It's not for customer appreciation, that's for sure, because it's hard to find a staff person on the floor to help shoppers once you pass the door greeter. At least it's better than having some staff person skulking in the aisle watching you from a distance as you shop, that is what some stores have their staff do to deter shoplifting. The "door greeter" is all part of the new corporatized style of customer service.



applesauce
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08 May 2006, 10:09 am

*ponders whether Asda operates the same policy over here...yes, I think maybe they do*

Greeters are the guaranteed way to get me to LEAVE a shop -cannot deal with strange people coming up and talking to me :P But yeah, the toy shop I worked in for like, two weeks had people playing sentry...

But going back on topic...it sounds a sucky job to be stuck doing and a potential aspie nightmare :S Mind you, the more people you meet, the more templates you have for learning social skills and strategies from them...

At least that's what I find working with people!

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Tequila
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08 May 2006, 10:11 am

Greeters in the local Asda tend not to approach people too much. They just stand round in their green uniforms by the doors.



anandamide
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08 May 2006, 5:07 pm

I think it would be much easier for an aspie to be a door greeter in the UK than in North America. In North America you can get fired for not smiling. I know this by experience.



applesauce
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11 May 2006, 8:56 am

Mm. People in UK shops are allowed to be grumpy. We don't subscribe to the 'have a nice day' ethic over here - it seems to be a case of 'we don't care how your day is, we're standing here because we're getting paid to.'

Cynical? Yes...

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anandamide
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11 May 2006, 10:52 am

Haha. Yes I know about this different attitude. When my British granddad came out to visit here in Canada he was a bit offended by the false smiles and the constant obligatory phrase given by store clerks when they said, "THANK YOU AND HAVE A NICE DAY." He walked away from one brightly smiling cashier muttering to himself, "I'll have a bloody nice day if I choose to."


There is a new corporatized type of customer service now. You end up with these huge box stores where no staff give customer service, but the big stores have these few people mandated to smile at the doors. It's really stupid.

Oh well, at least we still get Coronation street on telly.



Tequila
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11 May 2006, 11:33 am

That's the one thing about the UK that very rarely changes: most people are always so bloody miserable! :lol:



Elanivalae
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12 May 2006, 4:15 pm

applesauce wrote:
Mm. People in UK shops are allowed to be grumpy. We don't subscribe to the 'have a nice day' ethic over here - it seems to be a case of 'we don't care how your day is, we're standing here because we're getting paid to.'

Cynical? Yes...

Apple


Sounds like the place I want to be.

Seriously, though, it explains the blank/slightly annoyed stares I get from the British customers we occasionally get, because I'm forced to be all fake cheery and overbearing by my job.