I recently found out I might have Asperger's Syndrome.

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AnonymissMadchen
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24 Aug 2009, 1:05 pm

I just found out very recently, though it isn't a sure thing. It's a good possiblity that I have a mild form, I have not recived and official diagnosis. Is there any advice anyone can offer me? Should I try to get an offical diagnosis? Would it make things easier or harder for me? I'd like to hear what everyone has to say.



Willard
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24 Aug 2009, 1:31 pm

AnonymissMadchen wrote:
I just found out very recently, though it isn't a sure thing. It's a good possiblity that I have a mild form,


Mild. :D Can you say "denial"?

AnonymissMadchen wrote:
Is there any advice anyone can offer me? Should I try to get an offical diagnosis? Would it make things easier or harder for me? I'd like to hear what everyone has to say.


Advice? Study up on it, if it's you, the more you learn about it, the more you'll find yourself saying "Oh my God! - That's me!" and "Wow - I DO do that". And if it is you, the more of those moments you discover, the better you'll feel about yourself as you realize how many of the things that have made you feel different and isolated from your peers all your life aren't unique to you alone. You are not the only representative of your species on this planet. It can be quite a relief to know that.:alien:

As far as official diagnosis - that's something you'll have to decide for yourself. There are Eeyores here who will tell you its a horrible idea, that once you're diagnosed, AUTISTIC will be stamped on your forehead and villagers will chase you with torches and pitchforks - others will tell you what a tremendous weight was lifted from their lives by having that confirmation of who they really are.

And depending on where you live, an official diagnosis may make you eligible for public assistance, as well as protection from discrimination against your disabilities.

Welcome aboard! Enjoy!



Callista
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24 Aug 2009, 1:39 pm

Willard, you don't know if it really is "denial" or if it really is a near-neurotypical case. I know that in many cases, we aren't aware that we are actually more impaired than we think we are. I was such a case myself and it led to years of trying to become employed when I should have asked for help to even make that possible. But it is not at all unknown for someone with AS to have a good perspective enough to correctly place himself on the borderline of diagnosis.

Here is what I suggest: Figure out whether you have any significant impairment. That is the criteria they use deciding whether to diagnose. For example, maybe you have such trouble with socializing that you have no friends despite trying. Maybe you have trouble getting work because you keep clashing with office politics unknowingly, or you're not able to learn the way they want you to learn. Maybe you have special interests that are so obsessive that they take up most of your waking time and don't let you do much else (yes, this is very enjoyable, but it is also a significant trait you will want to note!). Maybe you have trouble reading from anyone, anything but exactly the words they are saying, and this has led to trouble. The important thing is: Has this caused more trouble for you than it would for an average person who is simply socially clumsy, loves a hobby, introverted, etc.? Is there a gap between what people expect of you, and what you can do? If so, you may need help to fill the gap, and should seek diagnosis.


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24 Aug 2009, 1:49 pm

A lot of us are 'mildies', who either didn't have clinical 'impairments', or who figured out 'work-arounds' to seem more NT and cope.

Willard has good advice, as usual.

As you participate in these fora, you'll get a better understanding of your brain wiring, and that will help you accept yourself as aspie, and adapt better to living in an NT world.

Welcome home.


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Willard
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24 Aug 2009, 2:14 pm

Callista wrote:
Willard, you don't know if it really is "denial" or if it really is a near-neurotypical case.


I didn't claim to know anything, I was teasing. Don't take everything so literally.

Oh...sorry. :wink:



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24 Aug 2009, 4:46 pm

Well, I also thought myself as very mild. But I'm beginning to think i might be wrong.
It seems like I'm more "mild to moderate".



Callista
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24 Aug 2009, 5:51 pm

Willard wrote:
Callista wrote:
Willard, you don't know if it really is "denial" or if it really is a near-neurotypical case.


I didn't claim to know anything, I was teasing. Don't take everything so literally.
Oh...sorry. :wink:
Yeeeeah, y'think?


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24 Aug 2009, 6:40 pm

Callista wrote:
Willard wrote:
Callista wrote:
Willard, you don't know if it really is "denial" or if it really is a near-neurotypical case.


I didn't claim to know anything, I was teasing. Don't take everything so literally.
Oh...sorry. :wink:
Yeeeeah, y'think?


Yeah, I was going to say the SAME thing! I guess I should be HAPPY with what willard said. The reactions to it, and even his reaction to his own reaction to our reactions, makes it all the more clear that I have a mild case as well.

By mild, I mean that I even EXCELLED in early milestones. I went to normal schools, and excelled early on. When PUSHED, I even got on the honor roll having one of the highest grades in the school. STILL, that was quite an achievement because I HATED sports, and avoided P.E. like the plague, had hyper/hypo sensitivities, etc... And I had all the social problems, etc... After all, if my symptoms were a bit more mild, I probably wouldn't even care. With improper wording, or not looking at the bad parts, a psychiatrist might say that I don't meet requirement III.



AnonymissMadchen
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25 Aug 2009, 11:17 am

"Advice? Study up on it, if it's you, the more you learn about it, the more you'll find yourself saying "Oh my God! - That's me!" and "Wow - I DO do that". And if it is you, the more of those moments you discover, the better you'll feel about yourself as you realize how many of the things that have made you feel different and isolated from your peers all your life aren't unique to you alone. You are not the only representative of your species on this planet. It can be quite a relief to know that.:alien:"

Yes, I will learn as much about it as I can. I'm sure it will be good do know what I have and what I am like and the reasons for the ways I'm different. Good advice; thank you.

"As far as official diagnosis - that's something you'll have to decide for yourself. There are Eeyores here who will tell you its a horrible idea, that once you're diagnosed, AUTISTIC will be stamped on your forehead and villagers will chase you with torches and pitchforks - others will tell you what a tremendous weight was lifted from their lives by having that confirmation of who they really are."

I'll take both issues into account; there's the possibility of being unelegible for a job becase of being diagnosed, but if it could help emotionally to be diagnosed, than that is good. I'm ptobably going to be cautious until I learn more and I can get a good idea of whether or not I have it myself.


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AnonymissMadchen
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25 Aug 2009, 11:23 am

Callista wrote:
Willard, you don't know if it really is "denial" or if it really is a near-neurotypical case. I know that in many cases, we aren't aware that we are actually more impaired than we think we are. I was such a case myself and it led to years of trying to become employed when I should have asked for help to even make that possible. But it is not at all unknown for someone with AS to have a good perspective enough to correctly place himself on the borderline of diagnosis.

Here is what I suggest: Figure out whether you have any significant impairment. That is the criteria they use deciding whether to diagnose. For example, maybe you have such trouble with socializing that you have no friends despite trying. Maybe you have trouble getting work because you keep clashing with office politics unknowingly, or you're not able to learn the way they want you to learn. Maybe you have special interests that are so obsessive that they take up most of your waking time and don't let you do much else (yes, this is very enjoyable, but it is also a significant trait you will want to note!). Maybe you have trouble reading from anyone, anything but exactly the words they are saying, and this has led to trouble. The important thing is: Has this caused more trouble for you than it would for an average person who is simply socially clumsy, loves a hobby, introverted, etc.? Is there a gap between what people expect of you, and what you can do? If so, you may need help to fill the gap, and should seek diagnosis.


I'll take into account what you said about being more impaired than we think we are when I lean about what I have and about Asperger's Syndrome.

I'll also use your advice about considering what impairments I have. Sometimes I feel shy, but usually I feel better with other people, but it really depends on the situation. Maybe I'm just trying to fit in.


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25 Aug 2009, 11:24 am

AnonymissMadchen wrote:
I'll take both issues into account; there's the possibility of being unelegible for a job becase of being diagnosed, but if it could help emotionally to be diagnosed, than that is good. I'm ptobably going to be cautious until I learn more and I can get a good idea of whether or not I have it myself.

It's usually the jobs with high social demands that wouldn't hire you because of you having AS. These kinds of jobs are not recommended for people with AS, since they can easily backfire on them.

It should also be your choice as to whether you would like to disclose your diagnosis or not.

Either way, I say go for the diagnosis. Some people choose not to be defined by a label, but it's a great way to find out more about yourself and to meet others like you.


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AnonymissMadchen
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25 Aug 2009, 6:44 pm

"It should also be your choice as to whether you would like to disclose your diagnosis or not."

"Either way, I say go for the diagnosis. Some people choose not to be defined by a label, but it's a great way to find out more about yourself and to meet others like you."

I probably won't tell other people that I have been diagnosed, assuming I do get the diagnoses. I don't want other people worrying about me and my condition or thinking I can't do certin things. I might tell my friends since they probably won't think any less of me.


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