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1234
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20 Sep 2009, 9:57 am

I got diagnosed with Asperger's Syndrome.


I really was not expecting to get a diagnosis.
Especially not since I've only had two sessions with this psychologist and when she was looking at the PDD-NOS question form (about my youth), I hadn't checked a lot of the indicators for AS mentioned on there.

I mean, I've seen other psychiatrists, therapists, psychologists etc. for much longer.... and none of them could pinpoint what was wrong with me...
How can this person decide something like that in just two sessions?

And though A LOT makes sense, and a lot fits into the AS 'mould'...

I can't really grasp that I got diagnosed. It must be a mistake. It can't be. I'm ''too normal''.


Is it normal to go into major denial like this?:p


And now that it's there, the label that is... how do I use it? And when?
She told me to at least tell the student counselor at uni and to read one of mr. Attwood's books...
but other than that I'm a bit lost:p (I'm in between psych's now as she's referring me to someone closer to uni).



Aimless
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20 Sep 2009, 10:28 am

OK, you're a veteran so you've been here a while. Were you previously diagnosed with PDD and undergoing a review? I'm just wondering why a longtime member is surprised at the diagnosis. I have no idea whether it's accurate but of course PDD and AS are so close.



1234
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20 Sep 2009, 10:36 am

I'm not a veteran by any means.
I joined near the Summer holidays.

Up until today my profile said that I thought I might have asperger's but that I wasn't sure (big emphasis on the not sure part). I went in for an assessment more so to rule it out, rather than to confirm it.

Thursday was the first time I ever got diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder.
I don't know why she gave me a PDD-NOS question form to fill out.



leejosepho
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20 Sep 2009, 11:04 am

1234 wrote:
I can't really grasp that I got diagnosed. It must be a mistake. It can't be. I'm ''too normal''.

Is it normal to go into major denial like this?


I am presently self-diagnosed, and I plan to go see about an evaluation. However, I tend to think only we folks who actually *do* have problems ever bother to ask *whether* we have them.

Being new to all of this, I really only know very little about any of this. However, I do know it is normal for me to believe I am "normal" like somebody else when I see I also can do something he or she can do. But in reality, my own "normal" does not always include being able to perform someone else's normal quite naturally ... and therein, I believe, lies the challenge of diagnosis and acceptance. It is not natural for me to be normal like somebody else who quite naturally handles our kinds of struggles easily.



1234
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20 Sep 2009, 12:58 pm

I guess in a way that makes sense...


I was just thinking that I'd have to do a ton of tests and that I would have to go in for a lot of sessions with the psychologists to determine whether I'd actually have it or not.

I mean, I'd imagine that finding out whether someone has an autism spectrum disorder or not, is a little more complicated than, for instance, finding out whether someone has the flu or not:P



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20 Sep 2009, 1:08 pm

I was diagnosed in one session; they brought in my mum and asked her a lot of questions about my childhood and that seemed to tick the boxes. If you saw me casually, you probably wouldn't guess I had it at all.

You don't have to do anything with your diagnosis; if you pass as normal, then well done. I've only told a select few about my dx (family members and bf) and plan to tell the college this year (we have a lot of viva exams, which involve social skills, so I figure it may be best to warn them :p).

The only other instance where disclosure might be useful is in a romantic setting; in a relationship that close, your partner's going to see any quirks that others may not, and may leap to the wrong conclusions unless you explain simply what aspergers is, it'll be easier to work out compromises etc..



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20 Sep 2009, 2:59 pm

Its funny how you can go your entire life feeling like you're doing a pretty good job being like everyone else, most of the time. Okay, maybe you're not exactly like most of the people around you, but you're not abnormal or anything.

Then one day you get diagnosed with AS - even though you kinda had a feeling you might have it, ever since you first read about what it was - somebody who ought to know what they're talking about officially confirms it. STAMP.

Then, as it starts to sink in over the next few weeks, you begin to flash back on things that have happened to you over the years...and gradually you begin to realize...you were never quite as normal as you thought you were...and EVERYBODY ALWAYS KNEW IT BUT YOU.

All these years, people were looking at each other behind your back and rolling their eyes. No one could quite put their finger on it, but they all knew there was something "special" about you. Too smart to be retarded, too odd to be just a regular person. But something was always just a tad 'off'. And you thought you were just a little quirky.

Then you begin to realize just how much energy you've been spending for years on end to try to pretend to be 'one of them'. Damn - no wonder you have such a constantly elevated anxiety level - it's all that mental energy you're burning trying to keep the mask from slipping. You're eternally onstage playing a part that isn't you. Its exhausting. You'll be astounded at how liberated you'll feel once you let that go.

At least, that's been my experience. :duh:



1234
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21 Sep 2009, 2:53 pm

Lene wrote:
I was diagnosed in one session; they brought in my mum and asked her a lot of questions about my childhood and that seemed to tick the boxes. If you saw me casually, you probably wouldn't guess I had it at all.

You don't have to do anything with your diagnosis; if you pass as normal, then well done. I've only told a select few about my dx (family members and bf) and plan to tell the college this year (we have a lot of viva exams, which involve social skills, so I figure it may be best to warn them :p).

The only other instance where disclosure might be useful is in a romantic setting; in a relationship that close, your partner's going to see any quirks that others may not, and may leap to the wrong conclusions unless you explain simply what aspergers is, it'll be easier to work out compromises etc..



I suppose contacting school would be a good idea.

I feel so lost right now and my head is REALLY busy.
On top of that I have the flu and a pile of reading and homework to catch up to:\
I have to write a summar for a grade. And I'm supposed to review someone else's as well (we have this rule where you review someone's homework before they send it to the teacher).
I haven't even read the chapters for it.

But I can't concentrate on much else other than my diagnosis at the moment.
Sigh.

I hate how, during moments like this, time doesn't stop so you can catch your breath.



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21 Sep 2009, 3:17 pm

1234 wrote:
Lene wrote:
I was diagnosed in one session; they brought in my mum and asked her a lot of questions about my childhood and that seemed to tick the boxes. If you saw me casually, you probably wouldn't guess I had it at all.

You don't have to do anything with your diagnosis; if you pass as normal, then well done. I've only told a select few about my dx (family members and bf) and plan to tell the college this year (we have a lot of viva exams, which involve social skills, so I figure it may be best to warn them :p).

The only other instance where disclosure might be useful is in a romantic setting; in a relationship that close, your partner's going to see any quirks that others may not, and may leap to the wrong conclusions unless you explain simply what aspergers is, it'll be easier to work out compromises etc..



I suppose contacting school would be a good idea.

I feel so lost right now and my head is REALLY busy.
On top of that I have the flu and a pile of reading and homework to catch up to:\
I have to write a summar for a grade. And I'm supposed to review someone else's as well (we have this rule where you review someone's homework before they send it to the teacher).
I haven't even read the chapters for it.

But I can't concentrate on much else other than my diagnosis at the moment.
Sigh.

I hate how, during moments like this, time doesn't stop so you can catch your breath.


Make a list of stuff to think about so you don’t have to think about it all at the same time. :D



1234
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21 Sep 2009, 3:40 pm

I've tried but the thoughts about the diagnosis (and with it my entire life and future) are too dominant.
On top of that I can't stop thinking about knitting/wool either >_<

And I have a feeling my brain is about to enterbreak down city.


I suppose I could at least e-mail my professor and explain to her why my homework won't be stellar as I hand it in.
Not that she'll care or whatever. But still.



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21 Sep 2009, 7:57 pm

Willard wrote:
Its funny how you can go your entire life feeling like you're doing a pretty good job being like everyone else, most of the time. Okay, maybe you're not exactly like most of the people around you, but you're not abnormal or anything.

Then one day you get diagnosed with AS - even though you kinda had a feeling you might have it, ever since you first read about what it was - somebody who ought to know what they're talking about officially confirms it. STAMP.

Then, as it starts to sink in over the next few weeks, you begin to flash back on things that have happened to you over the years...and gradually you begin to realize...you were never quite as normal as you thought you were...and EVERYBODY ALWAYS KNEW IT BUT YOU.

All these years, people were looking at each other behind your back and rolling their eyes. No one could quite put their finger on it, but they all knew there was something "special" about you. Too smart to be retarded, too odd to be just a regular person. But something was always just a tad 'off'. And you thought you were just a little quirky.

Then you begin to realize just how much energy you've been spending for years on end to try to pretend to be 'one of them'. Damn - no wonder you have such a constantly elevated anxiety level - it's all that mental energy you're burning trying to keep the mask from slipping. You're eternally onstage playing a part that isn't you. Its exhausting. You'll be astounded at how liberated you'll feel once you let that go.

At least, that's been my experience. :duh:


Wow.

That's summed my experiences after my diagnosis down to a T. I could have written that, but not as eloquently.


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