Need some help with Social Story about listening to teachers

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katherinenick
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27 Sep 2009, 6:10 am

Hi,

I was wondering if anyone could help me with a simple social story for my son in preschool. He is having a hard time listening to teachers and then wondering why everyone gets very serious. He gets upset when he is removed from class. I think a simple story might explain things better for him. Also a social story for what to do when he arrives at school (take off backpack hang it up, jacket, hang it up, etc; ) Is there a website or maybe some guidelines you follow to make a story. Thanks for any help!


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Katherine


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27 Sep 2009, 10:13 am

Generally most social stories are just an explanation of what is expected, why, and what the outcome is. For example:

When we go to school in the morning, we arrive with our jackets and back packs on. The jackets keep us warm, and our back packs carry our things. When school starts, we need to put these items in their place so that we dont lose them. First we take off our back packs and hang them up. Next we take of our jackets and hang them up. Then we can join the class and the teacher will be happy. Later, when it is time to leave school, we can pick up our jackets and back packs from where we left them.

I am afraid I dont have any experience writing social stories, but most of them go along that theme.



DenvrDave
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27 Sep 2009, 12:08 pm

Another thing you might try is a role-playing game, where you practice different scenarios with your child. For instance, on saturday or sunday, have your child get ready for school, have them enter a room and pretend its the school classroom, and you play the role of teacher, then walk through the "first thing in the morning" routine. Then switch roles, you play the role of student and have your child play the role of teacher...this can add a tremendous element of fun to the process. Some advantages are that: (1) quality time with your child; (2) by repeating the routine as a game, you start to establish a real routine, which routines can be hugely important in school. I've used this technique with more or less success depending the complexity of the routine and the maturity of my son, as a simple example its great for teaching how to answer the telephone. Hope this helps, best of luck.



Chizpurfle52595
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27 Sep 2009, 2:43 pm

Could you be a little bit more specific about what behavior of his triggers the teacher's reactions?