Page 1 of 2 [ 25 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next

InaNagini
Emu Egg
Emu Egg

User avatar

Joined: 5 Nov 2009
Gender: Female
Posts: 5

06 Nov 2009, 8:54 am

I can't be the only one, can I? :)

If you're a buddhist, which branch do you follow or are you influenced by all kinds of buddhism traditions?
I know to little about buddhism to exclude anything at this moment.

Do you practise it in your daily life? How?
I strive to both begin and end my day with meditation.

Have you ever gone on a retreat?
I'm planning to go on a one-month retreat to a zen centre when I finish school in spring.



ruveyn
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 21 Sep 2008
Age: 83
Gender: Male
Posts: 31,502
Location: New Jersey

06 Nov 2009, 9:58 am

InaNagini wrote:
I can't be the only one, can I? :)

If you're a buddhist, which branch do you follow or are you influenced by all kinds of buddhism traditions?
I know to little about buddhism to exclude anything at this moment.

Do you practise it in your daily life? How?
I strive to both begin and end my day with meditation.

Have you ever gone on a retreat?
I'm planning to go on a one-month retreat to a zen centre when I finish school in spring.



Ummmmmmmmmmm...... let's see.

ruveyn



gina-ghettoprincess
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 8 Nov 2008
Age: 25
Gender: Female
Posts: 2,669
Location: The Town That Time Forgot (UK)

06 Nov 2009, 10:59 am

I used to be a Buddhist. I am now 'officially' an atheist but I still follow most of the Buddhist teachings.

I like Buddhism because it's peaceful and non-judgmental, for the most part.


_________________
'El reloj, no avanza
y yo quiero ir a verte,
La clase, no acaba
y es como un semestre"


TallyMan
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 30 Mar 2008
Gender: Male
Posts: 40,061

06 Nov 2009, 1:13 pm

There are two or three people on WP that I know of with Buddhist leanings. I'm one of them.
I would not describe myself as a "follower" of Buddhism though but the teachings of Zen match closely my own inclinations so I seem to be on a parallel course. I'm also attracted by Advaita Vedanta which again has strong parallels with Buddhism.

I discovered a book about Buddhism thirty years ago and was shocked... I could almost have written the book myself it so closely reflected my own thoughts! I became a monk for just over a year in between going to university etc.

Regarding meditation I practice what is called "Shikantaza" meditation which comes very natural to me. It is a form of "open" meditation. Instead of the more common forms of meditation which focus attention to a point or on a word or breathing, Shikantaza is more an opening up and a natural stilling of mental noise and allowing perception / consciousness to go where it will. Difficult to describe but very profound. It has no target or goal. Instead it is more about opening up to see "what is"; becoming an observer or witness of mental activity at deeper levels where the very notion of an "I" or individuality loses meaning and is lost.


_________________
I've left WP indefinitely.


Acacia
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 12 Dec 2008
Age: 38
Gender: Male
Posts: 1,986

06 Nov 2009, 2:36 pm

TallyMan wrote:
I'm also attracted by Advaita Vedanta which again has strong parallels with Buddhism.
Indeed it does :wink:

Raised Catholic, I became disaffected with Christianity during my teenage years. I also gravitated naturally towards Buddhism, as it was one of the only spiritual disciplines I knew about that seemed to explain how I already felt about religion and spirituality. For all of its revelation and insight, somehow Buddhism just didn't completely fit. After some years of aimlessness, I got more deeply into Hinduism and discovered Advaita Vedanta... Specifically the teachings of Sri Ramakrishna and Swami Vivekananda. Now there's no doubt left in my mind. Not a speck.

Non-dualism.


_________________
Plantae/Magnoliophyta/Magnoliopsida/Fabales/Fabaceae/Mimosoideae/Acacia


TallyMan
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 30 Mar 2008
Gender: Male
Posts: 40,061

06 Nov 2009, 2:58 pm

Acacia wrote:
I got more deeply into Hinduism and discovered Advaita Vedanta... Specifically the teachings of Sri Ramakrishna and Swami Vivekananda. Now there's no doubt left in my mind. Not a speck.

Non-dualism.


I have read a great deal written by Swami Vivekananda and much about Ramakrishna and his life. It was many years ago. Ramakrishna used to say the core problem was "Women and gold"; but I felt that was too simplistic he also promoted bhakti yoga. Personally I'm Jnana ... not this, not this. I find the idea of devotion to a concept of God totally alien to me. (I've just reached out and pulled a book of my shelf "Jnana Yoga by Vivekeananda" - Its been thirty years since I last read it!)

Did you ever read the "Drg Drsa Viveka" - Enquiry into the nature of the seer and the seen? It is an ancient Hindu text. Very enlightening, so to speak.

Since then I found the teachings of Ramana Maharshi more in line with my inclinations than Ramakrishna.

A few years ago the teachings of Jiddu Krishnamurti had a profound effect on me. He too was strongly Buddhist / Advaita but he denied this as he denied all labels, urging people to look for themselves and reject all organised religion and belief systems.

More recently I've read books by Tony Parsons and he is strongly advaita vedanta - totally none dualist.

Of all the teachers and teachings I'd say that Krishnamurti and Tony Parsons are the most important I've ever come across. They help dismantle the belief systems that we have built up from the moment of birth and help us to look with our own eyes, deeply and profoundly.


_________________
I've left WP indefinitely.


TallyMan
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 30 Mar 2008
Gender: Male
Posts: 40,061

06 Nov 2009, 3:07 pm

InaNagini wrote:
Have you ever gone on a retreat?
I'm planning to go on a one-month retreat to a zen centre when I finish school in spring.


One thing to be aware of... after your retreat there is a possibility that you may want to stay - for good! As I did. :lol: much to the horror of my parents.


_________________
I've left WP indefinitely.


FeralAspie
Blue Jay
Blue Jay

User avatar

Joined: 3 Apr 2009
Age: 51
Gender: Male
Posts: 80
Location: Australia

06 Nov 2009, 6:07 pm

TallyMan, I would be interested in your thoughts as about the writings of Alan Watts. Thanks.



makuranososhi
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 12 May 2008
Age: 43
Gender: Male
Posts: 5,805
Location: Banned by Alex

06 Nov 2009, 9:17 pm

I tend to lean towards philosophic Taoism over others, though there is certain appreciation for many of the principles.


M.


_________________
My thanks to all the wonderful members here; I will miss the opportunity to continue to learn and work with you.

For those who seek an alternative, it is coming.

So long, and thanks for all the fish!


TallyMan
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 30 Mar 2008
Gender: Male
Posts: 40,061

07 Nov 2009, 6:00 am

FeralAspie wrote:
TallyMan, I would be interested in your thoughts as about the writings of Alan Watts. Thanks.


Strangely I've never read any of his books. I've come across his name numerous times over the years and read quotes by him in various books by other authors. However, I'm not that familiar with his teachings so I can't really comment. Is he someone you would recommend reading, and if so a book in particular?


_________________
I've left WP indefinitely.


FeralAspie
Blue Jay
Blue Jay

User avatar

Joined: 3 Apr 2009
Age: 51
Gender: Male
Posts: 80
Location: Australia

07 Nov 2009, 5:48 pm

TallyMan wrote:
Is he someone you would recommend reading, and if so a book in particular?


I would strongly recommend reading him. There are so many great books, but to pick one to generally recommend I would suggest 'The Book on the Taboo Against Knowing Who You Are'.



Acacia
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 12 Dec 2008
Age: 38
Gender: Male
Posts: 1,986

08 Nov 2009, 4:44 am

FeralAspie wrote:
I would strongly recommend reading him.

Second.

Alan Watts also thankfully gave hours upon hours of lectures on spirituality and philosophy that were recorded and preserved both in audio and video.

Here's one:

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=clxHk9aZyqA[/youtube]


_________________
Plantae/Magnoliophyta/Magnoliopsida/Fabales/Fabaceae/Mimosoideae/Acacia


TallyMan
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 30 Mar 2008
Gender: Male
Posts: 40,061

08 Nov 2009, 5:44 am

Acacia wrote:
FeralAspie wrote:
Alan Watts also thankfully gave hours upon hours of lectures on spirituality and philosophy that were recorded and preserved both in audio and video.


Alas I only have dial-up internet access here in the middle of rural France so downloading videos is a non-starter for me. However, I'll have a look to see if there are any mp3 audio lectures anywhere ... I leave the computer downloading overnight if there is anything large to download.

Edit: Google shows a number of free mp3's so I'll queue some up to download.


_________________
I've left WP indefinitely.


Dancyclancy
Deinonychus
Deinonychus

User avatar

Joined: 2 Sep 2009
Age: 72
Gender: Female
Posts: 365
Location: Australia

08 Nov 2009, 7:53 am

Like others on this thread I've had a lifetime of exploring religious philospohies from the East.

Was brought up Irish Catholic ( RC but with a very srong Irish twist here in OZ).

Krishnamurti..... very influential in promoting actual Self Questioning.

Read Alan Watts, Christmas Humphries and Suzuki about 30-40 yrs ago.


Tibetan Buddhism from 70's onwards..... retreats Lam Rim and others , Abydharma ( series of lectures on Buddhist psychology, Goenka ( Burmese Buddhist retreat ... Vispassna)

A lot of reading, Buddhist Summer schools ( various lineages of Tibetan, Thai, Indian, Vietnamese , Japanese Etc..... teachers)

Mind & its Potential Conference.... ( multi faith, multi disciplinary... psych, medicine, sociology, journalism, science etc Cf Happiness conference.

All in all Now do not consider myself to BE anything in particular.... not into institutionalised anything..or rituals.....

Still open to explore various writers.... Hillman, Moore, Vedas Upanishads etc.. also Bible, Koran etc...

A matter of understanding and bringing together the similarities in a non devisive manner.

I read according as to where I feel I'm at within myself.. Western psych, phil, science also.

Meditation.... used to meditate regularly in a formal way......
Now use the breath and release of "controlled consciousness ( don't know a better way to describe it) ... to BE and allow for space from input.

Needed to find my own way with the what resonated from the various EXPERIENCED teachings. Word in capitals... to indicate self examination/ confrontation... not merely intellectual gymnastics or ritual.... can be a harrowing , but nevertheless for me a , rewarding path, that hopefully will forever twist and turn bringing new insights.



TallyMan
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 30 Mar 2008
Gender: Male
Posts: 40,061

08 Nov 2009, 8:22 am

Dancyclancy wrote:
Needed to find my own way with the what resonated from the various EXPERIENCED teachings. Word in capitals... to indicate self examination/ confrontation... not merely intellectual gymnastics or ritual.... can be a harrowing , but nevertheless for me a , rewarding path, that hopefully will forever twist and turn bringing new insights.


I agree about the EXPERIENCED part and also that walking alone can be harrowing. I've been walking alone since childhood asking questions that others didn't ask. It is too easy to follow the herd and swallow a pile of steaming beliefs without deeply questioning them. I think a lot of people do that just to fit in and and feel part of something, it also gives them a sense of purpose in life. To walk alone can be very difficult at times but is also very rewarding and opens up insights that others seldom encounter. You sound somewhat like me in several ways. :)


_________________
I've left WP indefinitely.


Woodfish
Deinonychus
Deinonychus

User avatar

Joined: 22 Aug 2009
Age: 58
Gender: Male
Posts: 382
Location: alternating between Lothlórien and Rivendell

08 Nov 2009, 8:02 pm

I seem to like most of the traditions I've come across. Not least Christianity. I feel Jung is very important to me, also in this context. Helping me understanding better how to use and benefit from the different methods, guides ... Putting it all in perspective.


_________________
If we concentrate on accepting ourselves, change will happen. It will take care of itself. Self-acceptance is so hard to get you can't do it a day at a time. I've found that I need to run my life five minutes at a time. --Jess Lair