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Michaels
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03 Mar 2010, 8:27 pm

I often do, though I'm still sexually attracted to girls.



Aurore
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03 Mar 2010, 8:33 pm

I'm exactly the opposite way around.


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?Evil? No. Cursed?! No. COATED IN CHOCOLATE?! Perhaps. At one time. But NO LONGER.?


Moog
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03 Mar 2010, 8:45 pm

I've always been slightly androgynous, both in look and behaviour. I'm male by the way.



nara44
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03 Mar 2010, 10:48 pm

Moog wrote:
I've always been slightly androgynous, both in look and behaviour. I'm male by the way.


Many AS,including me,doesn't fit the stereotypical gender behaviors and perceptions so from an NT point of view we might appear to be androgynous
From a macho point of view a geek might appear to be sexless but as time goes by many females start to realize that the geeky could be much more of a man than the average macho

the same is true of an AS who might appear to be androgynous from a shallow stereotypical point of view but because he can get both sexes point of view simultaneously he can be the best partner for the other sex in many aspects
in my experience this can work only if your partner is an AS like u and is equipped to get and respond to the way u feel sex and other gender related issues
(as Aurore wrote many AS females feels like a man so they can connect with males feeling like female in way which is much deeper and truer to love than the usual tired game of the sexes )
it is also much more creative to be androgynous as u get to combine,link or solve many seemingly contradictory facets and elements of life,



Moog
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04 Mar 2010, 8:16 am

Good post, Nara. I agree that it can be interesting and useful, having the yin and yang somewhat more balanced within us.



aziraphale
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04 Mar 2010, 4:46 pm

I'm the other way around. I'm a female-to-male transsexual and I am nearly exclusively attracted to guys. I was born a biological female but I always have been a boy in my head and I'm working on getting my body to fit better. I still act kind of effeminate and obviously gay though, but I don't think that makes me any less of a man. You should come to Laura's Playground. It's for transgender people. I think you could get some support there. Being transgender is really difficult and most of us need help to keep going.



Kilroy
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04 Mar 2010, 5:57 pm

a little
though the part thing is right
I was born in the right body



Michaels
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04 Mar 2010, 6:26 pm

I was born in the correct body, but often feel like a girl inside. It's not a transgender thing.



AutismMerch
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04 Mar 2010, 7:01 pm

It's common for folks on the spectrum to feel like the other gender from time to time, so you're not alone, and like you say it's not always a transgender thing. Society has defined what is an "ideal man" and an "ideal woman" in very narrow terms. The consequence of this for Aspie men and women is that, due to their aspie traits, they may not feel like they resemble the dominate gender norms/ideals. Male culture values sporting interest and ability, female culture values socialness and communication skills. Many aspie males aren't interested in sports or have good motor skills, and many aspie females will not have the same level of social skills as other girls. So some aspies may not "feel" like their gender or "feel" more like the other gender. The problem is that society defines men and women in narrow terms that do not reflect the real life experience of many people.