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ruveyn
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03 Jun 2010, 8:20 pm

Here is a historical list of oil spills and well blow outs.

http://www.infoplease.com/ipa/A0001451.html

You will notice that the world has not come to and end nor has life on earth been extinguished.

In 1979 the Ixtoc well blew out in the Gulf of Mexico. The news stories and the commentaries were almost identical to what we have been hearing in the last month. It was a nasty leak and economic damage did occur, but sea life in the Gulf wasn't wiped out, the fishing industry survived and most of us lived to see another day.

ruveyn



Master_Pedant
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03 Jun 2010, 8:41 pm

The difference you failed to mention being, of course, that massive amounts of harmful dispersants were not injected into the 1979 spill and that the oil floated to the top of the water quicker in the Gulf of Mexico spill (thereby more easily consumed by microbes).

Quote:
That's in part because the size of an oil spill doesn't necessarily determine its impact.

...

It's also closer to U.S. Gulf coast shores. It took the Ixtoc spill took nearly two months to reach the Texas coast. By then, the oil had turned mostly into a thick black tar.

...

There is greater concern with the Deepwater Horizon because of the proximity to Louisiana's fragile coastline.

The marshes are critical for productive fisheries. To protect the shoreline, the U.S. Coast Guard and the oil giant BP, which leased the sunken rig, have mobilized skimmer vessels and planes and put thousands of feet of containment boom in place.


http://www.chron.com/disp/story.mpl/bus ... 76966.html



skafather84
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03 Jun 2010, 9:17 pm

The marshes/wetlands are much more critical than just to fishing. It's also key to preventing coastal erosion and loss of land (literally).


Image




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This is no joke. When I talk about losing my home, I'm very literal about it. This is a serious f*****g problem beyond simply the fishing economy or the petrol economy.

This means a much faster loss of land.


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Jaythefordman
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03 Jun 2010, 11:02 pm

The misinformation and emotives surrounding this astounds me, but I should not be surprised.

Yes, it is very correct to recognise that an oil spill is not the end of the earth, nor does it cause everlasting damage. Numerous natural leakages are found worldwide, and do no harm, so it will follow that man-made spills will have the same impact. For sure it looks messy, and upsets the greenies, but nature has its mechanisms to deak with it very effectively. bacteria love oil, and between them and the natural elements they very quickly break the oil down and allow it to be absorbed into the world.

A little recognised fact is that some years after the Exxon Valdez disaster we now see the area richer in life than it was before, this is due to Crude influence. The crude spill was particularly messy then because of the low temperatures, but time now tells. The mexican gulf has an advantage in that it is signifcantly warmer.

Not saying we should not prevent or do something about them, or that they doen't cause immediate harm, but on the long run its no big deal.

As for the dispersants, they are formulated to be environmentaly friendly, and break down quickly. Primary purpoesse is the aid in the rapid breakdown of the oil and minimise its agglomeration which creates all the mess we get so upset about. it will not prevent micobes from attacking the oil.

I know this as both a Chemist in the oil industry, and also one who has been inolved in the study of oil breadown in nature and its mechanisms.



Awesomelyglorious
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03 Jun 2010, 11:08 pm

ruveyn wrote:
You will notice that the world has not come to and end nor has life on earth been extinguished.

ruveyn

I disagree.



petitesouris
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03 Jun 2010, 11:58 pm

even if the effects of the oil spill eventually become less severe in the years to come, the point is that such a catastrophe never had to happen and could have possibly been prevented. the oil rig was not inspected by engineers before it was used and the dead man switch did not work, possibly due to the fact that one of its batteries was dead. even when the oil becomes dispersed after a long time, permanent damage will already have been inflicted.



ruveyn
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04 Jun 2010, 3:07 am

petitesouris wrote:
even if the effects of the oil spill eventually become less severe in the years to come, the point is that such a catastrophe never had to happen and could have possibly been prevented. the oil rig was not inspected by engineers before it was used and the dead man switch did not work, possibly due to the fact that one of its batteries was dead. even when the oil becomes dispersed after a long time, permanent damage will already have been inflicted.


If we had gone over to nuclear fission generated heat thirty or forty years go we would not have to drill for oil in an ocean environment which can be damage (in the short run) by well blowout and other oil leaks. We also would not be compelled to commit our military resources in the middle east. We could let the folks in the middle east rot, just like we let the folks in Africa rot.

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Let him starve to death, and you don't even have to think about him.



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04 Jun 2010, 3:38 am

I just learned today someone suggested we explode a nuclear device in the Gulf in order to seal the leak. As one of Kieth Olbermann's guests tonight (himself an actual scientist) said, with hurricane season coming up, you could expect radioactive globs of oil being hurled inland into the Gulf States if this hair brained stunt were ever carried out!

-Bill, otherwise known as Kraichgauer



petitesouris
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04 Jun 2010, 8:41 am

who suggested that? how would that ever be effective?



skafather84
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04 Jun 2010, 10:09 am

Jaythefordman wrote:
The misinformation and emotives surrounding this astounds me, but I should not be surprised.

Yes, it is very correct to recognise that an oil spill is not the end of the earth, nor does it cause everlasting damage. Numerous natural leakages are found worldwide, and do no harm, so it will follow that man-made spills will have the same impact. For sure it looks messy, and upsets the greenies, but nature has its mechanisms to deak with it very effectively. bacteria love oil, and between them and the natural elements they very quickly break the oil down and allow it to be absorbed into the world.

A little recognised fact is that some years after the Exxon Valdez disaster we now see the area richer in life than it was before, this is due to Crude influence. The crude spill was particularly messy then because of the low temperatures, but time now tells. The mexican gulf has an advantage in that it is signifcantly warmer.

Not saying we should not prevent or do something about them, or that they doen't cause immediate harm, but on the long run its no big deal.

As for the dispersants, they are formulated to be environmentaly friendly, and break down quickly. Primary purpoesse is the aid in the rapid breakdown of the oil and minimise its agglomeration which creates all the mess we get so upset about. it will not prevent micobes from attacking the oil.

I know this as both a Chemist in the oil industry, and also one who has been inolved in the study of oil breadown in nature and its mechanisms.


The dispersants they're currently using AREN'T environmentally friendly and has, in fact, been banned in other countries just for that reason.

Also, the time for regrowth is decades and decades is not time that we have to wait for things to grow back. The loss of wetlands means a speeding up of the coastal erosion problem and that will never come back because the land is lost to sea.


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skafather84
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04 Jun 2010, 10:13 am

Kraichgauer wrote:
I just learned today someone suggested we explode a nuclear device in the Gulf in order to seal the leak. As one of Kieth Olbermann's guests tonight (himself an actual scientist) said, with hurricane season coming up, you could expect radioactive globs of oil being hurled inland into the Gulf States if this hair brained stunt were ever carried out!

-Bill, otherwise known as Kraichgauer


Yeah, I'm absolutely opposed to using nuclear devices to try and seal this. The depths are causing enough problems for other devices...who's to say that the depths won't cause a premature detonation that'll leave radioactive waste in the gulf AND never get to actually seal the well shut?

It's bad enough that there's threat of hurricanes shoving all this mess moreso into the wetlands and up river and into the lakes (there's been reports that it's reached Lake Borgne).


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richardbenson
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05 Jun 2010, 2:55 pm

i cant wait for some wackjob preacher to say that god is once again punishing the southeast because of sin. does anyone remember some religious fanatic saying that god sent the hurricane katrina because of off the casinos in mississippi? :lol:


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