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Decepticon
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21 Jun 2010, 10:27 am

are wonderful people aren't they?



Last edited by Decepticon on 23 Jun 2010, 2:19 am, edited 1 time in total.

wblastyn
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21 Jun 2010, 10:43 am

Hmm, I don't know, people who usually want to get rid of what they call "political correctness" usually want to do so, so that they can be as racist/homophobic/etc as they like without consequences.



Decepticon
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21 Jun 2010, 11:08 am

8O



Last edited by Decepticon on 23 Jun 2010, 2:19 am, edited 1 time in total.

MotownDangerPants
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21 Jun 2010, 11:17 am

It is what it is. NTs have problems too, it isn't like Aspies are the only outcasts on the planet. I can understand where you're coming from, but they are 99% of the population. I don't really understand the complaints I see here, I mean I feel the same way sometimes but I just keep my mouth shut, it's basically what I would do anyway. If someone was harrasisng me it'd be another story, luckily I blend in well as long as I'm quiet.

lol.



book_noodles
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21 Jun 2010, 11:38 am

There are etiquette books.. I've read them when I was 8 or 9 when it became evident that I needed some help.. Now they say I'm too formal. You can't win :lol: don't bother asking for their rule book; the expectations will change shortly and your manners and social carriage will become outdated.
Maybe they are hourly emails?


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Kiley
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21 Jun 2010, 11:47 am

The are Aspies making rules as well. Usually it's more of a socio-economic thing, not a neurostatus thing. Aspies who are good at their jobs can be in positions of authority and end up making rules.

I think it's best if the rule makers are people who are concerned about others and open to a wide variety of people, and sometimes that happens...but not always. I don't think there is a particular neurostatus that makes one a good or bad rule maker.



antique_toy
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21 Jun 2010, 12:51 pm

you make it sound like we're somehow oppressed by neurotypicals because we don't understand their social rules.



Willard
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21 Jun 2010, 12:55 pm

antique_toy wrote:
you make it sound like we're somehow oppressed by neurotypicals because we don't understand their social rules.



:lmao: You make it sound like we're not.


Kiley wrote:
The are Aspies making rules as well. Usually it's more of a socio-economic thing, not a neurostatus thing. Aspies who are good at their jobs can be in positions of authority and end up making rules.


Name one.



Pistonhead
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21 Jun 2010, 12:59 pm

I don't buy that we are helpless like it sounds like everyone is saying. I dealt with being "oppressed" for years. I then began to sink morally and have come to the point where "I won't be the victim but the first to cast a stone".



Janissy
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21 Jun 2010, 1:33 pm

Willard wrote:
Kiley wrote:
]The are Aspies making rules as well. Usually it's more of a socio-economic thing, not a neurostatus thing. Aspies who are good at their jobs can be in positions of authority and end up making rules.


Name one.


Alex: He made the rules for this site. All who post on this site, including my NT self, must adhere to those rules or be banned.



Decepticon
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21 Jun 2010, 1:34 pm

:cry:



Last edited by Decepticon on 23 Jun 2010, 2:20 am, edited 1 time in total.

marshall
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21 Jun 2010, 1:35 pm

I don't see it as oppression either. At least not deliberate. Neurotypicals are wired to pick up on social conventions and follow them. Aspies are too, just not to the same degree. If there were no rules or social conventions the world would be chaos.

Good, empathetic, NT individuals will tend to be on "our" side. NT institutions and culture can be "against" us in a lot of ways but that doesn't make all individuals involved "bad" or "oppressive". I just think modern society is very impersonal and doesn't take individual needs/differences into account. Unfortunately things don't change until individuals start making a lot of noise.



azurecrayon
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21 Jun 2010, 2:22 pm

what is this mythical "NT" everyone talks about? i think a lot of people actually mean non-asd when they say nt.

statistics show in the US in any given year about 26% of adults suffer from a diagnosable mental disorder. that means 1 out of every 4 people you run across are not nt. that doesnt even touch the geeks, nerds, and little-bit-freaky people that arent diagnosable because they dont meet all the criteria.

i think the vast majority of people have something freaky going on. maybe not diagnosable, maybe it only touches one aspect of their life or personality. but can they truly be called nt? i see nt as referring to society as a whole, rather than to individual people. typical simply means within the range of an accepted norm. so while the majority of people may think neurotypically about various things, it doesnt mean the majority of people are neurotypical.

for instance, take 4 people who by majority think dogs bark, cows moo, grass is green, and the sky is blue. one of them, lets call him bob, thinks the sky is red while the rest think its blue. bill on the other hand thinks cows quack. fred is sure that dogs meow. and martha is boring and has no original thought. the sky is blue by neurotypical standards as thats how most perceive it, dogs bark, cows moo, and grass is green. so while we can say those are neurotypical thinking patterns because thats how the majority perceive things, the majority of people, 3 out of the 4, were not neurotypical individually.

at least thats how my accusedly nt, self diagnosed ocpd, socially dysfunctional but not asd brain sees things.



Decepticon
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21 Jun 2010, 2:30 pm

:oops:



Last edited by Decepticon on 23 Jun 2010, 2:20 am, edited 1 time in total.

marshall
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21 Jun 2010, 3:51 pm

Decepticon wrote:
marshall wrote:
If there were no rules or social conventions the world would be chaos.


My view is that the world would be better served if people couple express their words freely. Not actions but words. Will it hurt the world to be able to talk - have a conversation? Many a problem would be solved if only people would be permitted to speak. We could be an honest peoples. But isn't that the point...the world is not honest. We live under an umbrella of lies do we not? This makes the problem compounded for the Aspie. We must learn to lie as a social norm.

Nevertheless, I'm sure there are valid points on all sides and this is merely my opinion. Things are complicated, I know.


Maybe I'm half NT. I appreciate honesty more than most people but I don't think I would be comfortable living in a world where everyone continuously told everyone else exactly what they were thinking 24/7. Sometimes it's nice not to know what some people really think. It's nice to know what a small circle of close friends or relatives really think, but for the rest of the world... hell no. I really don't need to be constantly reminded of how stupid, ignorant, prejudiced people are. They're bad enough to deal with as it is.



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21 Jun 2010, 3:56 pm

History repeats itself...

I have nothing against NTs. Maybe it's because I've been friends with NTs who accept me, the way that I am, today. Just me. Shelby Anne Munro aka Mick Avory. 8)


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