Whats the difference between Autism and AS?

Page 1 of 2 [ 22 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next

Corp900
Sea Gull
Sea Gull

User avatar

Joined: 22 Jul 2010
Age: 31
Gender: Male
Posts: 248

19 Sep 2010, 11:07 pm

forreal



Surfman
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 1 Aug 2010
Age: 56
Gender: Male
Posts: 3,938
Location: Homeward bound

19 Sep 2010, 11:16 pm

foreskin



buryuntime
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 6 Dec 2008
Age: 81
Gender: Female
Posts: 3,662

19 Sep 2010, 11:17 pm

Please use the Search function.



one-A-N
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 2 Mar 2010
Age: 65
Gender: Male
Posts: 902
Location: Sydney

19 Sep 2010, 11:25 pm

My understanding of the differences:

1. language delay : autism has language delay, AS has no language delay.

2. IQ: people with AS must have average or above average IQ, while people with autism can have any IQ. Autistic people with average or above average IQ may be described as having "high functioning autism" (HFA).

So the only difference between AS and HFA is language delay. This often sorts itself out by a certain age (I think about 10 years old), so for teenagers and adults on the spectrum, there is no observable difference between AS and HFA.

There is a spectrum between LFA and HFA/AS ... and it is impossible to draw a strict dividing line. People with AS - while having no language delay - may have language peculiarities.



DandelionFireworks
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 16 May 2010
Gender: Female
Posts: 2,011

19 Sep 2010, 11:55 pm

Actually, it's possible to be diagnosed with autism without a language delay, by the DSM-IV criteria (thought not really likely by common practice).


_________________
I'm using a non-verbal right now. I wish you could see it. --dyingofpoetry

NOT A DOCTOR


MindBlind
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 1 May 2009
Age: 28
Gender: Female
Posts: 1,351

20 Sep 2010, 3:41 am

There's no difference. AS and HFA are one in the same. You can make up differences between the two (such as speech delay, IQ, etc) but it's all about semantics, really. At the end of the day, AS, PDD-NOS and Autism are being put into a single diagnostic category anyway. If we are comparing AS with a classical autism, the only difference is severity, really. I hope that answers your question.



one-A-N
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 2 Mar 2010
Age: 65
Gender: Male
Posts: 902
Location: Sydney

20 Sep 2010, 4:52 am

DandelionFireworks wrote:
Actually, it's possible to be diagnosed with autism without a language delay, by the DSM-IV criteria (thought not really likely by common practice).


You are quite right. Language delay OR below-average IQ will get you an autism diagnosis, if you have sufficient other autistic characteristics to qualify for one of the two conditions. So some people with autism did not experience language delay, they just had a below-average IQ.



sartresue
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 18 Dec 2007
Age: 65
Gender: Female
Posts: 6,766
Location: The Castle of Shock and Awe-tism

20 Sep 2010, 2:05 pm

Corp900 wrote:
forreal


Not forreal topic

Next.


_________________
Radiant Aspergian
Awe-Tistic Whirlwind

Phuture Phounder of the Philosophy Phactory

NOT a believer of Mystic Woo-Woo


Jono
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 10 Jul 2008
Age: 38
Gender: Male
Posts: 5,465
Location: Johannesburg, South Africa

20 Sep 2010, 2:20 pm

The difference between AS and HFA is language delay, however that distinction doesn't always seem to be clear and could be considered a bit arbitrary. There are some people who have been diagnosed with AS but might have been diagnosed with HFA by different professional and visa versa. That's why they're removing the AS as separate diagnosis from autism in the DSM V.



gramirez
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 9 Nov 2008
Age: 25
Gender: Male
Posts: 1,880
Location: Barrington, Illinois

20 Sep 2010, 4:21 pm

Autism = Language delay
AS = No language delay.

That's the only diff.


_________________
Reality is a nice place but I wouldn't want to live there


TPE2
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 20 Oct 2008
Gender: Male
Posts: 1,546

20 Sep 2010, 4:49 pm

one-A-N wrote:
DandelionFireworks wrote:
Actually, it's possible to be diagnosed with autism without a language delay, by the DSM-IV criteria (thought not really likely by common practice).


You are quite right. Language delay OR below-average IQ will get you an autism diagnosis, if you have sufficient other autistic characteristics to qualify for one of the two conditions. So some people with autism did not experience language delay, they just had a below-average IQ.


No - the diagnosis of Autism does not have nothing to do with IQ. If you have enough symptoms (6 in 12, I think), you have Autism, even if you begin to talk with 6 months old and have a IQ of 140.

Quote:
(I) A total of six (or more) items from (A), (B), and (C), with at least two from (A), and one each from (B) and (C)

(A) qualitative impairment in social interaction, as manifested by at least two of the following:

1. marked impairments in the use of multiple nonverbal behaviors such as eye-to-eye gaze, facial expression, body posture, and gestures to regulate social interaction
2. failure to develop peer relationships appropriate to developmental level
3. a lack of spontaneous seeking to share enjoyment, interests, or achievements with other people, (e.g., by a lack of showing, bringing, or pointing out objects of interest to other people)
4. lack of social or emotional reciprocity ( note: in the description, it gives the following as examples: not actively participating in simple social play or games, preferring solitary activities, or involving others in activities only as tools or "mechanical" aids )

(B) qualitative impairments in communication as manifested by at least one of the following:

1. delay in, or total lack of, the development of spoken language (not accompanied by an attempt to compensate through alternative modes of communication such as gesture or mime)
2. in individuals with adequate speech, marked impairment in the ability to initiate or sustain a conversation with others
3. stereotyped and repetitive use of language or idiosyncratic language
4. lack of varied, spontaneous make-believe play or social imitative play appropriate to developmental level

(C) restricted repetitive and stereotyped patterns of behavior, interests and activities, as manifested by at least two of the following:

1. encompassing preoccupation with one or more stereotyped and restricted patterns of interest that is abnormal either in intensity or focus
2. apparently inflexible adherence to specific, nonfunctional routines or rituals
3. stereotyped and repetitive motor mannerisms (e.g hand or finger flapping or twisting, or complex whole-body movements)
4. persistent preoccupation with parts of objects

(II) Delays or abnormal functioning in at least one of the following areas, with onset prior to age 3 years:

(A) social interaction
(B) language as used in social communication
(C) symbolic or imaginative play

(III) The disturbance is not better accounted for by Rett's Disorder or Childhood Disintegrative Disorder



Callista
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 3 Feb 2006
Age: 36
Gender: Female
Posts: 11,395
Location: Ohio, USA

20 Sep 2010, 5:05 pm

Yeah, check that third criterion. That's a statement of what takes precedence over what else when you qualify to be diagnosed with both things. So, III says that if you can also be diagnosed with either Rett's or CDD, you get that diagnosis instead of the Autistic Disorder one. Asperger's has a similar criterion that says that if you meet criteria for Autistic Disorder, then you can't be diagnosed with Asperger's too.

The order of precedence is:
Rett's
CDD
Autistic Disorder
Asperger's Disorder
PDD-NOS

So the first one on the top of that list that you qualify for is the diagnosis you get. Which means that plenty (probably most) of Asperger's cases are actually misdiagnosed Autistic Disorder cases--if you fit criteria for both, or if you ever had a speech delay, or if you ever had developmental delay or adpative skills problems, you aren't supposed to be diagnosed Asperger's at all. Like most people diagnosed with Asperger's, I fit into that category--as a child, I should have been diagnosed with Autistic Disorder. Around the age of nine, when I lost the last of the Category B criteria (in my case, that would have been learning to conduct a back-and-forth conversation), I should have been re-diagnosed as PDD-NOS because, despite fitting Asperger's criteria very well, I still had adaptive skills delays that disqualify me from being diagnosed with Asperger's.

But my official diagnosis is Asperger's, not PDD-NOS, and since it gets me what I need, I'm content.


_________________
Reports from a Resident Alien:
http://chaoticidealism.livejournal.com

Autism Memorial:
http://autism-memorial.livejournal.com


sandra3
Deinonychus
Deinonychus

User avatar

Joined: 31 Oct 2005
Gender: Female
Posts: 370
Location: california

20 Sep 2010, 5:27 pm

They're both the same it all depends on the level of functioning and how bad it is otherwise there is no real difference. Autism is autism.



Sydney
Raven
Raven

User avatar

Joined: 2 Nov 2008
Age: 34
Gender: Female
Posts: 115

20 Sep 2010, 6:58 pm

I was diangoesed with autism. I do not think I am very difernt from people diagnosed with asperger. I have been on this site. I have been rading it. I have been joinig in. I think the difference is dificulat to decide.



MXH
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 28 Jul 2010
Age: 28
Gender: Male
Posts: 13,072
Location: Here i stand and face the rain

20 Sep 2010, 7:22 pm

I had the oposite of a language delay. I learned both english and spanish at the same time.