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Solvejg
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09 Apr 2011, 5:47 am

I have 2 children and I am also AS myself. My nearly 4 yr old son is HFA/LFA borderline. My daughter has always been normal with quirks (I am not sure AS or copying behaviors). Well I take my son to lots of therapists ect to help him. I want him to be ok within himself in the long term. His speech and his Occupational therapist has suggested that my daughter is brighter then anyone thay have seen at her age.

She is 2 but was 3 months early. She is talking full sentences, can recognise all the differant plane companies from the ground eg "Look Qantas plane" or "Look Rex plane" ect. She has always been very bright but she is going beyond that now. Yetserday at childcare she was asked "and you are?" She responded with "DNA" 8O :?

Apparently they are slipping her in the room with the 4yr olds because she has language too advanced for the toddler room. They have only told me because she is past the kindy kids. She knows all shapes including 3D objects up to dodecahedron. She is reading simple words like cat, dog, mummy ect and can say "that number is 1, 2, 3 it is higher ther 9, 8" she cant count past 10 but obviously knows the principle.


Where do i go from here? 8O


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Solvejg
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09 Apr 2011, 7:04 am

I love how nobody ever responds to me. I am not even mainstream enough for the AS/ASD community. :(






I suck. :(


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Georgia
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09 Apr 2011, 7:09 am

WOW! 8O

I'd say just to feed her mind. Every child is a "sponge" and the more things that she experiences, the bigger that brain will grow :D I think the trick is to always be aware of her emotional maturity. She will always still be her chronological age in that regard.

My oldest who is now almost 13, was/is "scary smart." She knew the order of the planets at 6yo. Could also remember the names of the dinosaurs (even the ones that "didn't exist" when I was her age) and which came first: the Jurrasic or the Cretaceous period. She was not reading fluently yet; she just remembered things after we read books to her. She's a math whiz, and has the vocabulary of a college student according to her SLP from grade school.

You might consider homeschool for a few years. We homeschooled our daughter until she was 9, when the social parts of school started to become more important to her. I think she would have been bored by the typical curriculum until then. We would make weekly trips to the library so that she could answer her own questions. It was/is amazing!

Good luck :D

PS Some books about smart girls and women would also be good, as being a smart female isn't always appreciated as we get older. Matilda by Roald Dahl comes to mind.


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Georgia
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09 Apr 2011, 7:10 am

Solvejg wrote:
I love how nobody ever responds to me. I am not even mainstream enough for the AS/ASD community. :(






I suck. :(


No you don't! I'm just a slow typist :)


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Solvejg
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09 Apr 2011, 7:17 am

Georgia wrote:
WOW! 8O

I'd say just to feed her mind. Every child is a "sponge" and the more things that she experiences, the bigger that brain will grow :D I think the trick is to always be aware of her emotional maturity. She will always still be her chronological age in that regard.

My oldest who is now almost 13, was/is "scary smart." She knew the order of the planets at 6yo. Could also remember the names of the dinosaurs (even the ones that "didn't exist" when I was her age) and which came first: the Jurrasic or the Cretaceous period. She was not reading fluently yet; she just remembered things after we read books to her. She's a math whiz, and has the vocabulary of a college student according to her SLP from grade school.

You might consider homeschool for a few years. We homeschooled our daughter until she was 9, when the social parts of school started to become more important to her. I think she would have been bored by the typical curriculum until then. We would make weekly trips to the library so that she could answer her own questions. It was/is amazing!

Good luck :D

PS Some books about smart girls and women would also be good, as being a smart female isn't always appreciated as we get older. Matilda by Roald Dahl comes to mind.


She knows that stuff already. She has nearly 30 dinosaurs under her belt already. AT JUST 2!! !
. My dd can spell and w
I wish i could home-school but finances prohibit that due to falling though cracks. (Screw the system and then some). I am screwed quite frankly. I looked at Steiner school ( no Montessori near me) and they said no because my son (and probably my daughter) is asd.


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BurntOutMom
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09 Apr 2011, 12:07 pm

Solvejg wrote:
wish i could home-school but finances prohibit that due to falling though cracks. (Screw the system and then some). I am screwed quite frankly. I looked at Steiner school ( no Montessori near me) and they said no because my son (and probably my daughter) is asd.


Geez, Can they do that? That seems like blatant discrimination. Bastards.

I normally wouldn't give my opinion or thoughts on this because I've never dealt with a kid so super, freaky smart. Does she just seem to soak up anything or does it tend to be special interest areas?

I guess there are only two things I can suggest. However you decide to educate her, don't force but make sure she always has access to the things that intellectually stimulate her. And don't forget to remind her that no matter how smart she is, she's allowed to just be a kid and enjoy her childhood.

Sorry, I don't have my first cup of coffee in yet, so not necessarily eloquent yet... Have you seen the Lilly videos on YouTube? Amazing... but most important... she's having fun. I would just keep that in mind.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r43yCiKlbCo[/youtube]



DW_a_mom
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09 Apr 2011, 3:46 pm

Solvejg wrote:
I love how nobody ever responds to me. I am not even mainstream enough for the AS/ASD community. :(






I suck. :(


Um, no, but you do post in the middle of my night.

Remember that most of our posters won't answer until they feel they have something useful to say. Sometimes they have to think about it. And, also, they can only answer if you are posting when they are on the computer. Give each post at least 24 hours before feeling you haven't been answered. It is totally normal for responses to take that long.


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DW_a_mom
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09 Apr 2011, 3:49 pm

Solvejg wrote:
She is 2 but was 3 months early. She is talking full sentences, can recognise all the differant plane companies from the ground eg "Look Qantas plane" or "Look Rex plane" ect. She has always been very bright but she is going beyond that now. Yetserday at childcare she was asked "and you are?" She responded with "DNA" 8O :?

---


Where do i go from here? 8O


Lol, I love that answer, DNA!

As for where to go from here ... follow her lead. If she shows interest in something, take it seriously, and see what you can do to build from it. At her age learning shouldn't be structured, it should be fun and interesting. So, follow her lead.

IMHO, of course.


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psychohist
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09 Apr 2011, 6:03 pm

Solvejg wrote:
Where do i go from here? 8O

I would say, keep advancing her to where she fits in intellectually. You don't want to hold her back and bore her into giving up on learning!

I would not worry about "social issues", especially if there's a good chance she'll be aspie. Socialization in large groups of strictly uniform age is not what we're evolved for anyway, and it's not how real life works once one gets out of school. Spend time with her outside of school and take her along when you do social things, and she'll learn all the social skills she'll need.



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09 Apr 2011, 10:30 pm

I did a google for gifted testing with your country at the end. There are quite a few options on where to go. Top link looks good. There are also a few lists. I'm surprised at the Steiner, seems illegal to me as well. I'd take that as a plus though, that system is a bit full on and cultish imho.



Solvejg
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09 Apr 2011, 11:32 pm

ominous wrote:
I did a google for gifted testing with your country at the end. There are quite a few options on where to go. Top link looks good. There are also a few lists. I'm surprised at the Steiner, seems illegal to me as well. I'd take that as a plus though, that system is a bit full on and cultish imho.


There is only 1 steiner here within a 2 hour drive and it is private. I live next to the city centre too. IT SUCKS! I have already looked at the gifted testing. 2 of the options on the list are where my son goes already for therapy and they are the ones who brought it up....

Can't i have one normal child. LOL. Or maybe it would be good if i lived somewhere except here. lol.

Oh yes she told me this morning. "poo comes from my gut." Yes it does.


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ominous
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09 Apr 2011, 11:37 pm

Yeah we seem a lot backarsewards unless you're in the top two not-backarsewards cities in this country. :roll:



Solvejg
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10 Apr 2011, 12:17 am

Even P has a lot more services then A. :roll:


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ominous
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10 Apr 2011, 12:20 am

Yeah, it looks that way. Of course whether or not someone can access those services remains to be seen. When I was considering moving to M I reminded myself that a lot of what looks "great" to folks who might check out our services cannot be accessed for a variety of little reasons (not intellectually disabled, not in school, not enrolled in this community group, etc.). I figure it would be similar here. We have a Steiner up the road from me. I've never been a big fan of Steiner. We have a lot of Montessori schools though.



Solvejg
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10 Apr 2011, 12:24 am

We don't. We have a Montessori but they are booked out since birth. Unless you fit their philosophy pre pregnancy, you have little to no hope of getting in. The childcare centre at modbury Montessori has a 10 year waiting list!

The whole system is F*****


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I love diggin' in the dirt
With just a pick and brush
Finding fossils is my aim
So I'm never in a rush