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The-Raven
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17 Jul 2011, 3:16 am

Ive lived in the midlands for the last 2 years having moved here to be near my bf, the relationship has finished now so i want to move back to the south coast of england, where my family lives and have a fresh start.

When I moved in the past it has been very upsetting and traumatic and so i would like advice or tips on anyway to make it more aspie friendly and less stressful, I have 2 kids on the spectrum as well so any advice on how to make the move better for them would be very welcome. They are looking forward to moving as they want to live near to my family and they are not happy in school here but it will still be stressful for them.

so any advice welcome :sunny:



sacrip
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17 Jul 2011, 10:38 am

Lists. Lots and lots of lists.

The stress of moving involves a lot of, "OK, what now?" questions. Since it's not something we do every day, moving a household ends up with a lot of thinking on your feet, literally. And that's not one of our strengths.

So, to the best of your ability, plan the day in advance with a checklist of everything that needs to be done, who is responsible for doing it, the things they need to get it done and when, generally, it needs to be done by. When you got a house half packed up, half unpacked, and everybody coming to you to see what to do next, chaos will reign if you let it. If you have a general guideline to gauge your progress, you'll have an easier time.


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straightfairy
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20 Jul 2011, 4:12 am

sacrip wrote:
Lists. Lots and lots of lists.

The stress of moving involves a lot of, "OK, what now?" questions. Since it's not something we do every day, moving a household ends up with a lot of thinking on your feet, literally. And that's not one of our strengths.

So, to the best of your ability, plan the day in advance with a checklist of everything that needs to be done, who is responsible for doing it, the things they need to get it done and when, generally, it needs to be done by. When you got a house half packed up, half unpacked, and everybody coming to you to see what to do next, chaos will reign if you let it. If you have a general guideline to gauge your progress, you'll have an easier time.


This ^^^. I couldn't put it better myself.