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SadAspy
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12 Aug 2011, 10:29 pm

They gave me a week (I really don't blame them....I'm lucky they gave me this long). I don't have a job, though I do have assets. Anyone have any ideas besides sleeping in my car?



Jory
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12 Aug 2011, 10:35 pm

No. :( One of my worries is the fact that I don't know what the hell I would do if my parents did the same, and the possibility that they might.



Fnord
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12 Aug 2011, 10:39 pm

How old are you, SadAspy?


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SadAspy
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12 Aug 2011, 10:43 pm

Quote:
How old are you, SadAspy?


28 miserable years.

Yeah, I know I shouldn't be living at home, but I have no job, and I was rejected for SSDI earlier this month.



brolife
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12 Aug 2011, 10:56 pm

Seeing that its a back against the wall situation, just get a minimum wage paying job and find people who you can rent an apartment with. You don't have to be friends with your roommates, you just have to get along.



League_Girl
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12 Aug 2011, 11:18 pm

Why are they kicking you out?

I can't imagine that happening to me.



Fnord
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12 Aug 2011, 11:27 pm

SadAspy wrote:
Fnord wrote:
How old are you, SadAspy?

28 miserable years.

I think you've answered my question and League_Girl's at the same time.
SadAspy wrote:
Yeah, I know I shouldn't be living at home, but I have no job, and I was rejected for SSDI earlier this month.

Yes, you should be living at home - your home, not theirs. Parents usually kick their kids out of their house when (1) the parents believe that the kids need only the incentive to finish growing up; (2) the parents believe that their children are fully capable of making it on their own; (3) the kids have become too much of a financial burden to support on the parents' limited or dwindling income.

You are still not too old for military service, unless of course you are officially and legally recognized as physically disabled or Non-Compos Mentis, in which case you may be able to sue your parents for support.


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“I must acknowledge, once and for all, that the
purpose of diplomacy is to prolong a crisis.”

— Leonard Nimoy as Mr. Spock, in the Star Trek
episode "The Mark of Gideon" (ep. 3.16, 1969)


ValentineWiggin
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13 Aug 2011, 12:11 am

brolife wrote:
Seeing that its a back against the wall situation, just get a minimum wage paying job and find people who you can rent an apartment with. You don't have to be friends with your roommates, you just have to get along.


Constant face to face interaction with the public, loud and constant noise...
I lasted three months in a min. wage job, in retail.
And that was because I tried to kill myself and the 'rents made me quit.

"Just" getting a job which would be cake for (some) NT's presents a bit of a challenge for ASers.

I would suggest "gigs", OP. I got paid $200 once for three hours of organizing an older woman's garage while she talked to me about her late husband, and what a "looker" he was, and she sent me home with a pie and some vintage artwork to boot. Newspaper ads, baby!


You could come live with me, if you can tolerate someone with light sensitivity and can get along with Mr. Cat. :D






















I'm serious, I have a spare room that needs letting. 8O
My parents own the house, but they'd likely be tickled pink just to have someone here to mow the yard.


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League_Girl
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13 Aug 2011, 12:26 am

Fnord wrote:
SadAspy wrote:
Fnord wrote:
How old are you, SadAspy?

28 miserable years.

I think you've answered my question and League_Girl's at the same time.
SadAspy wrote:
Yeah, I know I shouldn't be living at home, but I have no job, and I was rejected for SSDI earlier this month.

Yes, you should be living at home - your home, not theirs. Parents usually kick their kids out of their house when (1) the parents believe that the kids need only the incentive to finish growing up; (2) the parents believe that their children are fully capable of making it on their own; (3) the kids have become too much of a financial burden to support on the parents' limited or dwindling income.

You are still not too old for military service, unless of course you are officially and legally recognized as physically disabled or Non-Compos Mentis, in which case you may be able to sue your parents for support.



I don't think that should apply to people with disabilities who can't make it on their own or who have a hard time moving forward on their own.

Aspies normally have a hard time getting their lives together as an adult and need more help. If my mother all of a sudden kicked me out as an adult and I was on SSI and hardly had a job despite that I was looking for one but couldn't get one, I don't know what would have happened to me. Instead they helped me. Aspies even usually have a hard time getting a job.

If they want to kick them out, that is what group homes are for and parents do usually put their adult kids there who are disabled.



ooOoOoOAnaOoOoOoo
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13 Aug 2011, 12:31 am

SadAspy wrote:
They gave me a week (I really don't blame them....I'm lucky they gave me this long). I don't have a job, though I do have assets. Anyone have any ideas besides sleeping in my car?

If you do nice things for them and don't give them anything to complain about maybe they will forget you are living there or won't mind if you stay longer. Try to be inconspicuous.



Fnord
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13 Aug 2011, 12:40 am

League_Girl wrote:
I don't think that should apply to people with disabilities who can't make it on their own or who have a hard time moving forward on their own.

Aspies normally have a hard time getting their lives together as an adult and need more help. If my mother all of a sudden kicked me out as an adult and I was on SSI and hardly had a job despite that I was looking for one but couldn't get one, I don't know what would have happened to me. Instead they helped me. Aspies even usually have a hard time getting a job.

If they want to kick them out, that is what group homes are for and parents do usually put their adult kids there who are disabled.

You're right, of course; on all counts. SadAspy's parents should at least offer to ease the transition, maybe by providing the first month's rent or seeking his placement in a group home. If he is disabled, then maybe he qualifies for accelerated placement.

But if he is not disabled, then there is still the military; and if he has a four-year degree from an accredited university, he could leave boot camp as an officer candidate - four to six years from now, he could come back as a Lieutenant, and show his parents what they tossed out with the bathwater.


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“I must acknowledge, once and for all, that the
purpose of diplomacy is to prolong a crisis.”

— Leonard Nimoy as Mr. Spock, in the Star Trek
episode "The Mark of Gideon" (ep. 3.16, 1969)


ValentineWiggin
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13 Aug 2011, 12:40 am

League_Girl wrote:
Fnord wrote:
SadAspy wrote:
Fnord wrote:
How old are you, SadAspy?

28 miserable years.

I think you've answered my question and League_Girl's at the same time.
SadAspy wrote:
Yeah, I know I shouldn't be living at home, but I have no job, and I was rejected for SSDI earlier this month.

Yes, you should be living at home - your home, not theirs. Parents usually kick their kids out of their house when (1) the parents believe that the kids need only the incentive to finish growing up; (2) the parents believe that their children are fully capable of making it on their own; (3) the kids have become too much of a financial burden to support on the parents' limited or dwindling income.

You are still not too old for military service, unless of course you are officially and legally recognized as physically disabled or Non-Compos Mentis, in which case you may be able to sue your parents for support.



I don't think that should apply to people with disabilities who can't make it on their own or who have a hard time moving forward on their own.

Aspies normally have a hard time getting their lives together as an adult and need more help. If my mother all of a sudden kicked me out as an adult and I was on SSI and hardly had a job despite that I was looking for one but couldn't get one, I don't know what would have happened to me. Instead they helped me. Aspies even usually have a hard time getting a job.

If they want to kick them out, that is what group homes are for and parents do usually put their adult kids there who are disabled.


This, +....

there are NT's.
With Master's.
From big universities.
Who are living with their parents.
Through no fault or deficit of their own.

In many places, there are quite simply no jobs to be had.


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of the human Heart, that very few Men, who have no Property, have any Judgment of their own.
They talk and vote as they are directed by Some Man of Property, who has attached their Minds
to his Interest."


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13 Aug 2011, 12:47 am

Are you able to live on your own?

Do you have the money for a down payment on an apartment?

Will your parents help you find an apartment?

Yes, you'll have to start looking for a job, but I guess you've probably been looking for one for a while and not gotten one, if you were desperate enough to try applying for SSI.

If you can't pay for an apartment, you'll have to apply at a homeless shelter. You'll want to get on whatever waiting lists they have. Thankfully, it's summer, and that means the hardcore homeless (i.e., long-term people who've given up on getting permanent housing in the forseeable future) will tend to be sleeping outdoors; so the waiting lists will be shorter. If you do this, ask to see a social worker. You want to find a job and a place to stay; a social worker can often help with this.


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13 Aug 2011, 1:05 am

Fnord wrote:
League_Girl wrote:
I don't think that should apply to people with disabilities who can't make it on their own or who have a hard time moving forward on their own.

Aspies normally have a hard time getting their lives together as an adult and need more help. If my mother all of a sudden kicked me out as an adult and I was on SSI and hardly had a job despite that I was looking for one but couldn't get one, I don't know what would have happened to me. Instead they helped me. Aspies even usually have a hard time getting a job.

If they want to kick them out, that is what group homes are for and parents do usually put their adult kids there who are disabled.

You're right, of course; on all counts. SadAspy's parents should at least offer to ease the transition, maybe by providing the first month's rent or seeking his placement in a group home. If he is disabled, then maybe he qualifies for accelerated placement.

But if he is not disabled, then there is still the military; and if he has a four-year degree from an accredited university, he could leave boot camp as an officer candidate - four to six years from now, he could come back as a Lieutenant, and show his parents what they tossed out with the bathwater.



The problem is, you need to be perfect to join, no mental health problems, no medical problems, no disabilities, nothing. I used to get calls all the time to join until I mentioned I was on medication and then I was told I didn't qualify. I never got another phone call again. I didn't want to join anyway. My brother was ejected because of his health problems and my husband was ejected because of his disabilities. It wasn't really the military, it was the navy or something or the air force he tried joining.

It's possible to still join if you don't have a official diagnoses. They have no way of knowing when they approve you.



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13 Aug 2011, 1:06 am

There are some factors to consider relating to your assets. You have a car for transportation which is good. Hopefully it's reliable.

Do you have much money saved up? Also where do you live? Maybe to find work you need to move if you can afford to.

Also do you have any particular skills or training?

I'm not sure what if any job experience you have to put on an application. The limited job advice I can think of is to get a commercial license C or maybe B. I don't think a class C is that expensive and you might be able to get into some driving jobs. If you are really looking to avoid Teams and working with People quite a few driving jobs are solitary.