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CeciliaAnn
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06 Sep 2011, 5:41 pm

I have heard this work wonders in small children, especially those with full-blown autism. However, can this work for an Asperger's adult? Is it worth making so many sacrifices, to the palate and financially?


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06 Sep 2011, 5:52 pm

I'm just doing dairy-free, but it's made a world of difference for me. I used to have terrible stomach and skin problems all the time, but those have all cleared up. I guess it depends on what you're expecting it to do for you. I just generally feel a lot better now that I don't feel physically ill all the time. Now that I'm not as self-conscious about my skin (the scarring is still clearing up, but you wouldn't notice it if you weren't looking for it) I'm more likely to hang out with my friends or go swimming or whatever, I feel more confident. I'm hoping it will help prevent the "change of season" allergies that seem to be cropping up with everyone else right now as well.



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06 Sep 2011, 6:57 pm

Special diets are inconclusive for autism unless the kid has a diagnosable digestive tract disorder or allergy that makes them not feel good. The kids I've worked with that have been on a special diet are usually taken off of it by their parents due to lack of results.


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06 Sep 2011, 7:22 pm

I went GF/CF just to see if it would help me feel better physically, and it absolutely did. I was undiagnosed celiac, and my doctor never thought to test for it. After being off gluten for a while, I was able to start eating dairy again. I don't seem to have any intolerance to dairy specifically, but apparently gluten intolerance can cause dairy intolerance. Both made me sick when I was eating gluten.

I'd suggest being tested for gluten intolerance if you can. Then you would know whether it would help you without having to try it out first. If you are gluten intolerant, that doesn't necessarily mean you have to buy the expensive gluten-free foods. There are plenty of naturally gluten-free foods out there. I'm not a fan of "substitute" foods myself, even aside from the cost, so I avoid them.

If you are not gluten or dairy intolerant, there's no evidence that the diet will do you any good at all.



CeciliaAnn
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06 Sep 2011, 9:40 pm

f**k it, then. I was a vegan for three years, have no intolerances to either. I will continue to enjoy my milk and wheat, as I please!


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Mackica
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07 Sep 2011, 10:41 pm

I've had a lot of an easier time gluten and dairy free.I don't think it's eccentric;if anything,it's a lot more health and nutrient conscious.



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08 Sep 2011, 12:01 am

my brother is currently trying to be gluten free for 7 months, and he was dairy free for some time but now he's on the organic unpasturized cows milk trend and we'll be making the 12 hour drive down to northern California for unpasturized milk (guess you can't buy any straight from the farmer unless you own the cow via a co-op or something.)

I think I don't have the will to go completely gluten free, and my brother says that if you don't go all in, it's a waste of money. So I think I'll try the dairy free diet, while limiting my gluten intake a bit.


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Nadir
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09 Sep 2011, 1:48 am

If you avoid Gluten in ceratin foods something you obtain is a decrease in weight gaining. Gluten is a combination of protein and carbohydrate, a complex molecule, hard to digest. I am sure in some biochemistry book this is better explained...



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09 Sep 2011, 3:46 am

I am lactose intolerant, which doesn't work to my advantage as if hugely reinforces the entire "nerd" label. If I consume lactose, I break out in hives, which is horrid, although, I am able to consume small amounts of lactose and experience only slightly irritated skin.


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09 Sep 2011, 9:11 am

Eating diary and gluten free has made a difference for me. I'm pretty good about avoiding wheat, and other grains, but every once in awhile will eat some dairy, cheese in particular. And then for the next couple days wonder why as I feel awful and have difficulty concentrating fully.

A newer sight about the health difficulties wheat can cause some that I've enjoyed learning from has been:

http://www.wheatbellyblog.com/



KathySilverstein
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24 Sep 2011, 1:36 am

Well, it works for some people, but not all. It's highly individual. I used to have a lot of stomach problems that I almost never have anymore after going gluten/dairy free. But it didn't happen right away, it took several months. I can't say for sure this is what is causing the improvement, but it's an easy diet for me,so why not.


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24 Sep 2011, 3:06 pm

CeciliaAnn wrote:
I have heard this work wonders in small children, especially those with full-blown autism. However, can this work for an Asperger's adult? Is it worth making so many sacrifices, to the palate and financially?


If you test postive for lactose intolerance and gluten intolerance (or Celiac) than it'll work. I'm not diary free, I've been on a gluten free diet for years due to Celiac Disorder. It certainly improved my growth.

Otherwise, it probably won't prove wonders.


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EmiliaL
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24 Sep 2011, 4:04 pm

It may work if what you're reactive to is dairy and or wheat.

If your intolerances are something else, such as another food group, it won't do anything for you.

Other common culprits are non-food items, such as dyes, preservatives, MSG, and yeah, even trans fats for some people.

True, dairy and wheat are the most obvious food allergies, probably because someone developed a test for those.

But you can have inappropriate reactions to anything made of...matter. I seem to have been the poster child for that. :roll:

Seeing an allergist (M.D.) is of limited usefulness. They test for perhaps a few components of dairy, like casein or some other protein. But if it's the fat that sends you, the doc will say you don't have a problem.

Plus, M.D.s assume the only allergic response is an Ig response, though this is beginning to shift...finally. Well, there's more to allergies than histamine responses, sorry. All the Benedryl in the world wouldn't do a thing for my allergies, but a 4-day migraine and blood pressure on the verge of a stroke is pretty hard to miss.

I do naturopathic counseling for people who have food allergies in particular. If someone wants to try the elimination diet routine, it has the advantage of being free at least. I usually have people get off all dairy, wheat, trans fats, and chemicals as much as possible. Then we see what happens and work from there.

Yes, I have had clients (and so has the person that's done my allergy treatments) that have had all sorts of symptoms go away after the allergies were discovered and managed. Symptoms are everything from "Restless Leg Syndrome" to meltdowns to brain fog to panic attacks to seizures to common bipolar symptoms. So yes food allergies might be a cause of some of that.

I would caution anyone with aspies or autism though, it's just ONE thing to look at. There seems to be much much more to aspies and autism, and the idea that health conditions only ever spring from one thing is not correct.

If your insurance makes it worth your while and you want to look for food allergies, there's certainly no harm in going to an allergist. But if that hasn't cleared up what's going on, see if you can find an applied kinesiologist -- their testing is non-invasive and far more complete when you're trying to track down what's bothering you.

Also, it's possible now to have those inappropriate reactions, not just to foods, but pollen, pets, and various chemicals either removed entirely or, at least beaten down to a level that is tolerable, provided you can get to a location in the U.S., Canada, or Australia.

I know it works, because both my daughter and I used to be able to eat nothing but organic red meat, some brands of brown rice, and a few organic root veggies and fruits. Now we can eat anything, provided it's honest food.

My most obvious allergies were dairy and corn. But today I ate Mexican and I'm fine. Two years ago if I'd just walked into the restaurant, I'd have been on my way to the ER in less than 10 minutes.

Oh yes, and I used to have Chronic Fatigue Syndrome/fibro. Now, I don't.

That's how I went into naturopathy. I had to find my own cures, and ended up learning so much I finally got formal about the education part and set up shop. I doubt I'll be going back to a chemistry lab anytime soon.



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25 Sep 2011, 12:50 am

I've been considering going gluten-free due to a problem unrelated to Aspergers.
I've been dairy-free for 5 years (vegan).
Still reading up on the various products containing gluten.


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02 Oct 2011, 11:48 pm

I've just gone Gluten Free in one of the best places to go Gluten Free: Portland, Oregon

there's too many amazing options. My shopping so far is like 150 a week, and thats largely making sure I have enough gluten-free basics like bread, cereal, milk, granola, and microwavable food that I can quickly prep at work. I also spend another 50 bucks eating out every week, usually for dinner so... I'm almost at 200 dollars a week. I'm going to try and get that down to just 150 a week, but I'm only 2 weeks into the diet and the initial costs are always more expensive as you cover basics by buying the basics.

I need good cheap recipes for this diet. Usually my pre-breakfast breakfast before I work out an hour or two at the gym early in the mourning is a Smoothie, Fiber Bar, and cereal, followed by Bio K, Eggs, Gluten-free Waffles and Oatmeal when I get home before I head off to work. I usually have a Banana, Nut, and Honey on Gluten-Free Bread on my first break, and a microwaveable meal for lunch. A few hours after lunch, I'll enjoy a home-made fruit-n-yogurt parfait, and I'm working at my second job or pulling a double at my first, I'll probably have another microwaveable dinner on hand, and for dinner,I usually eat out. It all adds up! I usually burn off the calories so I'm not watching that.

For those who follow a GF diet, what does your diet consist of and how do you make it work? Plus... any recommendation on GF Pastas? I bought some rice-based ones from Trader Joes (where I get most of my GF foods) and it tasted horrible!


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