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kx250rider
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22 Mar 2013, 11:50 am

I think heat & humidity are poorly tolerated by human beings of all types; on or off the Spectrum.

I don't think I'm any less tolerant of it than anyone else, but I haven't really thought about it that much. I do a lot of physical outdoor work & activities, so I guess I'm used to whatever the weather does.

Charles



Joe90
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22 Mar 2013, 12:36 pm

Quote:
I think heat & humidity are poorly tolerated by human beings of all types; on or off the Spectrum.


I agree with this. Some people on the spectrum go outdoors on a hot day and think ''oh I'm hot, I must be hypersensitive to the heat, it will take a lot for everyone else to get hot.'' But that isn't true. Often in extreme temperature conditions people always comment on how hot it is or how cold it is, and a lot even make a big thing of it as though they are dying. Last summer my NT friend said he dipped his shirt in water and wore it to keep him cool. I don't go that far. I usually get cool when I'm just sitting about indoors with a fan on, or if I enjoy a nice ice lolly (frozen popsicle in case you're American).

I believe I just feel temperature like anyone else. I did read somewhere that men get hot quicker than women.


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22 Mar 2013, 3:00 pm

Has anybody considered the possibility in relocating to a cooler, coastal climate? Many West- Coast regions within ten to fifteen miles of the Pacific Ocean are usually pretty comfortable. The rare heat-waves involve a "dry-heat."

A few Northern-New England Coastal areas may be another possibility; yet the rough winter weather and cold is another challenge. These coastal regions periodically experience days of sometimes record heat, and humidity in the Summer.



Joe90
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23 Mar 2013, 10:02 am

I would like to live somewhere where you still get all four seasons, but have very hot summers and mild winters, so the lowest temperature lingers around 5-6C and doesn't really snow. Then I would be more relaxed. I don't mind the rain.


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Yellow-bellied Woodpecker
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23 Mar 2013, 6:38 pm

btbnnyr wrote:
My favorite season is winter. I hope to move to the Yukon one day.


Why the Yukon? Have you considered the more temperate Northwest Coastal climates e.g., SE Alaska Coast, Washington, Oregon, Northern California (near some to the smaller cities/larger towns)? Coastal regions are usually cool; even cooler than the Yukon during their long Summer hours of daylight. "Yes, global climate change is bringing warmer Summers to Far Northern Regions."

Immigrating to Canada is difficult i.e., as it can be a difficult process to prove you have occupational skills that cannot be filled by Canadian citizens.

Again, plenty of places with (and even without) temperate climates were people with Aspergers are perfectly happy.

P.S. When I was young (long before the Internet-- which as we know, boosts our awareness of far-away places), I wanted to relocate out of Los Angeles to that remote NorthWestern region.

What really helped change my mind (partly in thanks to my Aunt & Uncle; longtime residents of Portland, Oregon (who were aware of rural prejudices)) is that small rural areas are weary of outsiders, offer very little in the way of recreational, cultural and dining opportunties, and hence many residents have "too little to do" (the adage, "the idle mind is the devil's playground" comes to mind).

Hence many towns (even in Whitehorse, Yukon-- their largest city/Provincial Capital) are well aware of the "rough and rugged" lifestyles, As I can personally imagine can be "very scary" to an adult with Aspergers. In other words, this is one type of isolation that is not good; even by the wishes of those on the Autism Spectrum?

By any chance, did you watch the 1990s CBS TV Series 'Northern Exposure?' This was a quirky, funny, well thought-out series. I knew that as small Alaskan towns go, the ficticious Alaskan town in the series was "the Riviera" by comparison to other towns (ficticious is the operative word here). Personally, I'd be uncomfortable travelling by float-plane to "civilization" the float-plane pilot in the TV series offered travel to and from Fairbanks, Anchorage, and Juneau.

Any alternate locations in mind for relocation?

Thank-you



MusicalWonders
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29 Apr 2013, 7:03 pm

Heat gives me headaches and stomachaches if it's too much.