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Oresteia
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06 Dec 2011, 3:28 pm

Hello,

I know this a little random but I've recently attended a fantastic PAWS course through dogs for disabled promoting a pet dog for children on the spectrum.

Initially I went along as my daughter was very mcuh wanting a dog BUT upon trying to increase her exposure to dogs she's actually afraid of them :( I honestly feel that given time in our own home with our own gentle well chosen dog she'd come round but am I just being a bit crazy there just because I'd love a dog. Her main issues are barking and jumping up - both rather basic doggy things :( and we knew that she'd never cope with a puppy and so were looking for an steady easy going adult. We're concerned that far from helping, exposure to another dog will make it worse for her.

We were hoping to get a dog just after Christmas (& I really thought it'd be great for her for many reasons) but are seriously reconsidering. Wondered if anyone has a child who loves their own pet but doesn't like strange dogs ? Does anyone have a "magic" non barking non jumping dog or is this just not a reality.

Thanks in advance



SilverSolace
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06 Dec 2011, 5:19 pm

Magical non barking non jumping dog = King Charles Cavalier
Though the cavalier kind has a nice mellow temperament and good obedience, they tend to have more health risks. My family is getting one specifically because they aren't known for jumpiness and noisiness.

I've also had good experiences with the labrador retrievers I've had/seen, but I can name a few people who have experienced the opposite.
So it really depends on the individual dog. Just keep your eyes and ears open, ask around, and you'll find one that's right ^_^



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06 Dec 2011, 5:36 pm

What I would do is get in contact with any service dog schools in your area; I particularly suggest a guide dog school. These schools occasionally have dogs who, after being brought in for their training, are released for some reason, such as a dislike for the feeling of a harnesse, or for medical reasons (an example being risk factors for hip dysplasia when they get older). These dogs are already trained and have (mostly) grown out of their puppy hyperactivity. Guiding Eyes for the Blind, based in Yorktown Heights, NY, often puts young adult dogs up for adoption, and most other schools will as well. Service dog schools would be very understanding of any issues your daughter would have with a dog and would help you to find the right dog for your family, whether it is through them, or through another avenue.

I have a lot of experience with guide dogs and guide dog schools; my mother is totally blind and has had guide dogs consistently for more than 30 years. Guides, whether full-fledged, or released dogs, are all very well behaved, as schools have very strict training programs for their puppies before they even come back to the school as young adults. Puppy raisers are required to attend weekly (or twice monthly) training classes (the number depends on the age of the puppy and the school) that are strictly for possible future guide dogs; they not only learn basic obedience, but not to jump on people, not to run off no matter who is walking them, and get a lot of socialization. These dogs know how to react to everything. Labrador Retrievers are the most common guide dogs, and they are great with children, not to mention that they are very intelligent; Labs, particularly Yellow and Black Labs, tend to be very mellow, and most, at least in my experience, don't bark as often as some other breeds.

I have the same problems with barking, particularly if it starts suddenly when I'm not expecting it. I wish you luck!


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snpeden
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06 Dec 2011, 7:00 pm

I second the King Charles. Boyfriend's mom has one and he is such a sweet dog. I've never heard him bark and he's not all overwhelming and twitchy like you might expect of a small dog. The only issue I've known him to have is that as he's gotten older, he's become a bit of a compulsive licker. Might be because he's at home too much on his own though.
Whatever you do, don't get a dane with those types of sensory issues. I love my doggy but she jumps and leans on people and basically causes me to be overwhelmed on a daily basis.



DuneyBlues
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06 Dec 2011, 7:17 pm

A Poodle is definitely an autistic dog..


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Blueskygirl
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07 Dec 2011, 12:00 am

A Shih-Tzu is by no means an intelligent dog, but my daughter loves my brother's. She asked for a dog for months, and we ended up getting a part Border Collie, part something else from a shelter. She's an absolutely awesome dog that's a good mix of gentle and energetic (She can jump pretty high to catch frisbees and needs to every day). My daughter loves her, but honestly, I think she would have been happier with a lap dog...one more low-key and cuddly. A King Charles is a great choice! Also, I know they're big dogs, but I grew up with Golden Retrievers and they are such gentle, loyal, and smart dogs.



Blueskygirl
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07 Dec 2011, 12:03 am

DuneyBlues wrote:
A Poodle is definitely an autistic dog..


Yes! Another good choice.



JHenn
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07 Dec 2011, 7:42 am

Definitely not a yorkie! I have a 2 year old yorkie that I love SO so much. My son likes her, and at times will try to bond with her because he knows how crazy about her I am and he seems to want to join in on that. Like he'll say "She's so cute isn't she Mom?" or he'll greet her really enthusiastically when she comes in the room. But most of the time she drives him nuts. I play mediator between them every day. She's extremely sweet but she can be very hyper. She seems to have just one setting: play. She's either sleeping curled up in my lap or she's trying to get someone to throw a toy for her. She's not too bad with the barking, but it happens. Mostly she climbs all over people's laps and she licks excessively. I've told Joe she's licking because that's how she gives kisses and she's trying to tell him she loves him, but understanding that concept doesn't really make the sensation of a tiny puppy tongue any easier to deal with if you really hate it.
I'm hoping she mellows out with age but I hear this is just how the breed is. I'd find her a new home, but honestly I've had a lot of dogs in my lifetime and she's by far my favorite. I know loving a dog is not the same as a child but what I feel for that dog is second only to what I feel for my son. I literally love her more than my fiancee :) and I think thats why my son tries so hard to tolerate her, because he knows she means a lot to me.
My son seems much more into cats since everything dogs do that he hates, cats don't do. There's even a cat breed called a "Ragdoll" thats very much like a dog, minus the barking. They'll play fetch and they'll just hang limply while being carried around (hence the name).



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07 Dec 2011, 3:45 pm

snpeden wrote:
I second the King Charles. Boyfriend's mom has one and he is such a sweet dog. I've never heard him bark and he's not all overwhelming and twitchy like you might expect of a small dog. The only issue I've known him to have is that as he's gotten older, he's become a bit of a compulsive licker. Might be because he's at home too much on his own though.
Whatever you do, don't get a dane with those types of sensory issues. I love my doggy but she jumps and leans on people and basically causes me to be overwhelmed on a daily basis.

I suppose its a lot in the training but the 2 King Charles that live across the street from us bark ALL THE TIME and jump on me whenever I go into the yard. Granted our neighbor who owns these dogs is a partially disabled older man who doesn't do much in the way of training them. They just get to do whatever they want. They are certainly friendly dogs but need to be well trained from the get go.



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07 Dec 2011, 3:52 pm

Blueskygirl wrote:
DuneyBlues wrote:
A Poodle is definitely an autistic dog..


Yes! Another good choice.

I had a toy poodle as a child and she would not have been a good choice for my daughter. She's was the loveliest little thing, very gentle and friendly, but extremely highly strung and excitable. But, it probably depends on the dog's own personality. We would need a calm dog, to help keep our daughter calm. I love King Charles spaniels and I think they would be great as would a labrador. I'd have one tomorrow, but my husband isn't budging on the matter.


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Oresteia
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07 Dec 2011, 5:13 pm

Thanks for all the suggestions :D i'st certainly given me something to think about. I'd never considered a King Charles so will def look into this breed thanks. Wondered if anyone had any Whippet experience as we were advised they were very gentle, sleepy and good natured ? (know they're not good with cats but I'm allergic to cats so no problme for us there) and obviously smaller than a greyhound (think this would be way too big for her) .

I'm SOoooo disappointed as I would've loved to get a dog pretty much straight after Christmas, BUT we'd like to get it right for everyone and I want my daughter to feel comfortable, safe and enjoy the dog, rather than being upset.

Will also def try the service dogs "reject" (said with love) route to see if they have might have just the right dog.

Thanks again



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07 Dec 2011, 8:49 pm

Mom's Cavalier is cute but SUPER skittish and noisy!



DuneyBlues
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07 Dec 2011, 9:29 pm

Mummy_of_Peanut wrote:
Blueskygirl wrote:
DuneyBlues wrote:
A Poodle is definitely an autistic dog..


Yes! Another good choice.

I had a toy poodle as a child and she would not have been a good choice for my daughter. She's was the loveliest little thing, very gentle and friendly, but extremely highly strung and excitable. But, it probably depends on the dog's own personality. We would need a calm dog, to help keep our daughter calm. I love King Charles spaniels and I think they would be great as would a labrador. I'd have one tomorrow, but my husband isn't budging on the matter.


Well it depends on the breeder..


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shrox
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07 Dec 2011, 9:48 pm

Border collies!



Mummy_of_Peanut
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08 Dec 2011, 10:32 am

DuneyBlues wrote:
Mummy_of_Peanut wrote:
Blueskygirl wrote:
DuneyBlues wrote:
A Poodle is definitely an autistic dog..


Yes! Another good choice.

I had a toy poodle as a child and she would not have been a good choice for my daughter. She's was the loveliest little thing, very gentle and friendly, but extremely highly strung and excitable. But, it probably depends on the dog's own personality. We would need a calm dog, to help keep our daughter calm. I love King Charles spaniels and I think they would be great as would a labrador. I'd have one tomorrow, but my husband isn't budging on the matter.


Well it depends on the breeder..

True. And with King Charles spaniels, although I love them, there's a fair bit of in-breeding related illness, definitely in this country anyway. So, you really have to be careful when you're choosing a puppy.


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